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Call to Action: #OCCUPYWALLSTREET 4

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Slumberjack
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Joined: Aug 8 2005

Rebellion in the Air?

Quote:
...the enemy of the public is being given a face.  No longer is it just a bunch of unidentified and overly aggressive cops. Now it's clear that it is the mayors, and whoever it is in the background who is giving them their marching orders, who are instructing the cops to go in and bust heads.

Mayor Bloomberg -- a man reportedly worth $19.5 billion, up a staggering $1.5 billion over the last year while other Americans are becoming poorer -- is in fact the perfect symbol of what is wrong with today's America. Having this greedy "one percenter" issue the marching orders to the police in New York makes it absolutely clear what this repression is about.

With this wave of assaults, the Occupation Movement is being forced to shift gears -- to move out of the cramped spaces to which it has been confined and to become an uprising for economic justice, instead of just an occupation as an act of protest. Zuccotti has been reoccupied, but the movement is busting out of the police barricades that surround the square.

Perhaps a group of young musicians standing on a street corner at 66th and Broadway just off Lincoln Square in New York City, doing a "mic check" routine at 11 pm the evening after the police assault on Zuccotti Plaza, said it best with their sign, which read: "Nostalgia for the Student Protests of the Past Dies Here!"

The '60s are over. It's the '10s now and rebellion is in the air.

Over and apparently forgotten.  Didn't cities team with counterattacks against the police, and wasn't fire put to terrible use, just about everywhere it seemed in those days?  Nowadays you'd have to travel to certain European destinations to get a whiff of that.  He must have written it from there.


M. Spector
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Joined: Feb 19 2005

Do as I say, not as I do

Quote:
There has been no shortage of crocodile tears from the U.S. political establishment about the violence against protesters in Syria and Iran. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and President Barack Obama have taken turns condemning the brutal suppression of movements for social justice in those countries....

Meanwhile, the absolute silence from the White House regarding the growing repression against peaceful demonstrators in this country speaks volumes....

We can't let the political representatives of the 1 percent denounce harsh measures against civilians if it suits them, while they condone the same repression if the protests are directed against them.


rbil
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Joined: May 12 2001

M. Spector wrote:

Do as I say, not as I do

Quote:
There has been no shortage of crocodile tears from the U.S. political establishment about the violence against protesters in Syria and Iran. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and President Barack Obama have taken turns condemning the brutal suppression of movements for social justice in those countries....

Meanwhile, the absolute silence from the White House regarding the growing repression against peaceful demonstrators in this country speaks volumes....

We can't let the political representatives of the 1 percent denounce harsh measures against civilians if it suits them, while they condone the same repression if the protests are directed against them.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zjfhOPCPJnE&feature=youtu.be


NDPP
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Joined: Dec 28 2008

A Few 'Pre-Revolutionary' Thoughts I Had  - by Arundhati Roy (and vid)

http://www.opednews.com/articles/a-few-pre-revolutionary--by-Arundhati-R...

"What you have achieved since September 17 when the Occupy movement began in the United States, is to introduce a new imagination, a new political language into the heart of empire. You have re-introduced the right to dream into a system that tried to turn everybody into Zombies, mesmerized into equating mindless consumerism with happiness and fulfillment.

As a writer, let me tell you, this is an immense achievement. And I cannot thank you enough..."


epaulo13
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Joined: Dec 13 2009
Self-sufficient Wall Street: the beginning of chapter two

Quote:

The importance of self-sufficiency and sustainability were incorporated into the Occupy movement’s grassroots democratic system from the beginning, as one of the movement’s working groups. Practical, sustainable solutions — many of which fine-tuned by the permaculture movement — were implemented almost immediately, and quickly snowballed into developed systems....

http://roarmag.org/2011/11/self-sufficient-wall-street-the-beginning-of-...


M. Spector
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Joined: Feb 19 2005

Quote:
Behind the police, directly or indirectly, stands that bureaucratic monster of post-9/11 domestic "safety," the Department of Homeland Security.  And behind both of them, without a doubt, that giant tangle of agencies -- 17 in all -- with an $80 billion-plus budget that go under the rubric of “intelligence” and dwarf the intelligence bureaucracy of the Cold War era, when the U.S. actually had an enemy worth speaking of.

All of this is the spawn of the 9/11 moment, which is why, on November 15th when the NYPD entered the encampment at Zuccotti Park, a weaponless and peaceable spot filled with sleeping activists and the homeless, they used pepper spray, ripped and tore down everything, and tossed all 4,000 books from the OWS “library” into a dumpster, damaging or mangling most of them.  Books couldn’t escape the state’s violence, nor could the library’s tent, bookshelves, chairs, computers, periodicals, and archives.  Even librarians were arrested

Much was literally trashed and, though “books are pretty sturdy objects,” as one Zuccotti Park librarian wrote me, “when you throw them into a dumpster a lot of them get destroyed. We have recovered about one third of our books and of that number many are far too damaged to re-circulate.”  Novelist Salman Rushdie tweeted a perfectly reasonable response to the police action: “Please explain the difference between burning books and throwing thousands in the trash and destroying them.”

