short storiesSyndicate content

'Nothing Looks Familiar' asks: 'What does it mean to live in a body today?'

Nothing Looks Familiar

by Shawn Syms
(Arsenal Pulp Press,
2014;
$15.95)

Like this article? Chip in to keep stories likes these coming.

"I won't go out with another man on the killing floor," says Wanda, the narrator of 'On the Line,' in the opening line of Shawn Sym's debut collection Nothing Looks Familiar. "I can't stand the smell of them, or their attitudes."

Wanda's potential suitors work with her in a meat-packing plant, and carry the smell of dead flesh on their skin. Her preoccupation with their bodies' scent is understandable. It is also emblematic of the author's thematic concerns.

embedded_video

Comments

We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

Do

  • Tell the truth and avoid rumours.
  • Add context and background.
  • Report typos and logical fallacies.
  • Be respectful.
  • Respect copyright - link to articles.
  • Stay focused. Bring in-depth commentary to our discussion forum, babble.

Don't

  • Use oppressive/offensive language.
  • Libel or defame.
  • Bully or troll.
  • Post spam.
  • Engage trolls. Flag suspect activity instead.

Interview: Eliza Robertson talks #CanLit

Wallflowers

by Eliza Robertson
(Bloomsbury USA,
2014;
$26.00)

Eliza Robertson was born in Vancouver and grew up on Vancouver Island. Her stories have been shortlisted for the Journey Prize and CBC Short Story Prize. In 2013, she won the Commonwealth Short Story Prize.

Her first collection of stories, Wallflowers, came out with Hamish Hamilton Canada and Bloomsbury this year. She lives in England.

embedded_video

Comments

We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

Do

  • Tell the truth and avoid rumours.
  • Add context and background.
  • Report typos and logical fallacies.
  • Be respectful.
  • Respect copyright - link to articles.
  • Stay focused. Bring in-depth commentary to our discussion forum, babble.

Don't

  • Use oppressive/offensive language.
  • Libel or defame.
  • Bully or troll.
  • Post spam.
  • Engage trolls. Flag suspect activity instead.

In conversation with author Doretta Lau

Photo: flickr/Florin Gorgan
Yutaka Dirks interviews author Doretta Lau and reviews her debut collection of short stories 'How Does A Single Blade of Grass Thank the Sun?'

Related rabble.ca story:

Doretta Lau sets a new standard in Canadian literature

How Does A Single Blade of Grass Thank the Sun?

by Doretta Lau
(Nightwood Editions,
2014;
$19.95)

Please support our coverage of democratic movements and become a monthly supporter of rabble.ca.

embedded_video

Comments

We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

Do

  • Tell the truth and avoid rumours.
  • Add context and background.
  • Report typos and logical fallacies.
  • Be respectful.
  • Respect copyright - link to articles.
  • Stay focused. Bring in-depth commentary to our discussion forum, babble.

Don't

  • Use oppressive/offensive language.
  • Libel or defame.
  • Bully or troll.
  • Post spam.
  • Engage trolls. Flag suspect activity instead.
| November 21, 2013
| October 11, 2013

'Hellgoing' piles on life's uncertainties and allows characters to crawl through

Hellgoing

by Lynn Coady
(House of Anansi,
2013;
$19.95)

Congratulations to Lynn Coady for being shortlisted for the Giller Prize for this collection of short stories.

The short stories in Lynn Coady’s new collection Hellgoing scratch beneath the surface of everyday life, revealing the inner lives of characters who find themselves at odds with the social roles they inhabit. This struggle between public appearance and private life is everywhere in Hellgoing.

Among the uncomfortable people who populate these stories are an ambivalent nun, a high-functioning alcoholic, a conflicted landlord and an ageing ukulele player.

embedded_video

Comments

We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

Do

  • Tell the truth and avoid rumours.
  • Add context and background.
  • Report typos and logical fallacies.
  • Be respectful.
  • Respect copyright - link to articles.
  • Stay focused. Bring in-depth commentary to our discussion forum, babble.

Don't

  • Use oppressive/offensive language.
  • Libel or defame.
  • Bully or troll.
  • Post spam.
  • Engage trolls. Flag suspect activity instead.
Redeye

Book: Red Girl Rat Boy

September 24, 2013
| Author Cynthia Flood has just come out with a new collection of short stories. The stories range from left-wing life in Vancouver in the 1970s to the personal politics that exist within families.
Length: 16:33 minutes (15.16 MB)

'Everything Is So Political' interprets 'What is political?' into a diverse and memorable marriage of art and politics

Everything Is So Political: A Collection of Short Fiction by Canadian Writers

by Sandra McIntyre (editor)
(Roseway Publishing,
2013;
$19.95)

In a 2005 interview with Salman Rushdie, interviewer Jack Livings of The Paris Review asked a seemingly simple question of the author: "Could you possibly write an apolitical book?" Rushdie, known for his novels with overtly political themes, replied that he had "great interest in it," using the example of Jane Austen, whom he said could "explain the lives of her characters without a reference to the public sphere."

embedded_video

Comments

We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

Do

  • Tell the truth and avoid rumours.
  • Add context and background.
  • Report typos and logical fallacies.
  • Be respectful.
  • Respect copyright - link to articles.
  • Stay focused. Bring in-depth commentary to our discussion forum, babble.

Don't

  • Use oppressive/offensive language.
  • Libel or defame.
  • Bully or troll.
  • Post spam.
  • Engage trolls. Flag suspect activity instead.
| May 21, 2013
Syndicate content