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The Militarization of Aid to Haiti

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NDPP
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Joined: Dec 28 2008

Silent Coup in Haiti

http://www.dominionpaper.ca/articles/3654

"While mainstream media has focused public attention on ineligible candidates such as Hip-hop artist Wyclef Jean, the most popular political party in Haiti, Fanmi Lavalas, has been banned from the November 28, 2010 Presidential and Parliamentary elections..

'Lavalas has won every election they've run in, but the US, French and Canadian Governments all have interests in Haiti and don't want to see the Lavalas agenda put forward..'"


Left Turn
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Haiti cholera toll tops 250, but seen stabilizing

Quote:
PORT-AU-PRINCE (Reuters) - A cholera epidemic in Haiti has killed more than 250 people, the government said on Sunday, but it added the outbreak which has sickened more than 3,000 may be stabilizing with fewer deaths and new cases reported over the last 24 hours.


NDPP
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Haiti Cholera Epidemic Reaches Port Au Prince

http://www.wsws.org/articles/2010/oct2010/hait-o26.shtml

"The cholera epidemic that broke out last week in Central Haiti, so far killing 259 people, has now reached Port Au Prince...A September report from Refugees International called the relief operation 'dysfunctional' concluding that 'the people of Haiti are still living in a state of emergency with a humanitarian response that appears paralyzed'.

Haiti: UN MINUSTAH Forces Crack Down on Anti-Occupation Demonstraters

http://www.haiti-liberte.com/front_cover_news_of_the_week_english.asp

"It was tense in Port au Prince on Friday, Oct 15. UN troops fired shots in the air and traded blows with a crowd of some 100 demonstrators gathered outside the UN base at the Port au Prince airport to protest the renewal of the UN Mission to Stabilize Haiti. (MINUSTAH). Everywhere you go in this city, there's evidence of the animosity many feel toward the UN presence. The ubiquitous graffitti slogans of 'DOWN WITH THE OCCUPATION!' or DOWN WITH UN THIEVES!' reflect the population's opinion of the UN troops presence here..."

 


Fidel
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Cholera Epidemic: Toxic Drinking Water Killing Haitians 
Real Aid is Blocked

Quote:
A cholera epidemic has just killed 284 Haitians and at least 3,612 more are infected and may die. This cholera is caused by drinking dirty toxic water."

More evidence that the "freest trading nation in the Caribbean" needs socialism not bullshit neoliberal colonialism.


NDPP
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Joined: Dec 28 2008

There was LOTS of money raised - why no clean drinking water? Where the hell did all the aid money go? NGOs ( Not Giving Over ) the donations to those that need it, AGAIN?


NDPP
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CDC: Haiti Cholera Matches South Asia Strain

http://axisoflogic.com/artman/publish/Article_61547.shtml

"Finally, Forbes and other corporate media have joined the chorus, reporting on UN responsibility for the genesis of cholera in Haiti..."


NDPP
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Haitian Anger Over Cholera (and vid)

http://english.aljazeera.net/news/americas/2010/11/2010111204519840752.html

"Residents of the largest slum in Haiti's capital Port-au-Prince have been demonstrating over the country's response to the cholera outbreak. They also vented their anger at NGOs operating in the country...The Pan American Health Organisation, the regional office of the UN's World Health Organisation has warned Haiti to expect hundreds of thousands of cases now that the disease appears to have taken hold.."

This from rabble.ca frontpage - Like New Orleans, this is an example of a rescue operation that never was and ethnic cleansing at its best/worst. A cruel, deliberate fiasco. Lots of Canadian involvement too naturally.


Fidel
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Failure of social democracy? Haiti is a modern day colony and proof that there is, in fact, no democracy at all. The war on democracy continues.


NDPP
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Anger Erupts at UN as Cholera Toll Nears 1,000

http://ipsnews.net/news.asp?idnews=53567

"Demonstrators blame foreign peacekeepers for introducing the infectious disease into the country. The US Center for Disease Control and Prevention says the strain of cholera bacteria spreading in Haiti matches the one endemic in South Asia. An estimated 400,000 people could be sickened before the epidemic is brought under control, an effort that could take up to six months.."

Bill Clinton: Haiti's Neo Colonial Overlord

http://www.opednews.com/articles/Bill-Clinton-Haiti-s-Neoc-by-Ashley-Smi...

