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Lesser evil voting: A new political term hitting a raw nerve

Image: Andrew Comings/flickr

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There's this to be said for Trump v. Clinton, now upon us: it's contributed a new political acronym, LEV, for Lesser Evil Voting. I think Noam Chomsky coined it, with collaborator John Halle. I can't find other sources.

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October 21, 2015 |
Liberals won a majority with 39.5 per cent of the popular vote and more than half of all voters were unable to cast an effective ballot.
October 16, 2015 |
Fair Vote Canada commends the NDP for including proportional representation in their final election platform.
Columnists

Progressives' post-election task: Organizing for change

Photo: Sally T. Buck/flickr

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Columnists

Does the Swedish voting system exemplify democracy?

Photo: flickr/Vox Efx

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Excerpt: Historical reformers: Why and how democratic institutions change

Wrestling with Democracy: Voting Systems as Politics in the 20th Century West

by Dennis Pilon
(University of Toronto Press Publishing,
2013;
$37.95)

The following is an excerpt from the new book Wrestling with Democracy: Voting Systems as Politics in the 20th Century West, which examines why voting systems have or have not changed in western industrialized countries over the past century.

embedded_video

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| February 12, 2013
Columnists

Stop Harper, how? An alternative form of political co-operation

Photo: jonathonreed/Flickr

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So you want to stop Harper. Happily, you stand with a solid majority of Canadians, who are unhappy with what he represents. His government has the support of only about one Canadian in three.

Unfortunately, the opposition to his regime, a.k.a. one-man rule, is divided. Four opposition parties share prospective anti-Harper voters. Not everybody who wants to stop Harper is as engaged politically as Brigette DePape, the page who was terminated for brandishing a Stop Harper sign on the floor of the Senate.

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| August 23, 2012
Columnists

Voting rights and dreams deferred in U.S. elections

Photo: Heather Katsoulis/Flickr

People remember 1929 as the year of the stock market crash and the beginning of the Great Depression, the global economic disaster which remains the only one in history that dwarfs the one in which we now find ourselves. It was also the year Martin Luther King Jr. was born, who wouldn't live to see 40 years. And it was the year that Langston Hughes graduated from Lincoln University, outside Philadelphia.

Hughes, the grandson of abolitionists and voting-rights activists, was an African-American writer. His poem "A Dream Deferred" begins:

"What happens to a dream deferred?

Does it dry up

like a raisin in the sun?

Or fester like a sore—

And then run?"

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