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Anti-Virus Software

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Frustrated Mess
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Joined: Feb 23 2005

Not that I want to help anyone with Windows, but ... an excellent and free AV program is ClamWin. Google it (http://www.clamwin.com/). And it is always free. More than that, google a bit more and you can find a Linux LiveCD (https://launchpad.net/clamav-livecd) version that can be used to boot a machine with windows installed and then scan it for windows viruses (viri?). It helped me out in a pinch more than once.

 


Unbiased
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Joined: May 2 2007
Brian White wrote:


But you should not have to read HAL's mind to install a program. Installing should have a standard simple method.

And that is My problem with Linux .
I started playing with Linux in 2003 and I so wanted (and still do) for it to be a valid alternative to Windoze. I am still waiting. I think it was Tulip which drove me nuts. \
I still check to see if it will fulfill my needs.
Hopefully someday it will find a way to kill the windows hegemony.
In the meantime I use XP which I have to say is pretty stable.

As for Vista ? LOL// (God .. I hate using LOL in a post) but Vista ... ?

My mother got stuck using Vista after buying a Dell. So sad.
All the new puters come preloaded with it.

(A side note)
Dell and many other hardware suppliers are forced to pre-install Vista now with Msoft's present aftersale agreements.
It sickens me.
and,,. relating to THIS thread.. ?
Dell automatically installs McAffee antivirus !
I purchased a new laptop from them and specifically told them not to install Mcaffey..
Did they acceed ?
Nope../
I had to delete it myself.

thanks
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Joined: Mar 21 2009

thanks for the useful info here.

i recently dealt with some problems along these lines, and have done some of the things noted above, but was also told by several people who work in internet 'security' stuff that even when all is said and done, anything can be hacked.  this is true for wireless, for router-connected systems (even with 'security' passwords), etc. 

a lot of 'wireless' stuff in our area actually connects up to an internet tower down the road, and from there to the hydro lines. 

the message i got is that a) use the good security measures available, b) even still, work under the assumption that everything on the internet is an open book.


Brian White
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Joined: Jan 26 2005

My gf has a antivirus program with a spinning globe ikon, either avast or  agv. Anyways, I put another thing on her puter to stop other spyware.  I ocassionally run it. More for dodgey cookies and "other" stuff that is not technically viruses.

Well yesterday it picked up a virus that the other one missed. It is called asquared and it is the free version where you have to download the updates manually and order scans manually too.

By the way, downadup and conficker is the same thing.  I have seen another computer with antivirus. It was running slow and the lady thought something was amiss.  I put something else on it and it was absolutely CRAWLING with downadup!  It was the antivirus for win98 thread in this forum. The antivirus had not picked up the downadup at all!

It was also full of active X stuff to steal paswords etc.

So be warned, antivirus may give you nag screens every 4 minutes but perhaps it also gives you a false sense of security.

Turn off your computer on april 1 because you are going to get conficked if you don't! 


G. Muffin
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Joined: Sep 28 2008

wwSwimming wrote:

PC tools Anti Virus, free edition 

http://www.pctools.com/free-antivirus/

 i've been using it for about a year, got tired of paying for Norton & Kaspersky.

Okay, it's that time of the year again and AVG is cancelling their free edition effective December 1.  I looked at the PC Tools one but it seems you can't get the free version without signing up for buying an unrelated product.

Any other suggestions for free anti-viral software?


no1important
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Joined: Mar 29 2005

you can get computers equipped with Linux....but....you will find many of your programs wont work. I also tried it and it was a pain in the ass.

 

Windows  has it flaws but at least we get  updates....

============

 

Iget updates regularily with Ubuntu.  Like what programmes won't work other than Outlook express, IE or Windows office? Firefox, thunderbird, open office are all superior anyways, even for windows users.

I really do not know why people say Linux is hard for, I have been using it for almost 10 years now and I do not find a pain. I wouold never go back to bloated wiondoze if you paid me a billion bucks.


Brian White
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Joined: Jan 26 2005

I use ubuntu on the net and windows rarely for a few programs where there is no linux alternative. (Mostly that is sony vegas for editing home movies to put on youtube).  Over the years there have been less and less issues.  "wine" keeps improving so you can do quite a bit of windows programs on ubuntu too.

And you get very regular updates and you can do it automatically.  I even figured out how to use open office to do business cards recently. (It was silly because it has wzards that need a tweak to produce the right result). Another thing that windows does better for me is printing. (I think that depends on your printer)

Another option is windows on one computer and a linux netbook for emails etc. (Though I do not see them for sale anymore).  My girlfriend has a reasonably high powered xp laptop and I get on the net using my wireless connection on my lowly first generation acer netboo a couple of minutes before her antivirus lets her go on. 2 minutes for me and at least 5 for her! 

