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Photo: Ontario Chamber of Commerce/flickr
| May 5, 2014
| January 25, 2013

Video: Education workers hold funeral for collective bargaining rights in Ontario

Devastated by a far-reaching anti-worker bill (Bill 115 passed a few days ago), rank-and-file education workers convened a funeral for collective bargaining rights on the lawn of Queen's Park, Monday September 10, 2012. Workers and friends joined to reflect on our loss and pledge ourselves for the future.

Dearly beloved, we rank-and-file members and education workers have gathered here today indeed during a very solemn dark day to commemorate another victim in the death of the march to austerity. As the McGuinty Government continues his attack on the rights of working people, as he attempts to pass such foul and distasteful legislation named the "Putting Students First Act."

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ETFO rally at Queen's Park. Photo: andres musta/Flickr
| September 17, 2012
Columnists

Only teachers and their unions can save public education

Photo: andres musta/Flickr

Who will save our schools, and public education?

Not Premier Dalton McGuinty, who's bought into the common obsession that the money "just isn't there." So he freezes public sector wages, pulling even more money out of the economy, assuring there'll be even less in taxes to spend on programs, leading to the same death spiral that Europe is following. I know high-school kids who understand this better than Dalton, but maybe it's because they can still take economics and business courses -- although his stress on standardized tests in the "basics" is undermining all that.

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Columnists

Shooting baby hippos for the sake of austerity

Baby hippo at Werribee Zoo. Photo: Dan Gordon/Flickr

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In the early 1990s, CTV broadcaster Eric Malling told Canadians the sad tale of a baby hippo shot by authorities at a New Zealand zoo.

Sad, but apparently necessary, Malling suggested in a special broadcast from down under. After all, New Zealand had big deficits, so there was no money to expand the hippo pen. What was a country to do but blow the newborn hippo away?

Malling's cautionary tale, which helped pitch an austerity agenda to Canadians 20 years ago, wouldn't seem out of place today, as we're once again being urged to hunker down for lean, mean times.

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| March 28, 2012

Balancing needs with revenues in the Ontario budget equation

Photo: Kitty Canuck

On March 27, residents of Ontario will get a clear picture of the implications of choosing to eliminate the public debt by 2017-18 within the current public revenue framework.

The key question to be considered: how much are we willing to lose in order to eliminate the deficit without increasing government revenue?

Based on Ontario public accounts, over the last five years (fiscal year 2006 to fiscal year 2010), health-care spending in Ontario increased at an average nominal rate of 7.1 per cent per year.

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Pushing back on the nuclear path: Part 1

Nuclear Stations in Canada

Being true to my inner technology geek, I have compulsively followed energy issues for years. Energy discourse is not for everyone, however. I've realized this the socially awkward way by bringing up Ontario's electricity future in casual conversation at house parties.

But with the recent one-year anniversary of the ongoing Fukushima nuclear disaster, forecasts abound on the prospects of nuke power surviving yet another devastating public relations catastrophe. However, in all these stories about nuclear meltdowns and the future of nuclear energy, I was struck by a significant gap: where is the Canadian content?

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Images from anti-austerity rally in Toronto

Photo: Krystalline Kraus
Friday's rally in Toronto was organized as a pre-budget showdown in response to the Drummond report.

Related rabble.ca story:

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