babble-intro-img
babble is rabble.ca's discussion board but it's much more than that: it's an online community for folks who just won't shut up. It's a place to tell each other — and the world — what's up with our work and campaigns.

A Fight in Tunisia

85 replies [Last post]

Comments

mahmud
Offline
Joined: May 14 2008

Fidel wrote:

Tunisia Forms Unity Government Dominated by Ruling Party

Klingons are back. Will Tunisians insist that no means no?

 

Greetings from Tunisia. As I am writing the curfew is in effect -8pm through 5am. Some remnants of the ousted Western supported dictator Ben Ali are still attempting to terrorize the people, hence I can hear some exchange of fire. The good news is that 3 hour earlier the Transitional President  addressed Tunisians assuring them that their demands -democracy, pluralism, full civil and human rights and freedoms- will be guaranteed, that there is no going back after all that the people have accomplished and that the leaders of the militia that is terrorizing Tunisians have been apprehended. He also called on Tunisians to keep vigilant. There have been incidents where militia have been for instance driving ambulances with the Red Crescent insigna and shooting on people randomly....

Tunisians all agree that the Klingons days are counted. The only difference is that some argue that they must leave now but others prefer that they remain for the short time until free elections are held in order to manage sensitive files. The Transitional President and Pime Minister have already resigned -yesterday- as members of their Party: Rassemblement Constitutionnel Democratique. 

 

 

 


Noah_Scape
Offline
Joined: Oct 24 2007

The "Arab Elite" 's message to the rest of the world has been that "the Arab masses are content", but it is obvious that it isn't true.

 The Arab nation's masses, perhaps a majority, are fed up with Arab Elite rule.  The kids are hankerin' for change.

  A majority of citizens of the Islamic world are sick and tired of the calls to prayer, and there are a significant portion of average Arabs who are "wanna be atheists, but are afraid to say so". I saw this in a blog from the Saud Kingdom!! The Arab Elite pretends there are no gay Arabs either.

  The masses generally don't like Islamic law, Sharia law, religious government {which may be blasphemous towards Muhammad and the Koran, but it is true}. I wouldn't suggest that this means they want western style democracy, and probably not western capitalsim, but they do want their government to do more of  "the will of the people".

   In response to the uprising, the Arab Elites offer cheaper food prices, but I doubt that will be enough to placate the restless masses. Go Tunisia Go!

 

And Q-bong, I think the title is very clever [but I am easily pleased by any music referance].

 


al-Qa'bong
Offline
Joined: Feb 27 2003

Thanks, but I disagree with you about the "Arab masses" being finally ready for a change.  They've been ready for about 40 or so years.


Bec.De.Corbin
Offline
Joined: Mar 17 2010
Tunisia's Islamists eye place in politics

 

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20110120/ap_on_re_af/af_tunisia_islam_opening_the_door

 

Quote:

Members of Ennahdha, Renaissance in English, say fears of radicalism have no merit.

"The Western media is frightening people, saying that 'the Islamists are rising.' But we are not to be feared," said party spokesman, Hamadi Jebali.

"We are not the Taliban or al-Qaida or Ahmadinejad," he said, referring to the Iranian president. "We will submit to the vote of the people when the time comes."

 This good...

Having them involved in politics is the best way to keep them in the halls of government where they are seen by all who vote and out of the basments of mosques where all they can do is plot with those that agree with them.


NDPP
Online
Joined: Dec 28 2008

Tunisia's Revolution and the Islamists

http://leninology.blogspot.com/2011/01/tunisias-revolution-and-islamists...

"The current revolt is not hegemonised by parties of the left or by the Islamists. At its heart is the trade union leadership, whose outlook is social democratic. But, like it or not, An Nahda leaders have been returning to Tunisia to participate..'


