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| November 17, 2016

Bill C-51 empowers the government and security establishment to violate charter rights

The Anti-terrorism Act (2015) has been routinely called out by activists, journalists, and legal scholars for empowering Canadian government with the ability to violate charter rights.

Related rabble.ca story:

| November 16, 2016
Columnists

Canada's torture consumers and the faux national security consultation

Photo: Kent Lins/flickr

Anyone following discussions on the ultimate disposition of the Harper regime's C-51 "anti-terror" legislation -- which received crucial Liberal support during a 2015 Parliamentary vote -- will soon be hearing a lot about "SIRC." The acronym will be bandied about as various professors, lawyers and terrorism industry "experts" bloviate on what they think will "improve" a law that is so fundamentally flawed and dangerous that taking anything short of an abolitionist position is to be complicit in the human rights abuses C-51 authorizes.

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B.C. Civil Liberties Association calls on Canadians to participate in public consultations on Bill C-51

Flickr/Kent Lins
Micheal Vonn of the B.C. Civil Liberties Association says it’s imperative for Canadians to participate if they have concerns about the new security powers brought in under Bill C-51.

Related rabble.ca story:

Redeye

Liberals launch public consultation on national security

October 16, 2016
| Micheal Vonn of the B.C. Civil Liberties Association says it’s imperative for Canadians to participate if they have concerns about the new security powers brought in under Bill C-51.
Length: 14:25 minutes (13.21 MB)
| October 16, 2016
| September 14, 2016
| September 13, 2016
Columnists

Redress is overdue for targets of Canada's no-fly list

Photo: OZinOH/flickr

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It has now been five months since we started hearing and reading about Canadian kids affected by additional security screening measures when they try to board a plane, and unfortunately, the situation hasn't improved much since.

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We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

Do

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  • Add context and background.
  • Report typos and logical fallacies.
  • Be respectful.
  • Respect copyright - link to articles.
  • Stay focused. Bring in-depth commentary to our discussion forum, babble.

Don't

  • Use oppressive/offensive language.
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  • Bully or troll.
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  • Engage trolls. Flag suspect activity instead.
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