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Luis Hernandez Navarro on the indignation of Mexico's crisis

Photo: Secretaría de Cultura Ciudad de México/flickr

Luis Hernandez Navarro was in Toronto this week to speak about the crisis in Mexico after the deaths and kidnappings of student teachers last fall. He's an eminent journalist and opinion editor at La Jornada, Mexico's second largest daily. It's well to the left of leftish papers elsewhere like the Star or Guardian.

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Redeye

Kshama Sawant on why Seattle voters elected a socialist

November 5, 2014
| Socialist Kshama Sawant ran for a seat on city council in Seattle with a campaign promise to introduce a minimum wage of $15, more than double the federal rate.
Length: 33:57 minutes (31.09 MB)
Image: Flickr/Kshama Sawant
| October 3, 2014

From war to revolution: How do we survive?

Angels of the Revolution

by J.W. Horton
(Self published,
2014;
$2.99)

Noam Chomsky crossed with Thomas Merton and Thomas Pynchon with a little politics mixed in for good measure? Count us in!

In short novel Angels of the Revolution by J.W. Horton, Katyusha and her lover, the Major, are two former pilots -- and current socialist revolutionaries -- searching the gritty streets of fictional capitol city Weimarstadt for Der Film, a mysterious and legendary piece of cinematography. Based on Germany's post First World War Weimar Republic, emotions and being collide with politics as former 'gun girl' Katyusha is haunted by war, numb to the violence that currently threatens her.

embedded_video

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'Responsible Capitalism' makes no sense: The Left must offer a real alternative

Photo: flickr/net_efekt

Ed Miliband's challenge to "the manufactured, the polished, the presentational" practice of politics, where democracy is reduced to "showbiz, a game, who is up and who is down," deserves to be discussed in terms that go beyond the effect this may have on his own electoral prospects. It should open up a larger debate on what's wrong with the practice of democracy today. For it is indeed the case that "people's sense of the artificiality, the triviality, the superficiality of politics is more highly tuned than ever," not only in the U.K., but in one country after another.

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| July 22, 2014
Photo: flickr/jacinta lluch valero
| July 4, 2014
| July 3, 2014
Columnists

The problem with right-wing populism

Photo: Michelle Tribe/flickr

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When Andrea Horwath is called a right-wing populist (by me, among others), I'd like to clarify that it's not the populist part that's objectionable. Populism is a good starting point. There's no agreed definition, but in general it builds on a sense among "the people" that they've been screwed: by the big shots, the elites, the one per cent -- a sense that's usually justified.

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Columnists

Europe disenchanted: After the European Parliament elections

Photo: European Parliament/flickr

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The great French poet Victor Hugo speaking to an international peace conference in 1849 called for the establishment of a United States of Europe. With the blood hardly dry after World War II ended in Europe in 1945, a group of French thinkers, notably Jean Monnet, drew up plans for European economic co-operation.

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