NDPP
Online
Joined: Dec 28 2008

Tunisia: As the ruling class manoeuvres at the top, elements of dual power develop from below

http://www.marxist.com/tunisia-dual-power-develops.htm

 


NDPP
Online
Joined: Dec 28 2008

Press TV: Tunisia Revolution (Part 1 Vid)

http://www.youtube.com/presstvglobalnews#p/u/10/riUUlgaU2qQ


kropotkin1951
Offline
Joined: Jun 6 2002

Bec.De.Corbin wrote:

and out of the basments of mosques where all they can do is plot with those that agree with them.

Fuck off you Islamaphobe.  this statement is disgusting.


Bec.De.Corbin
Offline
Joined: Mar 17 2010

kropotkin1951 wrote:

Bec.De.Corbin wrote:

and out of the basments of mosques where all they can do is plot with those that agree with them.

Fuck off you Islamaphobe.  this statement is disgusting.

 

Oh bullshit, that's a fragment of a sentence you've decided to isolate to fit your agenda. There's nothing islamfobic about that sentence unless you want to make it that. 

 

If you got a beef with me personally PM me and take this BS off the message board.


kropotkin1951
Offline
Joined: Jun 6 2002

Quote:

Having them involved in politics is the best way to keep them in the halls of government where they are seen by all who vote and out of the basments of mosques where all they can do is plot with those that agree with them.

You obviously just don't get it.


Bec.De.Corbin
Offline
Joined: Mar 17 2010

kropotkin1951 wrote:

Quote:

Having them involved in politics is the best way to keep them in the halls of government where they are seen by all who vote and out of the basments of mosques where all they can do is plot with those that agree with them.

You obviously just don't get it.

You're the grammer police?Tongue outWink

 

Come on we're all grown up here. Pretty much everyone here can figure out from the article I posted whom I was talking about there in my comment (except obviously you).

You did read the article right? If everyone, Islamist included, gets to participate in the new political process in Tunisia then nobody needs to feel so isolated they resort to underground violence.

That's a good thing, right?

 


kropotkin1951
Offline
Joined: Jun 6 2002

It is not grammar it is the Us versus Them tone of your post. I am also pleased to know that you have the ability to channel what "pretty much everyone here can figure out."  I stand in awe of your unique gift.


Catchfire
Offline
Joined: Apr 16 2003

Quote:
Having them involved in politics is the best way to keep them in the halls of government where they are seen by all who vote and out of the basments of mosques where all they can do is plot with those that agree with them.

Hi BDM, the above post is indeed problematic for the reasons kropotkin mentioned. It also channels Islamophobic stereotypes (mosque basements as sites of radical fundamentalist terrorism, etc.). Please be more mindful in the future.

kropotkin, if you could be less cavalier in your extra-curricular policing, I'd be much obliged. I appreciate your pointing out this kind of language, but please be less antagonistic.


NDPP
Online
Joined: Dec 28 2008

Tunisia and US Smugness - by Sam Hamod

http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/article27316.htm

"The financial elite in America - same as dictators elsewhere. The parallels between Tunisia and America are not that far off, it's only a matter of degree and size - but we have our won dictators who are in charge and they are called the Democratic and Republican parties.."


NDPP
Online
Joined: Dec 28 2008

Ben Ali's Family Allowed in Canada

http://www.ottawasun.com/news/canada/2011/01/23/17004671.html

"The federal government has confirmed that members of ousted Tunisian President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali's family are in Canada, and that they have every right to be here. 'There are I gather, a couple members of his family who are already Canadian permanent residents, which gives them a legal right to be here,' Jason Kenney, minister of culture and immigration, said Sunday.

Kenney said that to his knowledge only members of the Ben Ali family who posess permanent residence status are in Canada. QMI Agency learned that Ben Ali's wife, brother, and two children, along with the children's governess, landed at the Montreal - Trudeau airport Friday.."


al-Qa'bong
Offline
Joined: Feb 27 2003

Jason Kenney supports an Arab?

This makes no sense, unless...

Quote:

You won't read this in the Western press. Tunisian demonstrators were chanting about the Bin Ali gang: "Departure, Departure, O Gang of Israel."


