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Columnists

Will falling oil prices create a federal deficit? It doesn't matter.

Photo: Carissa Rogers/flickr

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Photo: pmwebphotos/flickr
| January 21, 2015
Columnists

What happens when oil prices go down instead of up

Photo: Sten Dueland/flickr

Luck plays a part in any political career. Napoleon famously asked of a general recommended to him for his military prowess: "so he is good -- but is he lucky?"

A barrel of oil that was selling in the US$110 range last summer, now sells for less than US$70. That was not the future Stephen Harper and his ruling Conservatives expected when the party leader touted Canada as an energy superpower, based on massive petroleum reserves -- the world's third largest after Saudi Arabia and Venezuela -- locked away in the bitumen sands of Alberta.

But there is good news for the Conservatives in the bad news.

Lower gasoline and heating oil prices will put money into the pockets of strapped Canadian workers, helping to drive up consumption and employment.

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Photo: Taber Andrew Bain/flickr
| November 25, 2014
Photo: 401(K) 2012/flickr
| October 2, 2014
Photo: Maia C/flickr
| August 28, 2014

It's time to reconsider the dangers of deregulation

Photo: Tony Sprackett/flickr
In the wake of the Mount Polley Mine spill, it's time to reconsider the dangers of deregulation more broadly and rebuild government's capacity to effectively protect the public interest.

Related rabble.ca story:

Photo: Tony Sprackett/flickr
| August 25, 2014
Photo: Paul VanDerWerf/flickr
| July 15, 2014
Columnists

Conservative deficit fear-mongering takes aim at dream of activist government

Photo: Premier of Ontario Photography/flickr

Please help rabble.ca stop Harper's election fraud plan. Become a monthly supporter.

Moody's decision to downgrade Ontario's credit rating last week was manna from heaven to commentators and media pundits bristling at the notion that activist government could be making a comeback.

For years, pundits have kept governments in a straightjacket when it comes to spending, intimidating the public into believing that the deficit gods are vengeful and unforgiving, and that Greece is only a short hop, skip and a jump away.

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We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

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