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Columnists

The vilification of Julian Assange

Despite being granted bail, Wikileaks founder and editor Julian Assange remains imprisoned in London, awaiting extradition proceedings to answer a prosecutor's questions in Sweden. He hasn't been formally charged with any crime. His lawyers have heard that a grand jury in the United States has been secretly empanelled, and that a U.S. federal indictment is most likely forthcoming.

Politicians and commentators, meanwhile, have been repeatedly calling for Assange to be killed.

Columnists

Beware the national security state

For those considering issue triage -- picking five or six issues to focus on -- in the fight to rid the country of the current government, one area that is critical to the outcome is exposing the Harper government's construction of the national security state.

I am referring here to the commitment of the Harper government to implementing policies that increase the importance of a war-fighting military in Canadian society, its preoccupation with tough-on-crime legislation, its blank cheque for security operations like the one "protecting" the G20 Summit in June and its continued efforts to convince Canadians that they face the constant risk of terrorist attack.

Putin's procedure: The new Russian power bloc

| April 9, 2014

Launching the Vigil campaign: Seeking justice in inadmissability cases in Canada

Monday, March 24, 2014 - 6:00pm

Location

The Holy Trinity Church
10 Trinity Square
Toronto, ON
Canada
43° 39' 16.0128" N, 79° 22' 54.57" W

Come and learn about the problem of national security and "inadmissability" in the refugee context.

Oscar Vigil, journalist, community leader, loving husband and father, is a refugee claimant from El Salvador who was unjustly ruled "inadmissable" to Canada by immigration officials. Oscar faces the threat of deportation and sepration from his Canadian family.

Please RSVP to info@vigilcampaign.ca or phone: 647-606-0440

Everyone is welcome to come.

Columnists

CSIS still the cat in the birdcage

Photo: rubyblossom./flickr

A few years ago, Canada's bird lovers came in for some well-deserved looks of bemusement when many wondered why their cute little budgies and canaries kept disappearing every time a cat was placed inside their birdcages. After all, it was argued, cats were subject to significant and robust oversight mechanisms such as the Feline Activities Review Committee, to ensure the birds would be safe from purring predators.

David J. Climenhaga

Caught in an apparent conflict like Chuck Strahl? No problem! Double down!

| January 8, 2014
Stephen Kimber

Fifth annual Halifax International Security Forum: Millions in spending, little peace or security

| November 26, 2013
Columnists

Science, ethics and torture

Image:  Lance Page / t r u t h o u t, Adapted From: bright-political / flickr

Growing up in Tunisia during the '80s and early '90s, I sometimes gleaned information from adults around me who whispered that the opponents of the regime -- first the Communists and then the Islamists -- were tortured in secret chambers where the services of a doctor were used, sadly, in an evil way.

People at that time said that the role of the doctor was to make sure that during the torture session, the prisoners are harmed severely but not enough to be killed. In a nutshell, the doctors were there to make sure that the torturers didn't send the prisoners to the "other world." Ignoring all the details around these stories, I felt horrified.

Columnists

Supreme Court's secret hearing and Judge Nadon's Charter dismissal

Photo: wyliepoon/flickr

Just before Thanksgiving, the Supreme Court of Canada held two days of hearings regarding the fate of Mohamed Harkat, detained in prison and under house arrest for over a decade by a secret trial security certificate, the reasons for which he has never been allowed to know and challenge. October 10 was a public hearing that he could attend, while October 11 was one he was not invited to, nor were his lawyers, the media, or the public. In fact, the eight judges of the Supreme Court disappeared to hold a secret hearing somewhere in Canada.

Nightmares coming to life: Ottawa writers stage reading of 'The Trial' in conjunction with Supreme Court challenge

A few short hours after the Supreme Court of Canada hears the public portion of a precedent-setting secret hearing on Thursday, October 10, a collection of Ottawa-area writers and performers will gather at St. Paul's University at 7:30 p.m. to read a staged adaptation of Kafka's The Trial, the classic novel that begins, "Someone must have been telling lies about Joseph K., for without having done anything wrong he was arrested one fine morning."

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