Stop for a moment and imagine what the headlines here would have been like if Iranian or Chinese police had broken into a peaceful oppositional encampment and literally trashed its library without a second thought.  The barbarians!  Imagine what a field day the pundits would have had.  Imagine what Fox News would have said.

Nothing, of course, had to be this way.  That it was makes it part of the official legacy of 9/11 and Osama bin Laden.  In the wake of that day, this is what Washington did to itself, and so to us.  In the process, it did one other thing: it put the Constitution in the dumpster.

Tom Engelhardt


Fidel
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Joined: Apr 29 2004

Michael Hudson wrote:
Fifty years ago an old socialist told me that revolutions happen when people just get tired of being afraid. In today's case the revolution may grow nearer when people get over being depressed and stop blaming themselves. They come to think that we are all in this together - and if this is the case, there must be something wrong with the way the economy is organized.


epaulo13
Online
Joined: Dec 13 2009
..a very well done video.
Anonymous - Message to Occupy the World 11-18-11

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VqWdyM91hFA


epaulo13
Online
Joined: Dec 13 2009
Occupy Homes lauds a radical new phase for the movement

The drive to stop foreclosures and squat bank property marks a radical shift from the occupation of public space to the public repossession of private property.

The Occupy movement is ratcheting up the resistance. Inspired by the Spanish indignados, this Tuesday activists all over the United States will be taking the struggle indoors: to the homes of poor families who are under threat of being evicted by large and powerful Wall Street banks. The move from occupying public space to reclaiming private property marks a radical escalation of civil disobedience, striking the capitalist system right at its institutional heart....

http://roarmag.org/2011/12/occupy-our-homes-banks-homes-foreclosures/


Boom Boom
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Joined: Dec 29 2004
Proceeds from 'Occupy This Album' will benefit movement

 

 

Occupy Wall Street now has an A-list soundtrack: the compilation Occupy This Album, which was announced today and will be released sometime this spring. The record will feature music from Debbie Harry, Jackson Browne, Yoko Ono, Third Eye Blind, Crosby and Nash and many more. Several of the contributors, including Joan Baez and Crosby and Nash, performed at the New York OWS site while it was still active.

 

 

 


epaulo13
Online
Joined: Dec 13 2009

On Founders and Keepers of Occupy Wall Street

Last week, a power struggle within an Occupy collective emerged into the public realm when one member took sole ownership of the @OccupyWallSt twitter handle and began to issue calls to action and reflections on the history of the movement.

The act generated quite a bit of controversy among Occupy activists who feel, as I do, a strong visceral connection to a movement which has at every juncture defied formal leadership or hierarchy. Media outlets like Buzzfeed proclaimed last week’s outburst of public infighting to be the “final implosion” of Occupy, while bloggers debated its causes and implications: lack of consensus, over-reliance on consensus, consolidation of Occupy media properties, and more.

As the controversy ricochets across our still-vibrant networks, I write here to offer my own perspective on what immediate lessons can be learned from the debacle.....

http://www.occupy.com/article/founders-and-keepers-occupy-wall-street


NDPP
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Joined: Dec 28 2008

2014 Worldwide Wave of Action For Truth, Justice, Freedom (and vid)

http://www.washingtonsblog.com/2014/02/mlks-spirit-rises-2014-worldwide-...

Stop US Oligarchic 1% Crimes

 


epaulo13
Online
Joined: Dec 13 2009

Undoing the Politics of Powerlessness

quote:

We need to replace judgment and self-righteousness with curiosity and compassion. Those are the tools that will help us support each other in the face of the crises ahead, and they are the qualities we will need in order to truly understand the very many people we still need to organize. They will help us become facilitators instead of polemicists, teach us to build instead of tear apart. Flexing these new muscles, we must convert a politic that punishes imperfection into one that uses everything at its fingertips to win — that compels each and every one of us to turn our gifts into weapons for the sake of freedom. We need to build groups — collectives, organizations, affinity groups, whatever — because groups are what keep us in the movement, they’re what keep movement moments going, where we transform, how we fight, and the best way to hold each other accountable to the long struggle for liberation. We need to win small victories that open up space for bigger ones, and we must celebrate them, because that’s the best inoculation against a politic based in fear that nothing is winnable. We have to develop powerful visions for the world we want, so we can put those small victories inside a broader strategy that strikes at the roots of the systems we face. We must all engage in the hard and transformational work to become our most powerful selves; after all, it is truly the only way we even stand a chance.


Unionist
Online
Joined: Dec 11 2005

Great excerpt, epaulo, but wow, there's way more in that long article that needs to be absorbed and digested and re-read. I'm thinking it needs its own thread.

Like this:

Quote:

The Politics of Powerlessness

Many of us left that moment bitter, depressed, heart-broken. Some of that is predictable, maybe, on the downward spiral from such a high. Some of it was the product of a lot of young folks experiencing their first tastes of movement and thinking the result was going to be a revolution. But some of it was specific to this toxicity, the sudden snapping of this unbelievable tight rope we had been racing across.

