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Image: Wikimedia Commons
| July 27, 2016
Tzeporah Berman
| July 18, 2016
Image: Flickr/Premier of Alberta
| June 7, 2016

Fort McMurray residents rally together as families, workers return to 'devastated' city

Photo: flickr/Premier of Alberta

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Heavy equipment mechanic and former miner Ken Smith was among the thousands of Fort McMurray residents back in the fire-ravaged city this week.

Smith, president of Unifor local 707A, represents 3,400 Suncor Energy employees who work at facilities just north of Fort McMurray.

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Redeye

Disobedience: A film about the struggle to prevent climate catastrophe

May 9, 2016
| A new film by Kelly Nyks, director of Requiem for the American Dream, tells the story of four communities preparing for Break Free from Fossil Fuels actions in May 2016.
Length: 22:36 minutes (20.7 MB)

Suncor Energy ceases operations due to Fort McMurray fires

Photo credit: Dusty Lane Photography

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Alberta's wildfire has forced several Canadian oil and energy companies to scale back operations in and near Fort McMurray.

Suncor Energy, one of the affected companies, announced Wednesday its base plant -- located 25 km north of Fort McMurray -- had ceased operations due to safety concerns for employees. 

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April 29, 2016 |
Since spring of this year a small band of oil sands workers have come together to fight against the growing layoffs in the tar sands and to fight for a greener future.
| April 28, 2016

Chippewas of the Thames consider legal injunction to stop Enbridge's Line 9

Photo: flickr/Environmental Defence Canada

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The Chippewas of the Thames First Nation (COTTFN) is seriously considering filing for an immediate injunction against Enbridge's Line 9.

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Interview: Gordon Laxer on Big Oil, Rachel Notley and a greener future

Photo: flickr/Howl Arts Collective

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When Rachel Notley's NDP came to power last spring in Alberta, Gordon Laxer's book, After the Sands: Energy and Ecological Security for Canadians, on ecological renewal and Canadian petro-politics was already at the publisher. And so, he was given a week to do some major rewriting because he had not foreseen this political earthquake in the making.

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