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Image: Council of Canadians
| September 28, 2016
Oil from Husky Energy pipeline spill into North Saskatchewan River.  Photo: Shel
| August 2, 2016

What is the impact of the extractive oil industry on our health?

In 2014, Women’s Earth Alliance (WEA) and Native Youth Sexual Health Network (NYSHN) began a multi-year initiative to document the ways that the sexual and reproductive health of Indigenous women, Two Spirit and young people in North America are impacted by extractive industries. Land Body Defense aims to support their leadership in resisting environmental violence in their communities.

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Brad Wall
| June 15, 2016
Columnists

Fort Mac invites a search for meaning but symbolism is harder than it looks

Photo: Premier of Alberta/flickr

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Someone I know out West says there's a strong sense of not being allowed to explicitly connect the Fort Mac wildfires with its oil drilling activity, you have to "tiptoe" around the "meaning" or coincidence.

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Columnists

To 'Leap' or to sleep? That is the question.

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Photo: Ian Burt/flickr
| December 3, 2015
Photo: Peter Blanchard/flickr
| December 2, 2015
Columnists

Protests against Arctic drilling spark a new Battle of Seattle

Photo: Backbone Campaign/flickr

It has been more than 15 years since tear gas filled the streets of Seattle and tens of thousands of people protested the meeting of the World Trade Organization, or WTO. That week of protests in late 1999 became known as "The Battle of Seattle," as the grassroots organizers successfully blocked world leaders, government trade ministers and corporate executives from meeting to sign a global trade deal that many called deeply undemocratic, harming workers' rights, the environment and Indigenous people globally.

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Photo: docentjoyce/flickr
| April 7, 2015
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