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Image: Flickr/Eric Norris
| January 6, 2017
Flickr/Gage Skidmore
| November 13, 2016
Columnists

Are you voting for policies that hurt you? Neoliberal polices and your paycheque

Photo: Amie Fedora/flickr

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Another federal election is coming, and the promises are gearing up. But after the election is over and politicians start implementing those promises, do they really work out the way we had hoped? 

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Columnists

Technology's great leap forward

Photo: Ed Burtynsky/TED Conference/Flickr

When we look back over the course of the past hundred years it becomes clear that the period 1948-1973 was a golden one for the "developed" countries. Seventy-five per cent of world economic production came from them and 80 per cent of manufactures were exported by them. This was the era of the greatest economic expansion of the century not only in terms of growth but also in terms of the decrease in unemployment: in the United States at its most impressive unemployment was at 2.93 per cent in 1953, in Western Europe the unemployment rate in the 1960s was 1.5 per cent and in Japan it was 1.3 per cent. Technological innovation was central to the advances brought about during this economic golden age.

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Photo: the_green_squirrel/Flickr
| December 21, 2012
CANSIM Table 202-0104
| December 19, 2012
Columnists

Faith overtakes fact in celebrations of the Canada-U.S. Free Trade Agreement

Figure 1. Source: From CANSIM Tables 380-0063 and 228-0002.

Last month's over-the-top "celebrations" of the 25th anniversary of Brian Mulroney and Ronald Reagan's signing of the Canada-U.S. Free Trade Agreement seemed strained, to my mind. The self-congratulation and back patting struck me as rather overdone, contrived even. Remember, this wasn't the 25th anniversary of the FTA's implementation (that won't occur until Jan.

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We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

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CEO Peter Brown at Fraser Institute VIP reception. Photo: Raj Taneja/Flickr
| September 26, 2012
Photo: Carissa Rogers/Flickr
| August 17, 2012
| January 5, 2012
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