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Rachel Notley
| June 23, 2015

Soon-to-be lawyer wins right to wear regalia when she is called to the bar

Photo: Christina Gray with permission

Christina Gray will set a strong precedent when she is called to the bar this week.

In a sea of black barristers' robes at Toronto's Roy Thomson Hall, Gray, a proud member of the Lax Kw'alaams Tsimshian, will be wearing her woollen black and red Tsimshian button blanket and her cedar hat. On her back there will be a hand-sewn killer whale, representing her clan.

The regalia represents her Tsimshian culture, laws, ways of being and history, said Gray.

Gray will be the first in Ontario to wear First Nations regalia instead of the traditional barristers' robes when called to the bar on Tuesday.

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We need to stand up for justice for residential schools survivors

It's on the rest of us to stand up for the truth and ensure Canadians know everything that happened in the schools covered in this report and the ones not yet exposed.

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Canada needs to implement the TRC recommendations

In light of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, Canada's record suggests that the Indian problem was more about Indians refusing to die off, than maintaining different languages and cultures.

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| June 2, 2015

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Photo: flickr/ Neeta Lind

Next week will mark the end of government funding to investigate the truth and impact of residential schools through the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (TRC). The TRC's goals were to educate Canadians about this dark part of our history and support the healing of residential school survivors.

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The KAIROS Blanket Exercise in action
| May 13, 2015
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