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Photo: Toban B./flickr
| May 19, 2015
| April 21, 2015
Columnists

The Right to Be Cold: Sounding the alarm on climate change in the North

Photo: Robert J. Galbraith/flickr

Sheila Watt-Cloutier is one of the most widely respected political figures to emerge from Canada's Arctic, and this potential was identified early on. When she was just 10 years old, she and her friend Lizzie were selected as promising future Inuit leaders and sent to live with a white family in the tiny coastal community of Blanche, N.S. Having grown up in Nunavik, Que., on dog sleds and in canoes, the young Watt-Cloutier loved new experiences and approached the long voyage south in the spirit of adventure. The girls were in for what Watt-Cloutier now describes as a "brutal shock."

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Photo: Sally T. Buck/flickr
| March 17, 2015
| March 13, 2015
Redeye

Canadian embassy involved in suppressing protest in Mexico

March 11, 2015
| Documents obtained by Mining Watch Canada show that the Canadian ambassador to Mexico assisted Excellon Resources in its efforts to get the Mexican state to shut down a protest at one of its mines.
Length: 17:02 minutes (15.6 MB)
Redeye

Ten years of free trade in Central America

January 16, 2015
| The Central America Free Trade Agreement was ratified in 2005. Ten years later, most of the signatory countries are struggling with poverty, violence and increased emigration.
Length: 13:58 minutes (12.79 MB)

How are Canada's municipalities fighting resource extraction?

Photo: flickr/Toshiyuki IMAI

Canadians are concerned about the impact of resource extraction on land and the irreversible destruction of precious ecosystems. Rural towns across the country are dealing with these issues of land use. 

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Columnists

If Alberta fracks, why can't we? Dispelling the myth of resource development

Photo: Paul B./flickr

The Wheeler commission on fracking did its due diligence under difficult circumstances, except for the part where it further warped an already unhinged debate. It did this by toying with scenarios and declaring that even the middling one would provide a billion dollars a year in economic benefits, and royalties in the hundreds of millions a year for decades.

So the hyper-questionable idea will remain afoot, fracking ban or not: we are sitting on a fortune that we are too backward and obtuse to develop.

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By Timkal (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.
| August 29, 2014
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