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Photo: Benjamin J. DeLong/flickr
| May 18, 2016
Image: Flickr/Oran Viriyincy
| January 18, 2016
Photo: flickr/alex
| March 20, 2015
Redeye

The complete street: A new model for urban planning

February 23, 2015
| Bike lanes, wider sidewalks and lower speed limits are some of the design features that can make a street into a space that is comfortable for all users, not just drivers.
Length: 15:05 minutes (13.82 MB)
Columnists

An alternative to the old, non-visionary tax-wasting treadmill for Nova Scotia

Photo: Glenn Euloth/flickr

If we can get past the hype and acknowledge that the new convention centre for downtown Halifax doesn't add up in economic terms, perhaps we could then move to bigger questions about the politics that too often lead the taxpayer to the slaughterhouse.

In the way it came about -- taking the word of promoters and ignoring everything else -- the convention centre is not only not alone, but is a throwback to the backfired economic non-salvations of the past 50 years.

The word "vision" is thrown around a lot these days as the ingredient that we lack in Nova Scotia. The Ivany commission on the new economy used it in its rousing sermon exhorting us to get our act together.

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Site of the proposed convention centre in downtown Halifax. Photo: Emma Feltes
| April 30, 2014
Photo: AJ Batac/flickr
| April 30, 2014

Canadian cities and the future of democracy

Photo: flickr/Paul Krueger

The tipping point for cities likely went unnoticed. It could have been a baby born in a large hospital in Lagos. It might have been a Chinese farmer moving to Shanghai. Or perhaps it was the quiet passing of a grandparent in the Amazon.

Whatever it was, the result was dramatic. In 2009 and for the first time in history, more people lived inside urban areas than outside of them. Where are we five years later? 

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We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

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Columnists

Last chance to stop Halifax convention centre follies

Photo: Jamie Moore/flickr

Finally, unease about the Halifax convention centre -- which will cost taxpayers nearly $400 million over the next 25 years -- has a chance to come to proper public attention.

The developer, Rank Inc., is asking for 20 changes to the project that would have the effect of making some of the subsidized convention centre facilities smaller than originally planned, and the privately financed office and hotel space on top of it much bigger, thereby trampling further over already much-abused city bylaws. Halifax Regional Municipality has asked for public input April 29 at 6 p.m.

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We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

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Redeye

Exploding some of the myths about gentrification

October 20, 2013
| David Madden argues that gentrification is not synonymous with urban renewal. Madden is an assistant professor in the Sociology Department and the Cities Program at the London School of Economics.
Length: 15:46 minutes (14.44 MB)
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