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Katell Quillévéré on 'Heal The Living,' science and mystery and the rituals of death

November 1, 2016
| Katell and David Peck talk about her new film "Heal The Living," science over mystery, living for our loved ones, taking care of others and the rituals of death.
Length: 27:14 minutes (18.7 MB)
| October 20, 2016
Green Majority Radio

Activism in the age of terror

June 20, 2016
| Peabody Energy is a massive coal company that recently filed for bankruptcy revealing the monumental degree to which they funded science denial. Also... terrorism.
Length: 55:09 minutes (50.51 MB)
MsRepresent

Emily Temple-Wood: 'If her name survived this long, that's a huge indicator of her importance.'

May 26, 2016
| In this week's episode, the biologist and Wikipedia editor discusses the erasure of women scientists.
Length: 59:45 minutes (109.43 MB)
Columnists

From politics to science, Chomsky motivates us to make the world more livable

Photo: jeanbaptisteparis/flickr

Noam Chomsky has been relentlessly demystifying and exposing political BS since the 1960s. He did it almost alone for decades though lately the torch passed to TV satirists like Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert. Reading Chomsky on politics, someone said, is like a purge. You may not recall all the disgusting propaganda he catalogued but you feel your system has been flushed out and you can start again. What a contribution. He's still doing it, at 87, with detail and high moral outrage, during this U.S. election.

But there's always been an alternate Chomsky: the pioneer of generative linguistics, a philosopher and historian of science. His recent book, What Kind of Creatures Are We?, is by Chomsky Two, the one who plumbs the mysteries of human thought and speech.

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Green Majority Radio

Is it too extreme to talk about climate change and human extinction?

February 22, 2016
| Leaders say they accept climate change, but don't act like they understand it. We recap the worst threats, and talk about how bad could it get if we keep going as we are.
Length: 54:07 minutes (49.55 MB)
Green Majority Radio

2015 in review

December 25, 2015
| We review a bunch of top 2015 news items (not just environmental stories) and draw conclusions about where the world is going as we reach the end of another year.
Length: 59:20 minutes (54.33 MB)

What can science centres teach us?

Science centres convey the principles, wonder and realities of the natural world to a public often overwhelmed by the jargon, pace and detail of science and engineering.

Related rabble.ca story:

Columnists

Science centres kindle passion for the natural world

Photo: Canada Science and Technology Museum/flickr

Like this column? rabble is reader-supported journalism. Chip in to keep stories like these coming.

As I write this I'm in Montreal just wrapping up my coverage of the Association of Science - Technology Centers (ASTC) annual conference.

Comments

We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

Do

  • Tell the truth and avoid rumours.
  • Add context and background.
  • Report typos and logical fallacies.
  • Be respectful.
  • Respect copyright - link to articles.
  • Stay focused. Bring in-depth commentary to our discussion forum, babble.

Don't

  • Use oppressive/offensive language.
  • Libel or defame.
  • Bully or troll.
  • Post spam.
  • Engage trolls. Flag suspect activity instead.

Sign the science pledge!

A strong democracy needs strong science

Canada's commitment to making decisions based on evidence, not politics, helped to build our prosperity and make our country one of the safest, healthiest, best educated and most compassionate countries in the world. Making evidence-based decisions requires investing in the science and research upon which they are founded but in recent years, our federal government has turned away from science, putting at risk the foundation of what makes Canada great.

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