babble-intro-img
babble is rabble.ca's discussion board but it's much more than that: it's an online community for folks who just won't shut up. It's a place to tell each other — and the world — what's up with our work and campaigns.

Disability

73 replies [Last post]

Comments

Boom Boom
Offline
Joined: Dec 29 2004

Eventually we may see solar powered hearing aids in Canada - just a matter of ingenuity and time.


Caissa
Online
Joined: Jun 14 2006

I thought the lack of sunshine would be an impediment.


Boom Boom
Offline
Joined: Dec 29 2004

LaughingLaughing


Caissa
Online
Joined: Jun 14 2006

A young girl with autism and her mother received an apology from the Winners retail chain for barring the girl's service dog from its west Edmonton store last weekend.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmonton/story/2011/10/28/edmonton-winners...

Boom Boom
Offline
Joined: Dec 29 2004

No Disability Forum here yet. Frown

 

I got a new hearing aid Wednesday, more power and programming ability than the last one, but I lost so much hearing in my 'blocked sneeze' episode last summer it doesn't make any difference in my hearing ability.Frown


Caissa
Online
Joined: Jun 14 2006

Ottawa's transit service has launched an investigation after a YouTube video on the weekend appeared to show a city bus driver delivering an expletive-filled tirade against an autistic passenger.

The 55-second cellphone video attracted hundreds of views and many angry comments.

Shot on the No. 96 bus from downtown Ottawa to Kanata, the video shows a young man in shorts standing near the driver. Out of view, another man, apparently the driver, yells at the passenger.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa/story/2011/11/06/ott-oc-transpo-vid...

Northern Shoveler
Offline
Joined: Feb 17 2011

Caissa wrote:

Ottawa's transit service has launched an investigation after a YouTube video on the weekend appeared to show a city bus driver delivering an expletive-filled tirade against an autistic passenger.

The 55-second cellphone video attracted hundreds of views and many angry comments.

Shot on the No. 96 bus from downtown Ottawa to Kanata, the video shows a young man in shorts standing near the driver. Out of view, another man, apparently the driver, yells at the passenger.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa/story/2011/11/06/ott-oc-transpo-video.html

Bus drivers are all judged by the actions of their most frustrated drivers. Strange how it is only union jobs especially public sector ones that get this kind of treatment. 

Babble seems to like to highlight each and every media complaint about unionized workers and their inadequacies. 


Caissa
Online
Joined: Jun 14 2006

I'm much more interested in the difficulties individuals on the autism spectrum often face than the adequacies or inadequacies of a worker.

Quote:

The young autistic man who was apparently the target of an expletive-filled tirade from an Ottawa bus driver says he was reading from a script he had written when the driver lashed out at him.

Matthew Taronno, a 20-year-old who describes himself as "mildly autistic," said the script contained some "inappropriate language" and said he went to the front of the bus to apologize. The driver was in no mood to hear it, Taronno told CBC News on Sunday at Algonquin College, where he is studying script writing.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa/story/2011/11/07/ottawa-octranspo-d...


Catchfire
Offline
Joined: Apr 16 2003

Boom Boom wrote:
Any chance of a Disability Forum or sub-forum?

Why, yes there is, BB. Sorry I missed this in the Spring. Let's discuss the name and other issues here, and we'll get it up and running ASAP.


Freedom 55
Offline
Joined: Mar 14 2010

Northern Shoveler wrote:

Caissa wrote:

Ottawa's transit service has launched an investigation after a YouTube video on the weekend appeared to show a city bus driver delivering an expletive-filled tirade against an autistic passenger.

The 55-second cellphone video attracted hundreds of views and many angry comments.

Shot on the No. 96 bus from downtown Ottawa to Kanata, the video shows a young man in shorts standing near the driver. Out of view, another man, apparently the driver, yells at the passenger.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa/story/2011/11/06/ott-oc-transpo-video.html

Bus drivers are all judged by the actions of their most frustrated drivers. Strange how it is only union jobs especially public sector ones that get this kind of treatment. 

Babble seems to like to highlight each and every media complaint about unionized workers and their inadequacies. 

 

Fired bus driver speaks out

 

Quote:

The terms for that explosive episode, at 2 a.m. on Nov. 3, were really set two days before.

It was Halloween. He was driving the No. 12 in the east end. It was about 8 p.m. A passenger, about 13 years old, boarded the bus and asked him to alert him to the Montreal and Shefford roads stop, only about six stops ahead.

The driver said okay, but told him to watch the electronic call-out system, which alerts passengers to every stop. No said the kid, yammering on his cellphone, you tell me when we get there.

