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Let's make September 11 a day without war

The ninth anniversary of the September 11 attacks on the United States should serve as a moment to reflect on tolerance. It should be a day of peace. Yet the rising anti-Muslim fervour here, together with the continuing U.S. military occupation of Iraq and the escalating war in Afghanistan (and Pakistan), all fuel the belief that the U.S. really is at war with Islam.

September 11, 2001, united the world against terrorism. Everyone, it seemed, was with the United States, standing in solidarity with the victims, with the families who lost loved ones. The day will be remembered for generations to come, for the notorious act of coordinated mass murder. But that was not the first Sept. 11 to be associated with terror:

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Columnists

No justice for Maher Arar in U.S. court

"Extraordinary rendition" is White House-speak for kidnapping. Just ask Maher Arar. He's a Canadian citizen who was "rendered" by the U.S. to Syria, where he was tortured for almost a year.

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Columnists

Combatting ISIS: The case for universal service

Photo: Ryan Millar/flickr

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Why do young Canadians join ISIS, and what can be done to prevent this? 

Bill C-51 -- the Harper government's anti-terrorism act -- offers one approach: make it a crime to promote or advocate "terrorism." But a slippery slope leads from criminalizing extremist ideas to criminalizing dissent. Four former Canadian prime ministers, in a statement critical of Bill C-51, point out that "serious human rights abuses can occur in the name of maintaining national security."  

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We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

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| February 21, 2015
Photo: Kelly Mercer/flickr
| February 17, 2015
War on terror
| February 17, 2015
| February 14, 2015

Harper's 'anti-terror' bill may turn Indigenous activists into terrorists

Photo: flickr/Stephen Harper
Experts and commentators have called Harper's new anti-terror bill, which will create a secret police force, terrifying, illegal, unconstitutional, dictatorial and totalitarianism.

Related rabble.ca story:

| February 12, 2015
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