Brian

G. Pie wrote:

wwSwimming wrote:

PC tools Anti Virus, free edition 

http://www.pctools.com/free-antivirus/

 i've been using it for about a year, got tired of paying for Norton & Kaspersky.

Okay, it's that time of the year again and AVG is cancelling their free edition effective December 1.  I looked at the PC Tools one but it seems you can't get the free version without signing up for buying an unrelated product.

Any other suggestions for free anti-viral software?


mmphosis
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Joined: Apr 28 2009

I don't use Anti-Virus software.

In decades of supporting computers, I've only very rarely seen anti-virus software find a virus. I haven't encountered the need to use Anti-Virus software when using Mac OS X and Linux/BSD.  They are not totally immune to malware, no system is.

When I do use Windows, I do not install anti-virus software. I do use firewalls. I do keep all of the software up to date as possible. And, I may install ad-aware software. But, anti-virus software seems invasive.  The worst is Norton.  Norton will degrade your system, and I think that it's upgrade path is viral in itself.  Instead of having software running all of the time that degrades my system, I'd rather run a virus scan from time to time.

FREE Dr.Web LiveCD To Scan and Remove Virus Without Starting Windows

Another method is to use sandboxes.  I think that both Mac OS X/Leopard and Windows Vista/7 use sandboxes to some extent to contain malicious software.  I sometimes run Windows within a Virtual Machine which can contain access to resources on my real system.


radiorahim
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Joined: Jun 17 2002

You can use the Avast anti-virus software on your Microsoft Windows machine.

The "home" edition is freeware (as opposed to "free software").    What you are required to do is to register it and get a serial number that needs to be renewed every year.

I've found it to be the least intrusive of the various anti-virus programmes required to protect Windows machines.

But, your best bet is to as much as humanly possible keep Windows disconnected from the internet.   It's never really been designed as a multi-user networked operating system....it was always sort of an afterthought...and that explains alot of the security problems that Windows has.

 


radiorahim
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Joined: Jun 17 2002

Looks like Clamwin is coming along these days.    I hadn't looked at it in awhile.   Clamwin IS "free software" developed by the community and licensed under the GNU General Public License.

It doesn't yet have an "online" scanner i.e. it isn't constantly scanning your machine for malware as does most of the proprietary anti-virus software.   You have to do scans manually (mind you it's really good at virus detection). But now you can at least "schedule" regular virus scans.

Even if Clamwin doesn't meet your needs right now, keep checking back because as free software, its constantly under development.

 


N.Beltov
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Joined: May 25 2003

There are two computers in my place, one of which is my laptop. I run a recent Ubuntu distro of GNU/Linux and don't need any of that anti-virus, anti-malware clutter when I'm using the Linux OS. However, I must admit that it is set up as a dual boot (either Linux or Windows Vista so I can wean myself from Windows and still retain that %$#* operating system for the less and less frequent occassion when I have no other choice.) and so I have anti-virus installed and running when using Windows. 


So, on the other PC and when my laptop runs with Windows, I use the anti-virus software provided by the ISP (Shaw). I used to use Crap Cleaner and Ad-Aware (freeware, I think) as well, but after some discussion with one of the local PC repair guys, I've dumped those two. They mess with the registry too much. I've kept Spybot - Search and Destroy (freeware) and I've also added MalwareBytes Anti-Malware which has been good so far. The anti-virus software from my ISP runs in the background (of course) but the other two (Spybot and MalwareBytes) are only run when I choose to run them.

Finally, the internet connection is filtered through a router and so there is a firewall as well. The router provides a wireless connection to the laptop and so, naturally, I have a router password for security.

The best thing I've done, however, is to make sure that my nephew doesn't have administrator access on the PC. It was a struggle but it was worth it. :)


radiorahim
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Joined: Jun 17 2002

N.Beltov wrote:

 

The best thing I've done, however, is to make sure that my nephew doesn't have administrator access on the PC. It was a struggle but it was worth it. :)

This is a key thing to do.

By default, Windows gives every user administrative privileges...and once you've given every user administrative privileges it's really hard to remove them.

Better to restrict "other" users on your Windows computer from the get go by giving them "limited" accounts that don't allow them to make major changes to the machine.   The other users will hate you for it...but it's one of the best preventive maintenance things you can do.  That way you only have to deal with your own screwups and not everyone elses.  Wink

 

 


G. Muffin
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Joined: Sep 28 2008

radiorahim wrote:
You can use the Avast anti-virus software on your Microsoft Windows machine.

Thanks, radiorahim.  This is what I ended up going with.

Quote:
But, your best bet is to as much as humanly possible keep Windows disconnected from the internet.