"Bill Clinton is no friend to Haiti. The former president who inflicted great harm to the Haitian people while in office, now acts as a kind of regent, promoting sweatshops, tourism, and export-oriented agriculture. A primary actor in stripping Haiti of its sovereignty, Clinton is putting Haiti up for sale to multinational capital.."


Fidel
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Protesters Shot Dead as Haiti Cholera Toll Tops 1,000

The "freest trading nation" in the Caribbean under Washington's spell.


M. Spector
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Joined: Feb 19 2005

Fidel Castro wrote:
Yesterday I explained that in Haiti 1,523 persons had died as a result of cholera and at the same time, the measures adopted by the Party and Government of Cuba.

I didn't think I would be writing anything today about the problem. However I give up that idea in order to write a short Reflection on the subject.

Dr. Lea Guido, PHO-WHO representative in Cuba -at this moment is representing both organizations in two countries and is a person with a wealth of experience - stated this afternoon that under current conditions Haiti can expect that the epidemic will affect 400,000 persons.

On the other hand, the Deputy Minister of Health of Cuba and Chief of the Cuban Medical Mission, our country's ambassador in Haiti and other comrades in the mission, have been meeting all day with President René Preval, Dr. Lea Guido, the Haitian Minister of Health and other officials from Cuba and Haiti, drawing up measures that will be urgently applied.

The Cuban Medical Mission is looking after 37 centres dealing with the epidemic where, until today, they have cared for 26,040 persons affected with cholera; to these they will immediately add, along with the Henry Reeve Brigade, 12 more medical centres (for a total of 49) with 1,100 new beds, in tents that were designed and made for those purposes in Norway and other countries, already purchased with earthquake funds, delivered to Cuba by Venezuela for the reconstruction of the Haitian health system.

Late today encouraging news arrived from Dr. Somarriba: during the past seven days there has not been one single death from cholera in the centres looked after by the Cuban Medical Mission. That figure would be impossible to keep up since other factors can come into play in that result, but the acquired experience, suitable methods and the degree of dedication achieved provides us with a very cheering idea.

We are also pleased that President René Preval, whose term in office ends next January 16th, has made the decision to transform the struggle against the epidemic into the most important activity of his life, one he will leave as a legacy to the people of Haiti and to the government that follows him.

Fidel Castro Ruz

November 27, 2010, 9:56 p.m.


Bacchus
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Joined: Dec 8 2003

Him before it was protesters violently protesting UN troops, now the news reports say they were only protesting the Nepalese UN troops which a leaked report now says was the source of the epidemic.

 

The populace differentiated between UN troops and Nepalese UN troops?? Spin anyone?


Caissa
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Joined: Jun 14 2006

The protests first erupted Tuesday, after the provisional electoral council said none of the candidates had won an outright majority in the first round of voting.

Mirlande Manigat, a professor and wife of a former president, claimed 31 per cent of the votes, followed by the government-backed candidate Jude Celestin, with 22 per cent, officials said.

Michel Martelly, a popular musician also known as Sweet Mickey, came in just behind Celestin with slightly more than 21 per cent.



Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/world/story/2010/12/08/haiti-election-protests.html#ixzz17XgsjIPK


NDPP
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Haiti: Obama Does Not Like Black People (and vid)

http://www.globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=va&aid=22594

"Yet rather than daydreaming about sudden goodwill towards Haiti by its historical tormentors, [Canada et al] this film sheds light on the existence of true transformative Haitian leadership in action. Perhaps Pina should also change the title of his film to 'Pease Make Haiti a UN Protectorate Governed by Bill (Tarzan) Clinton.."


klarence
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Quote:
during the past seven days there has not been one single death from cholera in the centres looked after by the Cuban Medical Mission

And not a single Haitian was stuck by lightning at the Cuban medical center. Castro is more powerful than God!

 


Maysie
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Joined: Apr 21 2005

klarence is gone.


PraetorianFour
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Joined: Nov 16 2009

first ban of 2011?

 

Regarding aid to haiti, during the onset of a disaster the problem with all these smaller aid companies and organizations is that they do not have any real practice or experience working together.

 

Look at the Red River flood out west.  Death toll wasn't as high but you still had massed displaced persons and other issues surrounding natural disasters. [Unless you know it was the sonic cannon]

If anyone was there they would have seen how messed up things were because the aid agencies couldn't make any decisions and just looked at each other.  When the military came in they weren't well received at first until leaders in the CF started making decisions and stuff started getting done.

