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Why did Steven Blaney cry 'terrorism' when questioned about report?

Answering a question about Voices-Voix's Dismantling Democracy report Public Safety Minister Blaney hurled the accusation of "terrorism." Where did that come from?

Related rabble.ca story:

Photo: US Embassy Canada/Wikimedia Commons
| June 18, 2015
| June 8, 2015
Columnists

With Harper's war on terror, the white whale comes to Canada

Image: Palmovish from DeviantArt/flickr

Vietnam is surely haunting the U.S. in Iraq, as Tony Burman wrote here last week. But something scary and vague is always haunting the U.S.: not just the sellout at Munich, the Berlin Wall, or the battle of Little Big Horn. Maybe it's hauntedness itself. I happened to rewatch Apocalypse Now last week, Coppola's Vietnam epic based on Conrad's Heart of Darkness, about colonialism in Africa. "The horror, the horror," breathes Brando hauntingly at the end. U.S. policy always manages to metaphysicalize itself out of specifics and into abstractions.

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Prime Minister Stephen Harper in Afghanistan in 2009, enjoying a Tim Hortons cof
| April 20, 2015
Image: Wikimedia commons
| April 7, 2015

How Canada lets people get tortured

Guantanamo Diary

by Mohamedou Ould Slahi
(Little, Brown and Company,
2015;
$32.00)

Following December's release of the U.S. Senate report on American complicity in torture, Prime Minister Stephen Harper quickly declared, "It has nothing to do whatsoever with the government of Canada." Despite the CIA's close relationship with Canadian state security agencies, as well as two judicial inquiries finding Ottawa complicit in the torture of Canadian citizens in Syria and Egypt, Harper preferred to ignore the facts.   

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Redeye

Bill C-51 a threat to all Canadians

March 30, 2015
| The Harper government has been forced to respond to the outcry about Bill C-51 and propose a handful of amendments. But the changes won't satisfy the concerns of the BC Civil Liberties Association.
Length: 15:32 minutes (14.23 MB)

Open letter: Four key reasons why we oppose Bill C-51

Photo: flickr/Gabriel Luneau

We are lawyers, activists, academics, and others who are gravely concerned about Bill C-51, which introduces national security-related amendments to several Canadian laws. We oppose the Bill, because it is overbroad, grants unchecked powers to government agencies, and allows for the unqualified infringements on the rights of people in Canada.

Some key deficiencies in Bill C-51 include:

1. Its overbroad definition of "threats"

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March 23, 2015 |
Is there a need to create a broad and vague definition of terrorism that police and CSIS may one day use to label organizations a "criminal threat" to Canada's economy or "infrastructure?"
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