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Columnists

Can permaculture save the world?

Photo: London Permaculture/flickr

A futuristic article by Kim Stanley Robinson, "How Science Saved the World," can be found in the February 2000 issue of the prestigious journal Nature (Vol. 403, p. 23). Looking 1,000 years into the future, Robinson reviews two books written around 3,000 AD: Science in the Third Millennium by Professor J. S. Khaldun; and Scientific Careers 2001-3000, written by a computer named "Ferdnand."

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MsRepresent

The brain and the ballet dancer: Dr. Crystal Dilworth on the co-dependency between art and science

September 16, 2014
| Does art need the structure of science? Can science grow without creativity? For Dr. Crystal Dilworth, the attraction between opposites is all about the brain and a little bit of chemistry.
Length: 28:06 minutes (51.46 MB)
MsRepresent

Dr. Jennifer Gardy on women in science and sexism in the media

July 24, 2014
| In this episode, Dr. Jennifer Gardy talks about women in science, sexism in the media, public health and the future of science research.
Length: 42:16 minutes (38.7 MB)
Columnists

Facebook and the bald-headed kid

Photo: Flickr/James Truepenny

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There's this cartoon you probably know. It features a big-headed, bald kid named Charlie and a girl named Lucy. Again and again in this amusing comic, Lucy promises not to move the football she's holding while the Charlie kid runs to kick it. And, again and again, to great bittersweet hilarity, she does and little Charlie goes flying landing on his back, chagrined but, we understand, still trusting in Lucy's innate goodness. We love that adorable sap, Charlie Brown.

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Columnists

Caring for your personal microbial ecosystem

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Hardly a week goes by without an article in a major scientific journal about the diversity of microorganisms living in and on our bodies. Few microbial species can be grown in pure culture, but modern DNA sequencing techniques have unleashed a flood of information about microbes associated with humans. Google Scholar analysis of the term "human microbiome" shows fewer than 1,000 articles between 1970 and 1999, 3,000 articles between 2000 and 2009, and over 17,000 articles since 2010. 

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Columnists

Solar Roadways: Just porkpie in the sky

Photo: OregonDOT/flickr

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Columnists

Why science isn't a buffet

Photo: Matt Hintsa/flickr

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Redeye

Victory in fight to save Experimental Lakes Area

April 28, 2014
| An area of 58 lakes in northwestern Ontario has been used as an outdoor laboratory since 1968 to study the stressors on freshwater systems. The federal government stopped funding the program in 2013.
Length: 12:55 minutes (11.83 MB)
Redeye

Destruction of Canadian research libraries huge loss for science

February 4, 2014
| The Conservative government plans to close seven of the 11 fisheries science libraries by 2015. Researchers says that it’s not clear how much valuable research will be lost in the process.
Length: 15:43 minutes (14.39 MB)

Save the Science Libraries

The politicians closing science libraries across the country claim it will save more than $400,000 every year. Official party line says all material from these facilities will be “digitized,” but no one seems willing to admit where the material is now, what resources will be used to undertake that process, and where the material will be stored.

Scientists, learners and activists are calling on us to remind the government that this plan is not acceptable by signing this petition.

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