In a lot of cases of natural disasters the military has an advantage because they are acustomed to making decisions (even if they turn out to be the wrong ones). The worst thing one CAN do in situations like this is not make some sort of decision.  They are acustomed to juggling the administrative requirements of 2000 workers.


Fidel
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Joined: Apr 29 2004

So why not just assign disaster relief to the military full-time instead of civilian agencies and with more civilian infrastructure in basket case US colonies like Haiti? Why do the military have to be involved? Is there anything wrong with that picture in general?


Fidel
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Joined: Apr 29 2004

Washington Takes Control of Haiti Elections and Reconstruction, Cancels January Run-off

Haiti Liberte wrote:
As the Jan. 12 anniversary of the earthquake arrives next week, Haitians everywhere are calling louder than ever for an end to foreign meddling. "Since 2004 [when the U.S., France, and Canada backed a coup, occupied Haiti, then turned over the mission to the UN], the new colonists have painted the face of us who are Haitian with the mud of humiliation," wrote Aristide in his traditional year-end long letter-poem to the Haitian people on Dec. 21. "Up until now, the minority which excluded the majority cannot admit that it made a big mistake by accepting to saw off the branch that it was sitting on."
Please credit Haiti Liberte.


PraetorianFour
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Fidel wrote:

So why not just assign disaster relief to the military full-time instead of civilian agencies and with more civilian infrastructure in basket case US colonies like Haiti?

The organization leadership and administration I am talking about is a by product of the military.  It's good in a pinch but also has drawbacks, including what you mentioned where the US is getting their hands intop Haiti's elections.   It's a trade off.  Rapid releif, protection and saved lives vs. the US (or whomever) getting their hands into the pie.

A starving hatian who is bleeding out and needs surgerydoesn't care about the US screwing around with the elections in a year, they want to stop bleeding.  A year later maybe when their power is restored and they have water they are not so hot on the idea of US politicans pissing around with their country.

Ergo it's important that in situations like this the military hands over control and wipes their hands as soon as possible.

Quote:

Why do the military have to be involved? Is there anything wrong with that picture in general?

Well, one issue I know you ladies and gentlemen hate is the topic of rioters and looters. I know people here tried to argue that there really wasn't any going on..

I'll tell you anyone who doesn't think looting rioting and violence is one of the first things that happens has never been in a natural disaster like this before.

Even during the ice storm in rual ottawa we had looters. People breaking into homes of evacuated (sometimes not) people looking for money jewerly electronics. People were stealing generators and all kinds of things.  In Ottawa Canada.   Argue the point of you will but it's my opinion that one of the first people that are targeted during situations like this are the relief and aid workers who land on the scene with food, water, building supplies and medical supplies (which are worth their weight in gold on the black market).

 

Once order is restored and the threat of rioters criminals warlords is reduced drastically and a system is in place to move large amounts of food water and supplies (like the military is trained to do) they need to get out as soon as possible.

 

 


Fidel
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Joined: Apr 29 2004

PraetorianFour wrote:
I'll tell you anyone who doesn't think looting rioting and violence is one of the first things that happens has never been in a natural disaster like this before.

Haiti: We must kill the BANDITS - The Premise (YouTube)

This ruse about law and order and private property rights for the rich bullshit has been used by US-backed military dictatorships and death squad governments around the world for a long time.

The US-backed military in Haiti have been running drugs to the mainland for a long time and are protected by the American CIA and US Military. They would also like very much to return Cuba to its former glory as a waypoint for running illicit drugs to the continent. Drug profits help pay for their dirty wars waged against tiny nations of desperately poor people and fill the pockets of corrupt stooges and right wing politicians alike.

 


PraetorianFour
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So you're saying that there wasn't riots, mass looting, criminal activity and the threat of bodily harm by armed locals to both other locals and relief workers after the earthquake hit?   It's all a ruse, law and order was never an issue?


Fidel
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Joined: Apr 29 2004

So, what do you think of summary executions of alleged looters and "bandits"? Would this be a good time for a little purging of political opponents and re-establishing a repressive right wing military rule? A bullet to the back of the head for "looting" no trial no arrest records nothing?

There is no justice in Haiti. There never was.

Their first and last democratically elected president was abducted by the CIA and ferreted away to another country in the middle of the night. In fact, they don't intend to restore democracy or law and order because those items were never on the Uncle Sam's agenda for Haiti throughout the last century when US armed forces and CIA intervened in Haiti dozens of times on behalf of brutal, right wing dictators running the country into the ground.