CMOT Dibbler
Offline
Joined: May 17 2003

The Angry Arab says that this is the first time an arab dictatorship has been overthrown by a popular uprising, but surely their was people power in evidence when Nasser overthrew the king of Egypt.  Was the army completely without popular support when it kicked out Farook?  


sanizadeh
Offline
Joined: Dec 3 2007

Bec.De.Corbin wrote:

 This good...

Having them involved in politics is the best way to keep them in the halls of government where they are seen by all who vote and out of the basments of mosques where all they can do is plot with those that agree with them.

Works as long as the free elections remain in place after you bring the Islamist parties into the government.

We Iranians made that mistake 32 years ago and still haven't managed to get them out of power.

Hope Tunisians have better luck.


sanizadeh
Offline
Joined: Dec 3 2007

CMOT Dibbler wrote:

The Angry Arab says that this is the first time an arab dictatorship has been overthrown by a popular uprising, but surely their was people power in evidence when Nasser overthrew the king of Egypt.  Was the army completely without popular support when it kicked out Farook?  

I think he meant a civilian uprising. Nasser/Najib overthrow of Farouk was a military coup.


kropotkin1951
Offline
Joined: Jun 6 2002

sanizadeh wrote:

Works as long as the free elections remain in place after you bring the Islamist parties into the government.

We Iranians made that mistake 32 years ago and still haven't managed to get them out of power.

Hope Tunisians have better luck.

[/quote

They have a chance if they refuse to accept a trojan horse from the West.  The Ayatollah was the darling of the West and was hailed as the saviour of the country.  The West sat on its hands and watched the fundamentalists murder all the commies and socialists that had participated in the uprising and then sent in the Ayatollah.  Their Plan B resulted in a continuation of the dictatorships only unlike the Shah the Ayatollah was no ones pawn. 

Quote:

12 Bahman: Thirty years ago today, Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini returned to Iran from exile. 140 international reporters accompanied him on the Air France flight from Paris. “The Mayflower,” one Israeli scholar called it. Earlier today, Iranians marked that day in history at Mehrabad International Airport with Tehran's Philharmonic Orchestra. Photos by TehranBureau.com

http://www.demotix.com/news/14579/fajr-ayatollahs-return


NDPP
Online
Joined: Dec 28 2008

Inspired by Tunisia, Egypt's Protests Appear Unprecedented

http://www.csmonitor.com/World/Backchannels/2011/0125/Inspired-by-Tunisi...

"Egypt's protests today appear to be the largest poltiical call for democratic reform and an end to the Mubarak regime for years.."


Fidel
Offline
Joined: Apr 29 2004

Antigovernment Protests Spread Across North Africa and Middle East

Apparently they just don't appreciate the "new" liberal capitalism.


NDPP
Online
Joined: Dec 28 2008

Washington Facing the Ire of the Tunisian People

http://www.voltairenet.org/article168224.html

"While western media are celebrating the 'Jasmine Revolution', Thierry Meyssan lays bare the US plan to curb the anger of the Tunisian people and salvage this inconspicuous CIA and NATO backwater base."


NDPP
Online
Joined: Dec 28 2008

Ben Ali on Interpol's Wanted List

http://www.presstv.ir/detail/162171.html

"The international police agency Interpol has issued global arrest warrants for Tunisia's ousted President Zine El Abidene Ben Ali and several of his family members. Tunisia's Justice Minister Lazhar Keroui Chebbi said that Ben Ali and his relatives are wanted on charges of illegally taking money out of the country and acquiring real estate and other assets abroad.."

Tunisian Police Clash with Protesters

http://www.presstv.ir/detail/162087.html

"Tunisian police have clashed with hundreds of protesters camping out in front of the office of the ousted dictator's right hand man. The protesters demanded that interim Prime Minister Mohammad Ghannounchi and other members of the former ruling party resign. A powerful worker's union has also called a general strike to force the interim government's resignation. Teachers and students have started an open ended strike to join the street protests.."


NDPP
Online
Joined: Dec 28 2008

Tunisia Issues Warrant For Fugitive in Canada

http://www.thestar.com/news/world/article/928211--tunisian-fugitives-in-...