“He keeps asking me, every stop, ‘is this it? Is this it?’”

When they finally arrive, the driver tells him. The youth was met by a friend on the sidewalk. Before leaping off, he spat in the driver’s face, took off, nearly running over a mom with a stroller.

The driver stopped the bus, called his supervisor. There was a discussion about whether he should go to the hospital. He declined, but an unusual thing happened. As though all of the stresses in his life surged at this moment, he started to crack. He couldn’t believe how upset he was.

“Christ man, I even said (to the supervisor) I didn’t even cry when my mom died.” But the spit in the face seem to break a dam.

He took the rest of the night off. The next day, exhausted because he hadn’t slept, he said he called his supervisor and it was agreed he would take Tuesday night off as a sick day, one of only four he had taken all year.

Wednesday, he was back behind the wheel, on the No. 96.

 


Catchfire
Offline
Joined: Apr 16 2003

Moving to Disability Issues Forum. (Hooraay!)


Boom Boom
Offline
Joined: Dec 29 2004

My heartfelt thanks to Catchfire and anyone else involved in setting up the Disability Issues forum!


Catchfire
Offline
Joined: Apr 16 2003

Thanks for that follow-up story, F55. Very telling.


Northern Shoveler
Offline
Joined: Feb 17 2011

Can someone explain "mildly autistic" to me. I wonder what was in the script that this young man was reading? The story says he thought he should go and apologize for it.  

Thx F55

PTSD is rarely diagnosed but is a real and serious mental health issue that many front line workers experience especially in the public service sector. 


6079_Smith_W
Offline
Joined: Jun 10 2010

I think it is a disability issue from the perspective of the driver's sensitivity, but really, it could have been anyone talking loudly and not being aware of the effect it was having on others. 

Autism covers a wide spectrum. I have a family member who has a mild form, and is far more aware, level-headed and perceptive than a lot of people. 


MegB
Offline
Joined: Nov 28 2001

Some people with Asberger's Syndrome aren't really distinguishable from high-functioning autistics.  In fact, some people with Asberger's are advocating that it as a difference, not a disibility that needs a cure or some form of treatment.


CMOT Dibbler
Offline
Joined: May 17 2003
Isn't Asberger's Syndrome a form of autism?

Unionist
Offline
Joined: Dec 11 2005

It's Asperger, with a "p". It's usually called an "autism spectrum disorder", but whether it's a "form" of autism or not really depends on how people choose to define autism. If we understood what caused either one, we might be wiser.

 


Maysie
Offline
Joined: Apr 21 2005

CMOT Dibbler wrote:
Isn't Asberger's Syndrome a form of autism?

Yes.


Caissa
Online
Joined: Jun 14 2006

I believe the draft of the DSM-V is suggesting subsuming Asperger under ASD.


Unionist
Offline
Joined: Dec 11 2005

Caissa (who knows a lot more about these issues, I believe, than I do) is correct - and here is the rationale of the DSM-V working group for deleting Asperger as a separate entry and subsuming it under Autism/ASD.

 


Northern Shoveler
Offline
Joined: Feb 17 2011

Lets not forget that the DSM-II listed homosexuality as a mental disorder.  The Tommy quotes on homosexuality are from 1968 the same year as the DSM-II was published. 

Mental retardation is still one of the DSM-IV labels. I have been advised at various stages of my sons life to highlight various aspects of his essence depending on what funding sources were available. That includes calling him autistic since he displays some of the DSM's listed traits. My son is unique and has no Doctor's name attached to a "Syndrome" to describe his "condition."  I call it being Benjamin.  I prefer to highlight his abilities while planning for the areas where he needs care for the safety and security of his person. 

IMO Labelling people is fraught with difficulties and often causes more harm than good.


oldgoat
Offline
Joined: Jul 27 2001

My son is aspie, and earlier had been also diagnosed with non-verbal learning disability, which is sort of a different side of that same coin.

I understand your feelings around labelling NS, and to a large extent agree, but where we found the diagnosis to be helpful, is that we could compel certain services and accomodations from the school board.  From about grade four on David started to present with some rather unique challenges which many of his teachers found to be a bit baffling and counter intuitive.  High functiong ASD's are much better dealt with these days, but when my son was in grade school both we and the teachers were on a bit of a learning curve. There were some teachers who needed to be dragged to this curve.  Ms. oldgoat and I became fairly formidable advocates.

Even now in University he gets a few fairly important accommodations and supports as a matter of right, as someone registered with Accessability Services.

