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| January 21, 2017
Columnists

W.H. Auden's poetry resonates on Trump's inauguration day

Image: Roger Doherty/flickr

How did Auden (W.H.) get it so right? He died in 1973, but his lines come to mind during the 21st century's most wracked moments.

Sept. 1, 1939, was written around that date from "one of the dives/ On Fifty-second Street" in New York, at the end of "a low dishonest decade," the 1930s. It included the Great Depression and the global spread of fascism, with World War Two just ahead. Fair enough, he was there.

But on Sept. 11, 2001, with Auden long dead, his poem seemed to rise from the rubble in Manhattan -- reprinted, quoted, viral etc. That was at the end of a proud, boastful decade, which followed the Soviet Union's demise, with smug Western declarations of victory and much reaping of economic spoils.

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Not Rex: The coming dark age of Trump

Not Rex delivers an alternative poem in the epic style on the coming dark age of Trump.

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Image: Wikimedia Commons/Pete Souza
| January 17, 2017
Columnists

U.S. Senate should reject Jeff Sessions again, 30 years later

Photo: Gage Skidmore/flickr

The arc of U.S. history is on full display as the peaceful transition of power takes place from the administration of President Barack Obama to that of incoming president-elect Donald Trump. The first African-American president is about to hand the reins of power to the very man who led the racist "birther" campaign to delegitimize his presidency. As Trump continues to shock the world with his middle-of-the-night tweets, the flurry of Senate confirmation hearings exposed the hollow rhetoric of Trump's pledge to "drain the swamp." Among the controversial and divisive cabinet nominees is his pick for attorney general: Jeff Sessions, the junior senator from Alabama.

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Columnists

Trump's proven that free trade deals can be rewritten. So let's write better ones.

Photo: Billie Greenwood/flickr

For years, we've been told the dictates of globalization, and the intrusive and prescriptive terms of free trade agreements in particular, are immutable, natural, and unquestionable. When workers were displaced by the migration of multinational capital toward more profitable jurisdictions, we were told there's nothing we can do about it except join the race to the bottom in a desperate attempt to hang onto our jobs. When investment and employment were undermined by lopsided trade and capital flows, and employers and financiers utilized the leverage afforded them by unrestrained international mobility to ratchet the distributional structure of the economy ever-more-blatantly in their own favour, we were informed this was just the logic of markets. And anyone who questioned

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| January 10, 2017

Report about U.S. and Russian interference in elections

I am furious about Russia's actions during the previous United States election, mostly because I came to Canada from the United States and hate what Trump stands for.  On Sunday, I listened to Michael Enright's essay on the inherent hypocrisy in this condementation given the history of election interference by the United States.   I found the story interesting but found it one-sided--what about intervention by the former Soviet Union??  What about the other European powers?

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Oneil Carlier
| January 9, 2017
Image: PMO/Adam Scotti
| January 5, 2017
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