PraetorianFour
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You're answering questions with questions :)


Fidel
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Joined: Apr 29 2004

Likewise. Why is it taking so long for the US Military and CIA to impose their brand of democracy on such a tiny island nation? Thety've been interfering politically and militarily in Haiti since turn of the last century. None of PApa doc or baby doc or the dreaded tonton macoutes were able to create a democratic country there no matter how many Haitians they butchered.


PraetorianFour
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Actually I'm not Fidel. You asked

"So why not just assign disaster relief to the military full-time instead of civilian agencies and with more civilian infrastructure in basket case US colonies like Haiti?" and I did my best to answer.

You quoted my comment about looting, riots and violence being the first thing we see after a natural disaster in the context of the 2010 quake and you replied with a video containing footage that as far as I saw didn't have much to do with the 2010 quake, but included stuff filmed 20 years ago- completely unrelated to earthquakes.

 

I then tried to get back on track with what I was discussing in my first post and you ignored my questions and asked more of your own.

 

It's seems pretty common here. Answering questions with questions and people covering their ears repeating the same thing over and over again.  If you don't want to hear what I have to say please don't ask me questions then ignore my answer and use me as a soap box to stand on.


Militarization of Aid to Haiti.

In the initial days weeks and perhaps months of a natural disaster it's a good thing - the military is acustomed to moving large quantities of people supplines food water and casualties. Armed soldiers can provide (if utilized properly) security detering looting, robbing, murder of locals and the hijacking and harrassment of unarmed NGOs and their supplies- All of which are common place immediately after events such as this.  After an effective system is in place and the local military and police have a handle of the situation the foerign military should leave as soon as possible as to not get involved with the politicking. The end.

 

This thread seems more about politics and preaching however so this is my bus stop.


Fidel
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Joined: Apr 29 2004

PraetorianFour wrote:
You quoted my comment about looting, riots and violence being the first thing we see after a natural disaster in the context of the 2010 quake and you replied with a video containing footage that as far as I saw didn't have much to do with the 2010 quake, but included stuff filmed 20 years ago- completely unrelated to earthquakes.

Quakes and other disasters happen all the time around the world. And they don't require the US Military to right things. So why is Haiti - the "freest trading nation in the Caribbean" according to Washington - such a basket case now and before and still a year later after the event? Hunger and cholera and other preventable diseases are still rampant in the USA's model Caribbean island nation. Why? Of course, you will surely have all the answers. Looters and bandits you say? 98 ice storm in Ottawa Valley? No comparison. For one thing Canada is a first world country with some actual infrastructure and social programs. Have you ever been to Haiti or Dominican Republic next door? There is very little there and home to some of the poorest people in this hemisphere. They live in corrugated tin shantys and mud and grass huts. The buildings would not pass code in Canada as regulations existed  here 30 or even 50 years ago.

Disaster Accountability Project: One Year Report

Quote:
Report finds near "Factual-Blackout" in relief/aid organizations' regular, detailed reporting: aggregates, anecdotes, and appeals to emotion dominate

Donors are "giving in the dark" and, despite some partnerships, groups cannot coordinate using annual or quarterly reports

No excuse for cholera epidemic and deteriorating conditions on the ground

The Disaster Accountability Project today issued a report entitled "One Year Followup Report on the Transparency of Relief Organizations Responding to the 2010 Haiti Earthquake."

The report seeks to determine (1) Whether 196 organizations that solicited donations for Haiti disaster relief produced regular, factual reports on their activities; and, if so (2) How comprehensive, frequent, factual, and publicly accessible such reports were. (3) Determine how much money has been raised for Haiti relief, how much of that has been spent, and on what (i.e., healthcare, food, clean water, etc.).

The foreign aid agencies are the ones who have panicked, are hysterical and ineffectual in Haiti. Haitians despite suffering from a wide range of diseases and hunger and chronic homelessness are calm and cool by comparison.

Yes there has been looting and bandits marauding through disaster ridden Haiti a year after the quake. And many of them are white people just visiting the island. They need socialism in Haiti not bs capitalist country aid agencies with many of them on the take and fingers in the cookie jars.


NDPP
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Port-au-Prince Still Buried Under the Rubble of Competing NGOs

http://www.opednews.com/articles/Port-au-Prince-Still-Burie-by-Georgiann...

"Both Oxfam and the Disaster Accountability Project released reports this week that enhance already serious criticism of the relationships between the Government of Haiti and NGOs, and the ability of both to offer support to the Haitian people."


