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Internet Censorship set to become U.S. Law

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M. Spector
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Joined: Feb 19 2005

6079_Smith_W wrote:

You and I  are talking about it right now. What do you call that?

I'm not monitoring anything. Are you?

Quote:
If you think they should be shut down then why are you posting?

If I thought they'd shut down if I refused to post, then I wouldn't be posting. Don't blame me if they can't get with the program. When the US is censoring the internet, Rabble will feel it just as much as anyone else.

Quote:
And I will repeat my main point - who would be most affected, and in what way would it change anyone's mind?

Yeah, protests are dumb. Nobody ever notices and they don't affect how people feel about things. We should just carry on business as usual, regardless, and save our shock and surprise for when we wake up one day to find the internet is being regulated by the NSA.

Quote:
Sorry, I have no use for jumping on a bandwagon just for the sake of jumping on a bandwagon.

Apology accepted. The bandwagon left without you a long time ago anyway.

 


6079_Smith_W
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Joined: Jun 10 2010

That wasn't an apology, M. Spector (for what?), but rather a statement of regret. 

The thing about political aciton is it doesn't really work if all you do is chide others for something you aren't willing to take a stand on yourself. You see something not being done? Put up or don' t put up.

If I saw something going on I felt was wrong, or needed action, I would make a statement and act myself, without waiting for someone else to lead the way.

I see no such need with respect to this site. I'll keep posting, because of the distinction about the effective use of protest, and the importance of media  I made in my past post. Perhaps you should go read it again.

(edit)

FYI, these sites are up and running, even though I think they are aware of the protest:

http://americancensorship.org/

http://fightforthefuture.org/

https://www.eff.org/

 

 


radiorahim
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Joined: Jun 17 2002

The Free Software Foundation, the activist organization that promotes software freedom everywhere has posted it's "black out" statement here

What I like about them in particular is that they challenge the phoney corporate propaganda term "intellectual property".

(In case it's down by the time you see this post)

Quote:

Dear Free Software Supporter,

Today, for 24 hours, all of the FSF websites, including fsf.org, gnu.org, defectivebydesign.org, shop.fsf.org, directory.fsf.org, libreplanet.org, savannah.gnu.org, windows7sins.org and playogg.org have gone dark to raise awareness of two bills in congress – H.R.3261 "Stop Online Piracy Act" and S.968 "PROTECT IP" (use of a propaganda term like "Intellectual Property" tells us that this will be bad) – which could radically change the landscape of the Internet. These bills provide draconian mechanisms for enforcement of copyright which would restrict the essential freedoms the Free Software Foundation fights for, putting the very tools and sites used to publish and develop free software into jeopardy, as well as threatening the existence of websites with user-submitted information, including Wikipedia, reddit, web forums, and the mailing list service we provide to tens of thousands of free software developers.

Please take today as a day of focus and action to learn about these destructive bills and do what you can to prevent them from becoming reality.


jas
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Joined: Jun 6 2005

Intellectual property is corporate propaganda ? Or did you mean that their use of the term is inaccurate?

 

Did Google protest today? This article says it did, but I never noticed it.

 


radiorahim
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Joined: Jun 17 2002

jas wrote:

Intellectual property is corporate propaganda ? Or did you mean that their use of the term is inaccurate?

Did Google protest today? This article says it did, but I never noticed it.

Yes the term "intellectual property" is a corporate propaganda term.   What it does is lump together copyright, trademark and patent law into one ball of wax as if they are all "the same"...and...they are not.  Then the corporations try to tell us that the "owners" of this so-called intellectual property have the same rights as owners of physical property.    The next step for the corporations is to lobby/buy politicians so that they introduce laws like SOPA and PIPA and similar initiatives in Canada.

Copyright covers a work such as a written work, music, artistic work etc.   If you create a work, you own the copyright to it and can decide how your work can be used.  You don't have to go to a government office to apply for copyright.

Trademarks were introduced so that if someone bought an item, they'd know that the item was "the real thing".