From there, I went wandering. I bumped straight into the movement’s social media call-out culture, where people demonstrate how radical they are by destroying one another. It felt like walking into a high school locker room. In this universe, we insist on perfect politics and perfect language, to the exclusion of experimentation, learning, or constructive critique. We wear our outsiderness as a badge of pride, knowing that saying the right thing trumps doing anything at all. No one is ever good enough for us — not progressive celebrities who don’t get the whole picture, not your Facebook friend who doesn’t quite get why we say Black Lives Matter instead of All Lives Matter, not your cousin who mourned the deaths in Paris without saying an equal number of words about those in Beirut. Instead of organizing these people, we attack them. We tear down rather than teach each other, and pick apart instead of building on top of what we have.

And this (which I'm still thinking about...):

Quote:
For example, the mantra of leaderlessness came from a genuine desire to avoid classic pitfalls into hierarchy, but it was, at the same time, a farce, and divorced from any sense of collective structure or care for group culture. It foreclosed on the possibility of holding emerging leaders accountable, created a situation in which real leaders (whether worthy or not) went to the shadows instead of the square, and made it impossible to really develop one another (how, really, could we train new leaders if there weren’t supposed to be any in the first place?). Similarly, the refusal to articulate demands was brilliant in opening radical possibilities and sparking the popular imagination, but it also meant we didn’t have a shared goal, meant the word winning wasn’t even part of the movement’s lexicon. In many ways, it was an expression of a fear of actually saying something and taking responsibility for it, and it encouraged the often-repeated delusion that we didn’t even want anything our enemy had to give, that Wall Street and the State didn’t have any power over us. The vigilance against co-option came from honest history of movements falling prey to powerful forces hoping to dull or divert their aims; but it ultimately became a paranoia more than anything else, a tragic misunderstanding of the playing field and what it was going to take to build popular power. Instead of welcoming other progressive forces and actually co-opting them, purists shamed “liberals,” cultivated a radical macho culture more focused on big speeches at assemblies and arrests in the streets than the hard organizing behind the scenes, and turned Occupy into a fringe identity that only a few people could really claim to the exclusion of the hundreds of thousands who actually made it real.

Wow.


wage zombie
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Joined: Dec 8 2004

Yeah this is a great article.  I found myself agreeing with much of it and I had many of the same feeling about Occupy Vancouver.


epaulo13
Online
Joined: Dec 13 2009

..yes i had a lot to choose from as an excerpt. it's a long peiece and i haven't even finished reading it. but worth a thread yes. it's a look back as well as forward.


wage zombie
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Joined: Dec 8 2004

Strangely though--I read this article a few weeks ago, and there were more comments (some negative).  They don't appear to be there anymore.


epaulo13
Online
Joined: Dec 13 2009

..my position for a long time has been that leadership changes from one situation to the next. and it is natural human behaviour.

..i entered the occupy in vancouver as a supporter. it was young people who had made this possible i want to see what they can do. most of my adult life i have a passion for grassroots democracy and it's many forms. so i go to observe how decisions are made. one focus is the assembly.

..leadership went to great lengths to ensure that when talking to each other that the power dynamic was balanced. many had various experiences but this was done on the fly right then and there. in decision making the assembly ran into problems related to efficency. as some first nations were a part of the occupy they began to teach us how to make decisons in a better way and it would included everyone that wanted to participate. that is when the city forced the occupy off art gallery property. so the organizing leadership went on goes on as it did in spain and greece but decision making is where the heart of this lies because decisions made elsewhere are not made in our interests. so were learning. examples galore among the resistance here on turtle island. 

eta:

..in spite of the struggles in leadership, that wage zombie can describe better than me, the occupy accomplished much. the link is now dead but this is what i posted way back then.

Top 10 Achievements of Occupy Vancouver

quote:

2. We built a city-within-a-city, establishing and sustaining a complex street-level occupation in an urban core that involved thousands of people over 37 days.

This city, while no more free of problems and suffering than the larger city surrounding it, nevertheless placed the free exchange of food and medical services, as well as the free exchange of ideas, at its centre. On this basis I call the city we built a utopian city. It is an idea whose time has come.

3. We provided 37,000 free meals (Food Not Bombs!), housing and community for some 30 homeless people, and operated the only 24 hour free medical clinic in the city.

 


epaulo13
Online
Joined: Dec 13 2009

..excellent oportunity to share this more recent and excellent documentary on another occupation. about 20 min long.

Gazi to Gezi - a stones throw away

Gazi to Gezi - a stone's throw away" explores the poetry of a nationwide revolt in Istanbul, Europe's largest city. An explosive mix of the city’s inhabitants come together to fight the police and barricade themselves into one of the metropolis' few remaining green spaces, Gezi Park. All are present; from the liberal students, to oppressed, illegal revolutionary groups living among the slums of the city. The film, told through the memory of a stone, attempts to link the past with the present in a cinematic format which is neither factual nor fictitious. Scored to a beautiful soundtrack, the audience is taken into a rebellious world.


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