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It's time to afford non-citizens some voting rights in Canada

71 replies [Last post]

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Fidel
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Joined: Apr 29 2004

I hear you loud and clear. I just think that the old three-pronged trident punch attack as per WWII era fascists might work against ... the fascists! I think proles should focus our efforts, pick their weak spots, and go hard. No prisoners. You have to admit it at least sounds like a plan.


Erik Redburn
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Joined: Feb 26 2004

Slumberjack wrote:

Erik Redburn wrote:
 You think thats clever?   Since this is the nth time I've seen you made anti-democratic remarks here, I'll just remind you that the authority to draft and enforce our laws, make or avoid war, and collect and redistribute taxes still lie within Parliament and it's one of the few remaining public processes that still has at least some legitimacy anymore.  

The authority to make war actually resides in the PMO's office.  The last few votes on the matter were take note sessions.  Try not to get all bent out of shape explaining our 'democracy' and our 'laws.'

 

hhmm.   The constitutional right to actually vote out bad politicians and their parties shouldn't be confused with the corruption of the present political process.   Otherwise we end up throwing the baby out with the bath water.

My earlier point to you was rather simpler though, whether we approve or not, our elected authorities have the authority to pass laws and decide how they are enforced, which affect us all.  Dropping out is not an option.


Cribs
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Joined: Dec 19 2011

I think that to be able to vote you should be a citizen of the Country you are attempting to vote in. Imagine this, people brought over by a company to work here (from another country) and said people are not citizens but are able to vote they can change the results and send an MP who kissed up to the corporation with vested interests to Ottawa. If this MP is part of the governing party thats even worse because then they have even more pull and could possibly chage things to support the corporation that bought their seat and NOT their constituents. 


Cribs
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Joined: Dec 19 2011

I think that to be able to vote you should be a citizen of the Country you are attempting to vote in. Imagine this, people brought over by a company to work here (from another country) and said people are not citizens but are able to vote they can change the results and send an MP who kissed up to the corporation with vested interests to Ottawa. If this MP is part of the governing party thats even worse because then they have even more pull and could possibly chage things to support the corporation that bought their seat and NOT their constituents. 


autoworker
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Joined: Dec 21 2008

I think the question is actually about nationalism, and what it means to be a citizen.


Fidel
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Joined: Apr 29 2004

Cribs wrote:

I think that to be able to vote you should be a citizen of the Country you are attempting to vote in. Imagine this, people brought over by a company to work here (from another country) and said people are not citizens but are able to vote they can change the results and send an MP who kissed up to the corporation with vested interests to Ottawa. If this MP is part of the governing party thats even worse because then they have even more pull and could possibly chage things to support the corporation that bought their seat and NOT their constituents. 

 

Never happen. It would be comprable to the former South African apartheid government's feeble attempt to grant voting rights for black South Africans in the 1950s. I suspect our own anti-democratic forces would place a two-thirds majority threshold House vote as a barrier between change and their grip on power.


Erik Redburn
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Joined: Feb 26 2004

Cribs wrote:

I think that to be able to vote you should be a citizen of the Country you are attempting to vote in. Imagine this, people brought over by a company to work here (from another country) and said people are not citizens but are able to vote they can change the results and send an MP who kissed up to the corporation with vested interests to Ottawa. If this MP is part of the governing party thats even worse because then they have even more pull and could possibly chage things to support the corporation that bought their seat and NOT their constituents. 

 

That's my concern too.


3130sputter
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Joined: Dec 21 2011

the charter is for citizens only, the right to for is a privilege afforded to citizens only and rightly so. if a premanent resident wants to vote then become a citizen and add their voice to this country.


Unionist
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Joined: Dec 11 2005

Sewer's backin' up again...

 


Sineed
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Joined: Dec 4 2005

Erik Redburn wrote:

Cribs wrote:

I think that to be able to vote you should be a citizen of the Country you are attempting to vote in. Imagine this, people brought over by a company to work here (from another country) and said people are not citizens but are able to vote they can change the results and send an MP who kissed up to the corporation with vested interests to Ottawa. If this MP is part of the governing party thats even worse because then they have even more pull and could possibly chage things to support the corporation that bought their seat and NOT their constituents. 

 

That's my concern too.

Me too. And bagkitty has the same concern, expressed in earlier posts.

Citizenship is relatively easy to acquire in Canada, with a short residency requirement. The OP is a knowlegeable and thoughtful guy, but in most cases I would be concerned that if folks didn't live here for at least 3 years, they wouldn't have the background to make an informed choice.

Just to review:

Quote:
To qualify for citizenship an immigrant must: be a permanent resident of Canada and have lived in Canada for at least three of the four years preceding his or her application; be able to communicate in English and/or French; and be able to demonstrate basic knowledge of Canadian history, geography, law and political institutions. Applicants must also swear an oath of allegiance, pay a fee of $200 and not be deemed a threat to national security or have a record of certain criminal offences.

This is a pretty low bar. Granted, it's more than those of us who were born here have to do, but it's less than many countries demand. And many immigrants have the added advantage of having another country to go to if things don't work out here. My father is a citizen in the country of his birth as well as Canada, with all the benefits of two countries to call home; he can travel there without hassle, work, or buy property if he likes.

And if somebody with more than 3 years' residency can't be bothered applying for citizenship, are they going to be bothered to vote? According to Wiki, countries that enfranchise non-citizens see a low voter turnout in that group.


Erik Redburn
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Joined: Feb 26 2004

Sineed wrote:

And if somebody with more than 3 years' residency can't be bothered applying for citizenship, are they going to be bothered to vote? According to Wiki, countries that enfranchise non-citizens see a low voter turnout in that group.

 

Hm, that little bit of info makes me breathe a little bit easier; still makes me nervous though.


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