Years ago he joined the Students with Autism Social Association, and now is employed part time by the U of T to co-facilitate one of the groups, as well as putting together and presenting a modified orientation package for incoming students like himself. 

Actually, having learned about the condition and being fairly familiar with the tests, I'm pretty sure I'm aspie myself.  I should say that my son does not regard himself as disabled.  He recognizes a poor fit between himself and mainstream society, which he sees as mainstream society's loss.  I'm inclined to agree.

He's been does a bit of public speaking to schools, as well as to student teachers at OISE which has been pretty well recieved, and has presented papers at a couple of conferences.  He understands and experiences autism as a subculture.

 

 

 

 


Northern Shoveler
Offline
Joined: Feb 17 2011

oldgoat wrote:

My son is aspie, and earlier had been also diagnosed with non-verbal learning disability, which is sort of a different side of that same coin.

...

Actually, having learned about the condition and being fairly familiar with the tests, I'm pretty sure I'm aspie myself.  I should say that my son does not regard himself as disabled.  He recognizes a poor fit between himself and mainstream society, which he sees as mainstream society's loss.  I'm inclined to agree.

He's been does a bit of public speaking to schools, as well as to student teachers at OISE which has been pretty well recieved, and has presented papers at a couple of conferences.  He understands and experiences autism as a subculture.

Thank you for sharing.  Labels are used by school boards and other institutions as gateways to funding and the gateway is always very restrictive.

I look back at my school years and think that it likely that if I had gone to grade school in the 1990's instead of the 1950's I would have been given Ritalin instead of the top marks in all my classes.  

My son is non verbal and requires constant personal care but is a very intelligent vibrant young man.  He understands respect and responds to respect or the lack of it in very clear and uncertain terms.  No one who looks at my son and sees a "retard" every lasts long as a caregiver.  He drives them off so quick it is a wonder too behold.  But look him in the eye and talk to him like a real human being and he is a lot of fun to be around. The DSM-IV says he suffers from a disorder called mental retardation. He has no fucking disorder he is just a unique human being who is who he is. 


oldgoat
Offline
Joined: Jul 27 2001

You'll get no argument from me about the DSM.  Benjamin sounds like a great kid.


Fotheringay-Phipps
Offline
Joined: Aug 26 2008

One member of our Constituency Association is on the autism spectrum and draws an ODSP pension because of his condition. I ran into him at a coffee shop yesterday and had a long chat. At one point he said, "You'll have to tell me if I'm boring you. I'm not good at reading people." I wish some non-autistic people I know would develop similar social awareness.


Caissa
Online
Joined: Jun 14 2006

A Fredericton woman wants an apology from Statistics Canada for the way it treated her profoundly deaf parents after they asked for an interpreter's help with a survey.

Melissa Hinds said Statistics Canada chose her parents to participate in a survey about technology. The invitation came from a woman who knocked at her parents' door and used written notes to explain the survey.

Her parents agreed to participate but asked for the assistance of a sign language interpreter, Hinds said.

Two days later a note showed up in their mailbox, she said.

"The note basically just said there were no signing services available - like none at all," Hinds said.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/new-brunswick/story/2012/02/06/nb-statisti...

Caissa
Online
Joined: Jun 14 2006

The Supreme Court of Canada has ordered a new trial in a sexual assault case involving a mentally disabled witness, and has given her the right to testify in court.

The case from Ontario involves a then 19-year-old disabled woman who was allegedly assaulted by a man living with her mother.

The woman, whose identity is protected by a publication ban, was determined to have the mental capabilities of a child three to six years old.

That led the accused to challenge whether she was capable of giving credible testimony in court, and the trial judge excluded this evidence.

Friday's ruling, in a 6-3 decision, set aside the man's acquittal, and ordered a new trial.

It also ruled that people with mental disabilities no longer have to undergo a competency test in order to testify.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/story/2012/02/10/supreme-court-testimony-c...

oldgoat
Offline
Joined: Jul 27 2001

Quote: 

Chief Justice Beverley McLachlin wrote in the ruling that to set the bar too high for testimony from people with disabilities would permit violators to sexually abuse victims with impunity.

"Sexual assault is an evil. Too frequently, its victims are the vulnerable in our society — children and the mentally handicapped. Yet rules of evidence and criminal procedure, based on the norm of the average witness, may make it difficult for these victims to testify in courts of law," McLachlin wrote in the ruling, on behalf of the majority.

 

An excellent decision.


Boom Boom
Offline
Joined: Dec 29 2004

.


Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.
Login or register to post comments