Patents cover inventions, and provide a limited monopoly over the use of a particular invention.   But, you have to go to a government office to apply for a patent.   The idea around patents is to encourage people to invent things by giving them this limited monopoly.

My explanation is brief, but you get the idea.   None of these three things has anything to do with the other.   So IMHO, we should always reject the use of the term "intellectual property" as a corporate propaganda term.

There's a more detailed explanation here

As for Google, the reason why you wouldn't have seen the small protest statement is that it was only posted on Google.com and not on Google.ca 

When Google sees where your web browser is coming from (yes they and most sites can see that) they automatically point you at your country-specific site.

 

 


Catchfire
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Joined: Apr 16 2003

Senator Dodd On Irresponsible Developments of "Blackout Day"

Quote:
Only days after the White House and chief sponsors of the legislation responded to the major concern expressed by opponents and then called for all parties to work cooperatively together, some technology business interests are resorting to stunts that punish their users or turn them into their corporate pawns, rather than coming to the table to find solutions to a problem that all now seem to agree is very real and damaging.

 

It is an irresponsible response and a disservice to people who rely on them for information and use their services. It is also an abuse of power given the freedoms these companies enjoy in the marketplace today. It’s a dangerous and troubling development when the platforms that serve as gateways to information intentionally skew the facts to incite their users in order to further their corporate interests.

 

A so-called “blackout” is yet another gimmick, albeit a dangerous one, designed to punish elected and administration officials who are working diligently to protect American jobs from foreign criminals. It is our hope that the White House and the Congress will call on those who intend to stage this “blackout” to stop the hyperbole and PR stunts and engage in meaningful efforts to combat piracy.

Emphasis added. Thanks Mr. Dodd!


6079_Smith_W
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Joined: Jun 10 2010

I guess he includes elected and administration officials who use copyright legislation to try and take down their own laws when people publish them on the internet, and elected officlals and corporate backers of the bills who are no strangers to piracy themselves.

I suppose the next move is some kind of "essential services" law  to protect our freedom.

And "corporate interests"? Has he ever visited Wikipedia? If so I am sure he has noticed their fundraising campaign, and the fact they are a non-profit foundation.


6079_Smith_W
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Joined: Jun 10 2010
Bacchus
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Joined: Dec 8 2003

stevebrown
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Joined: Dec 19 2011

And that's without SOPA. The internet is going to have to develop another domain name that can compete with .com or else the U.S. will always be able to do this.


6079_Smith_W
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Joined: Jun 10 2010

Indeed, so it starts. 

Too bad the aggressors are going into the field with horses and muzzleloaders..

 

Anonymous takes down DOJ, MPAA, RIAA, Universal Music

http://www.neowin.net/news/anonymous-takes-down-doj-website-in-response-...


Bacchus
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Joined: Dec 8 2003

stevebrown wrote:

And that's without SOPA. The internet is going to have to develop another domain name that can compete with .com or else the U.S. will always be able to do this.

 

Wouldnt matter. US dominated agencies oversee all the domain extensions not to mention most of the hubs.  Its interesting though that there seems to be no determined hunt for anonymous members.


stevebrown
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Joined: Dec 19 2011

Anonymous is getting busy tonight.

 


radiorahim
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Joined: Jun 17 2002

From the Neowin.net link above

Quote:

"Update 9: Twitter has manually removed the #opmegaupload and #oppayback hashtags from trends and appears to be actively ripping out anything related."

This is why we can't place our trust in corporate controlled social networks like Twitter and Facebook.


mmphosis
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Joined: Apr 28 2009
Fidel
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Joined: Apr 29 2004

The Swedish Pirate Party strongly condemns raid against MegaUpload

Quote:
*Like that's a big surprise.

*The biggest denial-of-service attacks in Internet history are going on right now. They're almost all aimed against American law enforcement sites and American film and music entities. I don't believe that MegaUpload had "150 million users," but MegaUpload was among the 100 largest sites on the World Wide Web. MegaUpload was very intimate and familiar to hordes of infringers, and even a few legitimate users, who relied on it every day.

