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In the shadow of Paul Martin: Can you trust the Liberals?

Photo: Georges Alexandar/Michael Ignatieff/flickr

Here we go again -- the Red Book 3.0, yet another build-up of Liberal election promises just like the ones we've seen before (though I admit the one about changing the voting system might be hard to dodge). The most infamous, of course, was Jean Chretien's, which he held high and waved at every opportunity in the 1993 election. Co-authored by Paul Martin, it promised the world as we would like it: strong communities, enhanced medicare, equality, increased funding for education, an end to child poverty. You could almost hear the violins playing. But what turned out to be the most remarkable thing about the book of promises was the record number that was ultimately broken: all of them.

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Brad Zubyk
| June 10, 2015
Preston Manning
| May 15, 2015
Columnists

The Liberals have lost their way

Photo: Adam Scotti/Justin Trudeau/flickr

In deciding not to oppose the adoption of Bill C-51, the Anti-Terrorist Act 2015, the Liberal Party of Canada has committed a serious error of judgment.

The Harper Conservatives have laid before the House of Commons legislation that would authorize the detention of Canadian citizens without evidence of committing a crime, but simply because they were thought possible of committing terrorist acts.

Bill C-51 empowers the government to transform CSIS -- an intelligence-gathering agency -- into a quasi secret police with the power to lock up citizens suspected to have shown support for a cause deemed terrorist by the government.

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We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

Do

  • Tell the truth and avoid rumours.
  • Add context and background.
  • Report typos and logical fallacies.
  • Be respectful.
  • Respect copyright - link to articles.
  • Stay focused. Bring in-depth commentary to our discussion forum, babble.

Don't

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  • Engage trolls. Flag suspect activity instead.
| February 11, 2015
Image: Flickr/University of Saskatchewan
| October 1, 2014
Brian Gallant
| September 24, 2014
Jim Prentice
| September 22, 2014
Chrystia Freeland
| August 25, 2014
Image: greenparty.ca
| July 28, 2014
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