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Long Live Occupy: How gender justice became part of the Occupy movement

Image: rabble.ca

On a warm spring day in May of 2012, some 300 people, mostly women, gathered in Washington Square Park, Manhattan, to hold the First Feminist General Assembly.

At the time, a mere two and a half years ago, the Assembly movement was relatively new to North America, so this was truly an historic moment. It was also significant because that year May 17th was the International Day Against Homophobia and Transphobia, and the date marked the 181st anniversary of the first Women’s Anti-Slavery Convention in 1831.

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Long Live Occupy: Challenging white privilege in Occupy

Photo: flickr/Michael_Swan

The ‘Occupy’ movement feels like it happened ages ago, but its resonance remains, at least for this young racialized activist, who is willing to admit that it was the most radical experience of participatory democracy that he has ever engaged with.

This however says more about the past, present and ongoing nature of my experiences in a society built on exclusion, genocide and racial exploitation than it does with the democratic nature of the spontaneous and collective movement known as Occupy Toronto. 

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| November 3, 2014

Long Live Occupy: Occupy forever!

rabble's own Humberto 'Not Rex' DaSilva reflects on the Occupy movement and how it brought class consciousness into the Zeitgeist.

Check out rabble's series 'Occupy is Dead. Long Live Occupy'.

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Where are we three years after Occupy?

It's the third anniversary of the Occupy protests. rabble is launching a new series that kicks off with this piece by Judy Rebick.

Related rabble.ca story:

Long Live Occupy: Occupy, three years later

Photo: Rabble.ca

This post by Judy Rebick is the first in a rabble.ca series, Occupy is Dead. Long live Occupy. The series will look at what has grown out of the Occupy movement:

Even though the last three years have seen almost a continuous uprising of people demanding more democracy and less corporate control, with most of it taking place in public squares and much of it calling itself Occupy, people still say that Occupy has disappeared. 

Most recently, Occupy Central with Peace and Love was one of the key groups organizing the powerful occupation of the financial district in Hong Kong demanding real democracy. 

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Image: rabble.ca
| October 14, 2014
Asia Pacific Currents

Occupy Hong Kong

October 4, 2014
| Labour news from the Asia Pacific region, and an interview about the Occupy Hong Kong movement and labour relations in mainland China, with Eli Friedman.
Length: 29:40 minutes (13.59 MB)

Hong Kong demonstrators continue to demand response from Beijing

Photo: Raewadee Parnmukh

HONG KONG – On Thursday, student and Occupy Central leaders threatened to besiege government offices if Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying continues to reject any dialogue with the people and show no signal of making any concessions by the end of the day.

The escalation of actions is deemed necessary by pro-democracy leaders who have exhausted all legal means of pressuring the Hong Kong government into responding to popular demands for democracy. Their efforts have included rallies and meetings with Beijing to an unofficial referendum in which 800,000 voted for democracy. The controversial electoral reform process became the city's focus in January of 2013.

At least 200,000 demonstrators continued to block downtown roads as the protests entered into a sixth day.

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Image: Wikimedia Commons
| May 20, 2014
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