*Some Rubicon has been crossed here; everybody involved has entrenched position and wants to be loud and aggressive about it. This is gonna get lively. I don't have the time and resources to follow a story this huge, but I can throw in a few sidelights. Like these Swedish guys gloating about their future electoral prospects, for instance.

http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2012/01/megaupload-indicted-shuttered

The Swedish Pirate Party strongly condemns raid against MegaUpload


Bec.De.Corbin
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Joined: Mar 17 2010

Here is the response from my Congressman:

Thank you for con tacting me regarding H.R. 3261, the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) . I appreciate your taking the time to share your thoughts with me. I value the input of every citizen in making sound decisions for Kansas and for America. I do not support SOPA in its current form.


H.R. 3261 would authorize the U.S. Attorney General or an intellectual property rights owner harmed by an " internet site ded icated to infringing activities" ( " ISDIA " ) to commence an action against: (1) a registrant of an ISDIA ' s domain name, or (2) an owner or operator of an ISDIA accessed through a domain name. It would also allow the Attorney General to commence actions against such individuals associated with foreign domain names. Upon introduction, the bill was referred to the House Committee on the Judiciary.



While SOPA is designed to protect the intellectual property of innovators and entrepreneurs on the internet, I am very concerned about restricting free speech or harming the open and innov ative nature of the internet. House Congressional Hearings have been postponed , and no vote is schedule d for the bill. Opponents of SOPA are currently working on an alternative bill to address the many concerns. I will be sure to monitor the progress of SOPA and any alternative bills that may be introduced.

Looks like it worked... The bill is knocked down for now.


6079_Smith_W
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Joined: Jun 10 2010

THey may have put it off in the states. Looks like there is a secret lobby to have SOPA provisions included in Canada's copyright legislation:

 

http://www.michaelgeist.ca/content/view/6257/125/


contrarianna
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Joined: Aug 15 2006

6079_Smith_W wrote:

THey may have put it off in the states. Looks like there is a secret lobby to have SOPA provisions included in Canada's copyright legislation:

 

http://www.michaelgeist.ca/content/view/6257/125/

Michael Geist--as always-- is a must read on the reality of the government/corporate alliance for censorship.
Canada, if anything, is even less transparent in its lobbyist and government complicity than the US, as the wikileaks US/Canada diplomatic leaks exposed by Geist show.

--What do you call it when Harper government members secretly lobby the US government to put more pressure on Canada? Is more evidence needed of a Canadian colonial government looking out first for the interests of the beloved neoColonizer?

http://rabble.ca/babble/national-news/cons-conspire-us-elevate-canada-pi... ).

Geist also shows , in the article linked by smith, the already strong anti-piracy laws in action in both the US and Canada.

But rust never sleeps--and neither does the co-ordinated momentum of corporate greed and government oppression. If one door is barred, some window will be left open.


Unionist
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Joined: Dec 11 2005

contrarianna wrote:

But rust never sleeps--and neither does the co-ordinated momentum of corporate greed and government oppression. If one door is barred, some window will be left open.

Lovely!

And I agree about Geist - we're lucky to have him.


Fidel
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Joined: Apr 29 2004

contrarianna wrote:

--What do you call it when Harper government members secretly lobby the US government to put more pressure on Canada? Is more evidence needed of a Canadian colonial government looking out first for the interests of the beloved neoColonizer?

Linda McQuaig wrote that Canada's rich people(the oligarchs) do something similar when lobbying bond rating agencies in the U.S. to lower Canada's credit ratings from time to time. They would like very much for Canadian taxpayers to have to pay more on public debts owed to Canada's private creditors apparently. They should be horsewhipped.


radiorahim
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Joined: Jun 17 2002

To be fair, the Harper government aren't the only folks caving in to pressure from the U.S. infotainment industry.

Cory Doctorow wrote this article in the Guardian last November on how the BBC caved in to the U.S. television industry on digital restrictions management (DRM) on HDTV.   The BBC did so in secret...and one must remember that British TV viewers are required by law to pay the licensing fees that pay for the BBC.   Also, the British regulatory agency Ofcom maintained the secrecy of this deal.