Would you expand on this, please?  For instance, is it important to close IE when I'm not using the computer? 


radiorahim
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Joined: Jun 17 2002

G. Pie wrote:

Would you expand on this, please?  For instance, is it important to close IE when I'm not using the computer? 

First of all, Internet Explorer is the most risky web browser to be using for the simple reason that it's integrated into your Windows operating system.   If IE gets messed up, it can mess up your operating system.

Over the last couple of decades, Microsoft has managed to convince most computer users that viruses, spyware, browser hijackers, worms etc. and running the resource hogging software applications to combat them, are a "norrmal" part of using a computer. 

For those of us who run non-Microsoft operating systems, be it MacOS or a GNU/Linux system, malware is something that is extremely rare.

So, there are a number of ways to setup your PC so that it runs both Windows and GNU/Linux.   Use GNU/Linux when connected to the internet and then use Windows for non-internet "Windows only" kinds of programmes like multimedia games.

I won't go into great detail here, but you might find a local "geek" who can help you do this...there are also some links in the "Free Software Free Society" thread that you might want to take a look at as well.

 


G. Muffin
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Joined: Sep 28 2008

Okay, thanks.


N.Beltov
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Joined: May 25 2003

G. Pie, you can also make your PC or laptop safer by simply using a different browser within the context of using a Windows Operating System (OS).

Avoid using Internet Explorer by installing, e.g., Mozilla Firefox, make Firefox your default browser, and use it as much as you can. You can update the Microsoft browser if you like, just don't use it much or at all.


radiorahim
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Joined: Jun 17 2002

There's a thread dealing with alternatives to Internet Explorer here

There are lots of alternatives...play with them till you find one that you really like.


G. Muffin
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Joined: Sep 28 2008

I don't know if you guys realize how cowed some of us are by technology.  It's a really, really big deal to install a new browser. 


N.Beltov
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Joined: May 25 2003

If you've got an older or slower machine then, yea, you need to figure out if the new browser will actually work. But if you search around the website then that question can be answered. It's not really that hard. Just find a block of time when you're alert and work your way through

1. pick the other browser you want

2. figuring out if the install will work on your machine (space on Hard Drive, RAM, and maybe what version of Windows you have)

3. download the big file onto your windows desktop (using IE because that's your only browser right now!)

4. stop running anything else on your PC

5. click on the big file you've downloaded

6. work through the steps and read each step

7. try out the new browser, maybe move your bookmarks, and

8. make the new browser your default browser. Don't try to delete IE. Just don't use it if you can avoid it.

FIN


G. Muffin
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Joined: Sep 28 2008

N.Beltov wrote:
Just find a block of time when you're alert ....

Oy.


N.Beltov
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Joined: May 25 2003

I've seen people try to do a large and complicated install just before they go to bed. Hell, I did it once myself. Don't do that. Maybe things will be as smooth as a baby's bottom ... and maybe not.


radiorahim
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Joined: Jun 17 2002

G. Pie...you managed to install Avast anti-virus on your computer.   I can assure you that installing a new anti-virus programme is much more complicated than installing a new web browser.


G. Muffin
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Joined: Sep 28 2008

radiorahim wrote:
G. Pie...you managed to install Avast anti-virus on your computer.   I can assure you that installing a new anti-virus programme is much more complicated than installing a new web browser.

Well, Avast was a piece of cake so this is good news.


Fidel
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Joined: Apr 29 2004

Breakout! Swing out, my internet brothers and sisters. And that reminds me of my favourite pop song from 1986,or 87?. Or whatever. Brrrrrrrrrrreak out!


Michelle
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Joined: May 10 2001

Firefox is really simple.

Close all browsers and programs.

Click on the "download now" button on this page.

Once you've downloaded the file, double-click on it, hit "run", and follow the (very few) directions, and it's installed!


Stargazer
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Joined: Jun 9 2004

To Dos for keeping your Windblowz computer safe:

1) Get rid of Internet Explorer. Instead use Firefox. Install the Add-On which will tell you and/or block you from going to an unsafe sites.

2) Get a decent AV program - avast, Clam, Kapersky, AVG

3) Download and install Spybot

4) Firewall - very important. Zome Alarm is fairly decent

5) Harden your windows which means turning off services that allow others to connect remotely etc.

6) Update your Windblowz on a regular basis with the critical updates

7) If you use Office, make sure that you update that too with critical patches

8) Rename your guest account. Too many ways for people to access an opened Guest account

9) Create multiple profiles, one for Administrator and the rest for limited use (if you have kids you may want to stop them from adding malware in the form of games, party poker, iwin, etc.

Hardening Windows: a step by step guide:

http://www.5starsupport.com/tutorial/hardening-windows.htm

 


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