M. Spector
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Joined: Feb 19 2005

From the Canada-Haiti Action Network:

Quote:
Despite the global promise of 11 billion dollars in assistance from donor countries and over a billion more donated to relief organizations, Haitians struggle to find shelter, clean water and food in displacement camps, according to a report released today by the Lamp for Haiti Foundation and the Institute for Justice & Democracy in Haiti (IJDH). The report, titled One Year After the Earthquake - Haitians Still Living in State of Crisis, documents continuing desperation in Haiti's camps even after the cholera outbreak, and recommends a rights-based approach to recovery and reconstruction.

One year after the January 12, 2010 earthquake, one million Haitians still live in 1,000 internally displaced persons (IDP) camps scattered around Port au Prince. The sudden and profound impact from the cholera outbreak - over 3,000 deaths and 130,000 people infected - demonstrated the failure of relief and reconstruction efforts by donor countries, aid agencies and the Haitian government. While cholera has not yet fully spread to the camps, given the extremely unsanitary conditions and overcrowded camps, the results would be disastrous. An estimated 400,000 Haitians could be infected within a year.


Noah_Scape
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Humans are the only species that has itself as it's primary predator. Haiti, for instance.

  A major factor in the slow progress to rebuild in Haiti is the corruption. Heavy equipment to remove the rubble sits at the dock, but nothing moves without paying a bribe. "10s of 1000s of dollars is the basic price" said a CBC reporter.

  It would seem that having the US Army there would help get around the corruption, but it doesn't. Maybe they are part of the problem, and not part of the solution. The US Army Core of Engineers could surely get things done in a hurry if they were given orders to do so, but that would get in the way of milking the situation for private gain.

  The Haitian politicians are said to be the main problem. Elections were not fair, the people did not get to choose their leaders, so it is obvious that Haitian political leadership is corrupt. 

   The term "disaster capitalism" fits with the Haitian experience since the earthquake. Here is an article reviewing "the shock doctrine" as it applies to Haiti > http://tinyurl.com/45v3gbq

It rambles on a bit, but when it gets to Haiti there is a section worth the read:

"Bush, Clinton and Obama Unite to Raise Money for Haiti"

After the December 2004 tsunami struck East Asia, the Bush administration spearheaded a similar campaign, raised over $1 billion, and used it for corporate development, not people needs. Obama backs a similar scheme (Clinton-Bush Haiti Fund) in a show of contemptible indifference to human misery and chose two co-conspirators for his plan.

The Bush administration engineered the February 2004 coup ousting Aristide, established police state rule, and immiserated nine million Haitians. For his part, Clinton kept an iron grip throughout his presidency instead of supporting Aristide's political, economic and social reforms.

He's now UN Special Envoy to Haiti heading an Obama administration neoliberal scheme featuring tourism, textile sweatshops, sweeping privatizations and deregulation for greater cheap labor exploitation at the expense of providing essential needs. He orchestrated a plan to turn northern Haiti into a tourist playground and got Royal Caribbean Cruise Lines to invest $55 million for a pier in Labadee where the company operates a private resort and has contributed the largest amount of tourist revenue to the country since 1986.

More still is planned, including a new international airport in the north, an expanded free trade zone, a new one in Port-au-Prince, now delayed, various infrastructure projects, and an alliance with George Soros' Open Society Institute for a $50 million partnership with Haitian shipper Gregory Mevs to build a free-trade zone for clothing sweatshops.

In addition, the Clinton Global Initiative (CGI) has $258 million in commitments, including the Better Work Haiti and HOPE II projects, taking advantage of duty-free Haitian apparel exports to America to encourage greater sweatshop proliferation.

According to TransAfrica's founder Randall Robinson:

"That isn't the kind of investment that Haiti needs. It needs capital investment. It needs investment so that it can be self-sufficient. It needs investment so that it can feed itself." It also needs debt relief, not another $100 million the IMF just announced adding more to a $1.2 billion burden.

Above all, Haiti needs democratic governance freed from US control, military occupation, and the kind of oppression it's endured for centuries so its people can breathe free.

It doesn't need two past and a current US president allied with Haiti's elites, ignoring economic justice, exploiting Haitian labor, ignoring overwhelming human desperation, militarizing the country, crushing resistance if it arises, and implementing a disaster capitalism agenda at the expense of essential human needs, rights and freedoms.

- end quote -

And here is Naomi Klein's page with all her Haiti disaster capitalsim related articles > http://www.naomiklein.org/search/node/Haiti


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