I'm sure we'll see some other form of SOPA and PIPA introduced down the road in the U.S.   Coupled with this, the U.S. will continue to pressure governments around the world into adopting SOPA and PIPA type legislation.


contrarianna
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Joined: Aug 15 2006

radiorahim wrote:

To be fair, the Harper government aren't the only folks caving in to pressure from the U.S. infotainment industry.

....

The Harper government did not "cave" to pressure, they secretly advocated ways the US could apply more pressure to Canada (see earlier post).

That is, "The Harper Goverrnment" (tm), by preferential name and action, is not the "Government of Canada"since it is  apparently comprised of double agents.


NDPP
Online
Joined: Dec 27 2008

SOPA and PIPA Fully Alive and a New Bill Joins Them

http://www.activistpost.com/2012/01/sopa-and-pipa-fully-alive-and-new-bi...

"Actually SOPA is set to be reformulated in February, PIPA will be revisited with possible amendments in the coming weeks. Case in point, all is still open possible -- nothing is dead, pulled or cancelled. If that wasn't enough to keep us on our toes, a new, similar bill has surfaced.."


radiorahim
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Joined: Jun 17 2002

Quote:
The Harper government did not "cave" to pressure, they secretly advocated ways the US could apply more pressure to Canada (see earlier post).

Whatever the backroom machinations, I'm sure we can all agree that HarpoSOPA and HarpoPIPA are bad for everyone ;)

In other news, this bill was introduced into the Hawaii state legislature requiring ISP's to maintain records of absolutely everything you do online.  Fortunately after "vehement opposition" it was subsequently tabled.

It's clear to me that we're entering a period of time where governments and corporations are declaring war on computer and internet users.


radiorahim
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Joined: Jun 17 2002

According to this story on the EFF website Dutch courts have ordered ISP's to block access to Pirate Bay.   There's also a bit of an update on what's happening in other European countries.


radiorahim
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Joined: Jun 17 2002

It looks like the Swiss have got it right Cool

Quote:
The report argues that piracy is only a significant concern for "large foreign production companies," and that these large companies need to adapt to new consumer behavior rather than seeking further legislative changes. And, the report says, "fears that these changes have a negative impact on the Swiss cultural creativity are unfounded."

Read the rest on Ars Technica


Fidel
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Joined: Apr 29 2004

#9. Power of Corporations Protected

Quote:
Although the personal life of ordinary citizens was under strict control, the ability of large corporations to operate in relative freedom was not compromised. The ruling elite saw the corporate structure as a way to not only ensure military production (in developed states), but also as an additional means of social control. Members of the economic elite were often pampered by the political elite to ensure a continued mutuality of interests, especially in the repression of "have-not" citizens

Nein! Nein! Nein!


Fidel
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Joined: Apr 29 2004

Web censorship will force next generation nets

Quote:
A sponge net doesn't need any ISPs. (In fact, I've never really understood why the web needs them either, it is perfectly possible to build a web without them). Each device is autonomous. Each shares data with its immediate neighbours, and route dynamically according to a range of algorithms available to them. They can route data from A to B so that every packet goes by a different route of need be. Even without any encryption, only A and B can see the full message. The various databases that the web uses to tell packets where their destination is can be distributed. There is a performance price, but so what? You could even route geographically. Knowing the precise geographic location of your recipient, packets can simply use a map or GPS to get there. I'm not aware of any GPS based nets yet, but you could easily build one. I quite like the idea personally.

Mother should I trust the government? Let's bypass the fuckers.

Morpheus wrote:
The Matrix is a system, Neo. That system is our enemy. But when you're inside, you look around, what do you see? Businessmen, teachers, lawyers, carpenters. The very minds of the people we are trying to save. But until we do, these people are still a part of that system and that makes them our enemy. You have to understand, most of these people are not ready to be unplugged. And many of them are so inured, so hopelessly dependent on the system, that they will fight to protect it.


radiorahim
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Joined: Jun 17 2002

What might help in developing independent networks is a device like the Freedom Box.   I posted about it last summer here


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