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April 1 deadline looms for children of temporary foreign workers

Photo: flickr/Jeff Nelson

On April 1, 2015, new federal government rules will set the stage for the largest set of deportations in Canada's history. An estimated 70,000 temporary foreign workers whose contracts are expiring will either voluntarily leave Canada, be given deportation orders, or will continue living here without legal documents.

Ethel Tungohan interviewed temporary foreign workers about the impact the 4 & 4 rule will have on them and their families. All names in this piece have been changed to protect the interviewees.

 

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Temporary foreign workers and precarious work in Atlantic Canada

Photo: flickr/Dennis Jarvis
After a decade, the two-tier model of flexible migrant labour in Atlantic Canada is deeply entrenched and driving migration for local workers and for transnational migrants.

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Migrant advocacy groups fight April 1 temporary foreign worker deportations

On April 1, 2015, an estimated 70,000 temporary foreign workers whose contracts are expiring will either voluntarily leave Canada, be given deportation orders, or will continue living here without legal documents. Based on the number of temporary foreign workers seeking assistance from settlement services agencies and migrant organizations, 16,000 temporary foreign workers in Alberta will lose status in Alberta, which migrant advocates stress is a conservative estimate.

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Migrant work: A worldwide game of musical chairs plays out in Atlantic Canada

Photo: flickr/Dennis Jarvis

On March 7 New Brunswick Conservative MP John Williamson summed up the racialized caricature the Conservative government is using to prop up its economic policies in the Maritimes: lazy white locals and hardworking transnational migrants.

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Migrants in Atlantic Canada: How to survive in a remittance economy

Photo: Flickr/undergroundbastard

There was a lot of ire and eye-rolling on March 7 when New Brunswick Conservative MP John Williamson, in response to a question about labour shortages in meat-packing and processing, claimed: "it makes no sense to pay whities to stay home w

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Temporary foreign workers face deportation come April 1

Photo: flickr/ Saku Takakusaki

On April 1, 2015, new federal government rules will set the stage for the largest set of deportations in Canada's history. A new immigration policy targeting low-waged migrant workers in the Temporary Foreign Workers Program (TFWP) and the Live-In Caregiver Program (LCP) takes effect.  

This policy has been dubbed the "four and four" or "4 & 4" rule because the legislation introduced on April 1, 2012 states that migrant workers who have been employed in Canada for four years or more must leave the country, and that these workers will be barred from working in Canada for another four years, after which they can reapply for a work permit.

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Canada made Deepan Budlakoti stateless. Now it is denying him health care.

Photo: flickr/ Lydia

Imagine being 23 years old, born and raised in Canada, and then waking up one morning to the news that your citizenship has been stripped in the only country you have ever called home.

That is Deepan Budlakoti's story.

Born to Indian working class parents, growing up in the suburbs of Toronto, the first few years of Budlakoti's life read like that of any child of immigrant parents. But in 2010, Budlakoti's world as he knew it came to a screeching halt, and what happened after should give us all cause for concern.

On February 24, Deepan went to court to defend his right to health care.

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Edmonton TFW Protest
| February 26, 2015

Employment insurance and Harper's flexibility fanaticism

Photo: flickr/Stephen Harper

As oil prices drop, rumours in the Maritimes are on the rise: the region's migrant workers, who send money home from their jobs "out west," might be coming home for good.

In 2012, the Conservative government made deep cuts to the employment insurance (EI) program. The cuts were meant to encourage workers in high unemployment regions to relocate to low unemployment regions, like Alberta. Now, having heeded the call for mobility, workers will return home to stubbornly high unemployment rates and a hollowed-out EI program.

Welcome to Harper's flexibility fanaticism.

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International Migrants Day: Building solidarity between migrant and Canadian workers

Chris Ramsaroop and Melisa LaRue talk about a grassroots effort to build relationships and solidarity between temporary foreign workers and Canadian workers.

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