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Pan Am Games over-spending billions, but it's okay 'cause it's public money

Photo: flickr/ Chris Harte

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If a group constructing a massive project for you set a budget of $1.4 billion, but later came back and said they were spending $2.5 billion, what would you do? Normally you would probably throw the whole team out the door, and perhaps sue them for the $1.1-billion overrun.

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We need to keep Hydro One in public hands

Photo: flickr/ BriYYZ

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Undeniably, climate change is one of the greatest threats facing humanity. And nobody can dispute that Canada, once a leader in the fight to protect our environment, has become a global laughing stock to the ever-growing numbers of people around the world who understand action is needed.

We also know from poll after poll, that solving the climate crisis is a high priority for Canadians. So, why this rift between public will and political action?

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June 24, 2015 |
RBC and Scotiabank will be paid up to $270 million in public funds for selling off 60 per cent of Hydro One.

New labour legislation needed to deal with precarious work: Let the consultations begin!

Photo: flickr/My name's axel

This week the Ontario Ministry of Labour initiated a series of public consultations on the changing nature of the modern workplace. 

The consultations are part of the Changing Workplace Review, which will consider how Ontario's current labour legislations could be reformed to support people in 'non-standard jobs,' meaning part-time, temporary or independent contract work. 

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Uniform discrimination: City of Toronto lifeguards demand equality in work gear

Photo: flickr/David Crane

If you've ever had to bear the scorching heat of a Toronto summer, you know that city pools are an essential part of the season. Torontonians flock to pools and water parks to find some relief, pools are like oases in the urban desert. 

This year will be no different, except that pool attendants and lifeguards are asking for one small change: a new equity policy for their uniforms.

As it stands, all City of Toronto aquatic staff, lifeguards, and swim instructors are issued the following: a two-piece uniform, consisting of a singlet and swim shorts.

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Ordered back to work, Ontario teachers say this labour dispute isn't over

Photo: Flickr/Emory Maiden

Teachers in Durham, Peel, and Sudbury's Rainbow school districts have been on strike for over three weeks. Yesterday, almost 70,000 high-school students went back to class, following a decision by the Ontario Labour Relations Board (OLRB).

While classes have resumed in the three striking school districts, the Ontario Secondary School Teachers Federation (OSSTF) says it won't be business as usual in Ontario high schools.

On Tuesday, just as the provincial government started the process of instituting back-to-work legislation, the OLRB rendered its decision, ruling that the three local strikes were, in fact, illegal.

Classes started up again on Wednesday.

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May 25, 2015 |
A dramatic increase in the number of alcohol-related charges over the Victoria Day weekend should be a warning to the Wynne government that increasing alcohol availability comes with consequences.
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Kathleen Wynne sells one public asset to create another

Photo: Premier of Ontario Photography/flickr

"What does Kathleen Wynne think you do with a majority?" moped a friend. "What does she have a majority for? Harper knows what to do with one. He even knew what to do with a minority."

When she ran, Wynne seemed committed to new tolls or taxes -- to expand public transit. Then she backtracked, and decided to sell off parts of Hydro One instead. Why would it matter if you sell one public asset to create another? You're just robbing Peter to pay Paul. To understand why, stroll with me down to the newly "revitalized" Union Station on Front Street.

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May 19, 2015 |
The Ontario government's plan to reform home care is short on details. The broad steps outlined in it contain potential for a strong and progressive vision to emerge, but there are also perils.
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