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Comparing fiscal federalism and revenue distribution in Canada and Australia

Photo: Nicki Mannix/flickr

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Photo: Alexandra Studio/Toronto History/flickr
| March 24, 2016
Columnists

Will the NDP take on corporate power? It's time to choose.

Photo: Laurel L. Russwurm/flickr

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Across Canada, NDP federal riding associations are meeting in preparation for an April 8-10 Edmonton convention, where there will be a leadership review.

In a January 22 statement, Tom Mulcair said the party needs to focus on income inequality.

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Photo: Norris Wong/flickr
| January 27, 2016
Columnists

Extreme wealth, the plutocrats and Canada

Image: Mike Licht/flickr

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| September 1, 2015
Columnists

It's counterintuitive, but tax the rich, not the poor

Photo: Eric L/flickr

Take some money from the wealthy, give it to the poor -- why not do it? Basic accounting suggests that another $1,000 for a student with a $10,000 yearly income puts them further ahead than the same amount does for someone earning $100,000. After all, it gives the student a boost of 10 per cent, and the affluent person only one per cent.

In Canada, the small amount of income redistributed to the poor has long been a matter of public debate. Lately, the poor have been losing. The low-tax, small-government crowd, both Liberal and Conservative, have had control of the federal government for decades.

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Columnists

Can we stop subsidizing executive stock options and enriching the rich?

Photo: Ahmad Nawawi/flickr

If you're a top executive at a major corporation, no need to read further; you'll know all this.

But if you're an ordinary person, you may not. You've probably heard of "executive stock options" -- a perk that allows corporate executives a special deal on purchasing the company's stocks.

And you may suspect that these stock options are connected to the rampant greed and corruption that have plagued the corporate world in recent years. If so, you'd be right.

Even leading business thinkers agree.

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Columnists

From the grid to energy democracy: Making the renewables transition

Photo: epSos .de/flickr

When Naomi Klein spoke about her book This Changes Everything at the Hammer Museum in Los Angeles in September 2014, she was asked if she agrees with James Hansen's support for nuclear power. She began by crediting Dr. Hansen -- a scientist who worked for decades at the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration -- with doing more than anyone else to alert the public to the dangers of climate change. 

Klein then added that she does not agree with Hansen that nuclear power is part of the solution:

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face2face

Bradley Pierik on wealth, water and the marketplace

April 22, 2015
| Today we talk about water, social enterprise and rational optimism. Bradley tells us about his passion for clean water and why he believes that more equality is fundamentally a good thing.
Length: 45:20 minutes (51.9 MB)
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