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Three years later, Fukushima nuclear disaster continues to serve as a warning

Photo: Randy Woolsey/flickr

Three years have passed since the earthquake and tsunami that caused the nuclear disaster at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan. The tsunami's immediate death toll was more than 15,000, with close to 3,000 still missing. Casualties are still mounting, though, both in Japan and much farther away. The impact of the Fukushima nuclear meltdown on health and the environment is severe, compounded daily as radioactive pollution continues to pour from the site, owned by the Tokyo Electric Power Company, TEPCO.

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Growing support for Omar Khadr's freedom and next steps to justice

Photo: flickr/howlmontreal

Despite recent legal setbacks in Omar Khadr’s long struggle for justice, there is a growing wave of Canadian and international support from those who believe in his innocence, who are outraged at the gross injustice he has suffered and who demand his immediate release.

Equally encouraging are two voices from the U.S. military, Dr. Stephen Xenakis a retired Brigadier-General, and Sam Morison a lawyer with the U.S. Department of Defense, who recently travelled to Edmonton, where Khadr is currently detained in a maximum-security prison, to share their opinion that Khadr should be released.

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Growing epidemic of sexual assault in the U.S. military

Photo Illustration: Lance Page / t r u t h o u t/flickr

Rape is centre stage this week after the dramatic rescue of three women from close to a decade of imprisonment in a house on a quiet street in Cleveland. The suspect, Ariel Castro, has been charged with kidnap and rape. These horrific allegations have shocked the nation, and demand a full investigation and a vigorous prosecution.

Also this week, the Pentagon released a shocking new report on rape and sexual assault in the U.S. military. According to the latest available figures, an estimated average of 70 sexual assaults are committed daily within the U.S. military, or 26,000 per year. The number of actually reported sexual assaults for the Pentagon's fiscal year 2012 was 3,374. Of that number, only 190 were sent to a court-martial proceeding.

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Wikileaks' new release The Kissinger Cables and Bradley Manning

Photo: cliff1066™/Flickr

Wikileaks has released a new trove of documents, more than 1.7 million U.S. State Department cables dating from 1973-1976, which they have dubbed "The Kissinger Cables," after Henry Kissinger, who in those years served as secretary of state and assistant to the president for national security affairs.

One cable includes a transcribed conversation where Kissinger displays remarkable candor: "Before the Freedom of Information Act, I used to say at meetings, 'The illegal we do immediately; the unconstitutional takes a little longer.' [laughter] But since the Freedom of Information Act, I'm afraid to say things like that."

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Film pulls back curtain on Obama's 'Dirty Wars'

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Bradley Manning speaks in preliminary hearing of court-martial

Image: Jared Rodriguez/Truthout

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The terrorizing occupation of Afghanistan

We may never know what drove a U.S. Army staff sergeant to head out into the Afghan night and allegedly murder at least 16 civilians in their homes, among them nine children and three women. The massacre near Belambai, in Kandahar, Afghanistan, has shocked the world and intensified the calls for an end to the longest war in U.S. history. The attack has been called tragic, which it surely is. But when Afghans attack U.S. forces, they are called "terrorists." That is, perhaps, the inconsistency at the core of U.S. policy, that democracy can be delivered through the barrel of a gun, that terrorism can be fought by terrorizing a nation.

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Redeye

Villagers fight back against naval base on Korea's Jeju Island

March 2, 2012
| The South Korean government is building a naval base designed for ships equipped with technology essential for the U.S. missile defence system.
Length: 15:56
Columnists

Truth, lies and the Afghan war

Eight youths, tending their flock of sheep in the snowy fields of Afghanistan, were exterminated last week by a NATO airstrike. They were in the Najrab district of Kapisa province in eastern Afghanistan. Most were reportedly between the ages of 6 and 14. They had sought shelter near a large boulder, and had built a fire to stay warm. At first, NATO officials claimed they were armed men. The Afghan government condemned the bombing and released photos of some of the victims. By Wednesday, NATO offered, in a press release, "deep regret to the families and loved ones of several Afghan youths who died during an air engagement in Kapisa province Feb. 8." Those eight killed were not that different in age from Lance Cpl. Osbrany Montes De Oca, 20, of North Arlington, N.J.

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Bradley Manning's pre-trial military hearing and possible death sentence

thierry ehrmann (CC-BY)

Accused whistle-blower Pvt. Bradley Manning turned 24 Saturday. He spent his birthday in a pre-trial military hearing that could ultimately lead to a sentence of life ... or death. Manning stands accused of causing the largest leak of government secrets in United States history.

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