"Trabelsi, a billionaire, is specifically charged with illegally acquiring property and other assets and illegally transferring funds. He's also charged with illegal arms trading. In the Ben Ali pond, Trabelsi is one of the biggest fish. Immigration Minister Jason Kenney hinted Wednesday that Trabelsi is a permanent resident and could not simply be removed through standard immigration procedures."

Clearly, this billionaire and his family are being harboured by Canada, and thus far anyway, Tunisian attempts to arrest them, are being evaded by Canada. Never mind the statements that the family is 'not welcome', made so obviously for public consumption. There is more going on here than meets the eye:

Why is Canada protecting the Ben Ali billionaire?

http://www2.canada.com/nanaimodailynews/news/story.html?id=4150752


NDPP
Online
Joined: Dec 28 2008

Residency of Tunisia's Leader's Relative Revoked

http://www.cbc.ca/politics/story/2011/01/27/tunisian-president-brother-i...

"CBC News has learned the federal government has revoked the Canadian residency held by the ousted Tunisian president's brother-in-law, Belhassen Trabelsi. Mouldi Sakri, Tunisia's ambassador to Canada, said he has asked Canadian authorities to freeze the assets of the members of the Bin Ali family and their allies. Trabelsi's presence in Montreal has outraged Tunisian Canadians because he is accused of stealing large amounts of money from their home country.."

Congrats to Collectif de Solidarite au Canada avec les luttes sociales en Tunisie and all who pushed hard. This took lots of pressure and Ottawa got LOTS of emails. Onwards and upwards..


Fidel
Offline
Joined: Apr 29 2004
Fidel
Offline
Joined: Apr 29 2004

Are We Witnessing the Start of a Global Revolution?
North Africa and the Global Political Awakening, Part 1


Noah_Scape
Offline
Joined: Oct 24 2007

First off, I have to say that the best news I heard was that some of the Police and/or Military in Egypt were reportedly taking off their uniforms and joining the protestors. Now you know you lost, Hosni.

 

Yes, Fidel, we might be witnessing the start of a revolution in North Africa and other Islamic nations.  Some of those nations that might rise up against Elite rule were listed in a BBC article: Egypt Yemen Algeria Libya Jordan Morocco.

This is unique in that the protestors are not aligned with a particular religious stripe, or any political party. In fact, the protestors are going out of their way to keep it like that.

Quotes:

It is not about religion:
"When a man sporting a long beard and a white robe began chanting an Islamist slogan, he was grabbed and shaken by another protester telling him to keep the slogans patriotic and not religious."

It is not about a particular political party:
"The uprising united the economically struggling and the prosperous, the secular and the religious. The country's most popular opposition group, the Islamist Muslim Brotherhood, did not advertise its presence and it was not immediately clear how much of a role it played in bringing people to the streets."

What brought the revolution on:

... tens of thousands of rich, poor and middle-class protesters united in rage against a regime seen as corrupt, abusive and neglectful of the nearly half of Egypt's 80 million people who live below the poverty line of $2 a day.

.... the fruits of growth in this formerly socialist economy have been funneled almost entirely to a politically connected elite, leaving average Egyptians surrounded by unattainable symbols of wealth such as luxury housing and high-priced electronics as they struggle to find jobs, pay daily bills and find affordable housing.


In fact, it all sounds a lot like the complaints of the lower and middle classes of western nations, doesn't it? As in, the Elites are getting all the breaks while the struggling masses are pushed harder and asked to do with less; those with connections are often getting a place at the head of the line; security and the rule of law are for the wealthy, and only the common people ever feel the sting of justice when they do wrong [The powerlessness of average people ; It seems the only reason we have courts and jails is to keep us little people in line.]

 

Links:
Which are the countries involved, and what is the likelihood of real change?
> http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-12204971


> http://www.alarabiya.net/articles/2011/01/28/135395.html

.

 


RevolutionPlease
Offline
Joined: Oct 15 2007

C'mon Canada.  Wake up!


Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.
Login or register to post comments