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After the U.S. Social Forum 2010: The potential for a multi-scalar strategy

Is the U.S. Social Forum primarily an arena for movements to propose a diversity of alternatives or is it a political agent of the left that pulls movements together into a counter-hegemonic program? Photo: Sasha Y. Kimel/Flickr
Is the U.S. Social Forum primarily an arena for movements to propose a diversity of alternatives or is it a political agent of the left that pulls movements together into a counter-hegemonic program?

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After the U.S. Social Forum 2010: The potential for a multi-scalar strategy

Is the U.S. Social Forum primarily an arena for movements to propose a diversity of alternatives or is it a political agent of the left that pulls movements together into a counter-hegemonic program? Photo: Sasha Y. Kimel/Flickr

In 1933, Mexican artist Diego Rivera completed his Detroit Industry fresco cycle. The abundant, controversial work, considered one the 20th century's outstanding achievements of monumental art, covers the four walls of the Garden Court in the Detroit Institute of Art.

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Colombia: Is peace possible?

The Peace Dialogues in Colombia are a wind of hope for Colombians, who have spent more than five decades living in a conflict which has soaked their land in blood and pain. The following is an interview with Carlos Lozano Guillén, Marcha Patriótica's spokesperson, newspaper editor and a consultant for previous peace dialogues, conducted by Fernanda Sánchez Jaramillo, a Colombian journalist and union advocate based in Vancouver, Canada. 

FSJ: You were in Havana recently. Who did you meet with and how was the atmosphere there?

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Canadian-based organizations express solidarity with Colombian rural peasant farmers' strike

| August 30, 2013

Ecuador's Rafael Correa wins landslide re-election

Photo:  Presidencia de la República del Ecuador / flickr

President Rafael Correa handily won a third term as Ecuador's head of state Sunday in a landslide victory demonstrating what many are calling a "clear mandate" for the continuation of his progressive economic policies and widespread support for his growing "citizens' revolution."

"This victory is yours. It belongs to our families, to our wife, to our friends, our neighbors, the entire nation," said Correa on a state television broadcast.  "We are only here to serve you. Nothing for us. Everything for you, a people who have become dignified in being free."

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Why the Harper government was happy with the ouster of Lugo in Paraguay

 Fernando Lugo campaigning in 2008. (Photo: Fernando Lugo Méndez / flickr)

Six weeks ago the left-leaning president of Paraguay Fernando Lugo was ousted in what some called an "institutional coup." Upset with Lugo for disrupting 61-years of one party rule, Paraguay's traditional ruling elite claimed he was responsible for a murky incident that left 17 peasants and police dead and the senate voted to impeach the president.

The vast majority of countries in the hemisphere refused to recognize the new government. The Union of South American Nations (UNASUR) suspended Paraguay's membership after Lugo's ouster, as did the MERCOSUR trading bloc. Last week the Council on Hemispheric Affairs reported: "Not a single Latin American government has recognized [Federico] Franco's presidency."

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Blair Redlin

A glimpse of Venezuela: Part two

| July 21, 2012
Blair Redlin

A glimpse of Venezuela: Part I

| July 12, 2012
Roger Annis

New agreements between Haiti, Venezuela and Cuba for social and economic development

| April 12, 2012
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