Occupy Wall Street: The game of colonialism and the left

| October 1, 2011
Occupy Wall Street: The game of colonialism and the left

The "Occupy Wall Street" slogan has gone viral and international now. From the protests on the streets of Wall Street in the name of "ending capitalism" -- organizers, protesters, and activists have been encouraged to "occupy" different places that symbolize greed and power. There's just one problem: The United States is already being occupied. This is Indigenous land. And it's been occupied for quite some time now. I also need to mention that New York City is Haudenosaunee territory and home to many other First Nations. Waiting to see if that's been mentioned anywhere.

Not that I'm surprised that this was a misstep in organizing against Wall Street or really any organizing that happens when the "left" decides that it's going to "take back America for the people" (which people?!). This is part of a much larger issue, and in fact there is so much nationalistic, patriotic language of imperialism wrapped up in these types of campaigns that it's no wonder people can't see the erasure of existence of the First Peoples of THIS territory that happens when we get all high and mighty with the pro-America agendas, and forget our OWN complicity and accountability to the way things are today -- not just the corporations and the state.

Let me be clear. I'm not against ending capitalism and I'm not against people organizing to hold big corporations accountable for the extreme damage they are causing. Yes, we need to end globalization. What I am saying is that I have all kinds of problems when to get to "ending capitalism" we step on other people's rights -- and in this case erode Indigenous rights -- to make the point. I'm not saying people did it intentionally but that doesn't even matter -- good intentions are not enough and good intentions obviously can have adverse affects. This is such a played out old record too, walking on other people's backs to get to a mystical land of equity. Is it really just and equitable when specific people continue to be oppressed to get there? And it doesn't have to be done! We don't need more occupation -- we need decolonization and it's everyone's responsibility to participate in that because colonialism affects everyone. Everyone! Colonialism also leads to capitalism, globalization, and industrialization. How can we truly end capitalism without ending colonialism? How does doing things in the name of "America" which was created by the imposition of hierarchies of class, race, ability, gender, and sexuality help that?

I can't get on board with the nationalism of an "American" (or now "Canadian!") revolution -- I just can't. There has been too much genocide and violence for the United States and Canada to be founded and to continue to exist as nation states. I think John Paul Montano, Anishnaabe writer captured it quite well in his Open Letter to Occupy Wall Street Activists:

"I hope you would make mention of the fact that the very land upon which you are protesting does not belong to you -- that you are guests upon that stolen indigenous land. I had hoped mention would be made of the indigenous nation whose land that is. I had hoped that you would address the centuries-long history that we indigenous peoples of this continent have endured being subject to the countless '-isms' of do-gooders claiming to be building a "more just society," a "better world," a "land of freedom" on top of our indigenous societies, on our indigenous lands, while destroying and/or ignoring our ways of life. I had hoped that you would acknowledge that, since you are settlers on indigenous land, you need and want our indigenous consent to your building anything on our land -- never mind an entire society."

I will leave you with this new art piece from Erin Konsmo (also pictured above), our fabulous intern at The Native Youth Sexual Health Network, created on "Occupy: The Game of Colonialism." Hopefully you get the picture now.

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