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RevolutionPlease
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Joined: Oct 15 2007

Did anyone else catch the series put on by Clara Hughes and Michael Landsberg? They're both suffered from depression. More clinical for Michael, I believe. Anyhoo, Michael had a chat where they kind of ignored the question of whether it could be sociological rather than biological. Just kind of pushed pills, if you know what I mean?

 

I'm all for raising awareness, but was kind of sickened by the analysis. Where's the transparency? Honestly, it was like they were counselling folks to medicate.

 

So, let's talk.

 

 


Comments

RevolutionPlease
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Joined: Oct 15 2007

I am proud to be depressed.

 

Should we really wake up happy about the world we live in?

 

Damn right, I don't trust people. Have you seen what we do to each other?

 

Don't be afraid to speak out. We hear you and we have your back. I know there's a silent majority that will ignore me.

 

I'm getting better. Diet is important. Almost no sugar lately.

 

Anyone else get depression?


Freedom 55
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Joined: Mar 14 2010

RevolutionPlease wrote:

Just kind of pushed pills, if you know what I mean?

 

Pills, and telecommunications.

Bell wrote:

Canadians responded with 78,520,284 texts, long-distance calls and retweets – a 19% increase over the first Bell Let’s Talk Day in 2011.

http://letstalk.bell.ca/resources/media/sections/media/press/BLTD_result...


RevolutionPlease
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Joined: Oct 15 2007

Huh? 5cents from their profit? No sociological response? Yep, I called my folks. How couldn't I?

 

No pills. There's a better way...?

 

 


RevolutionPlease
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Joined: Oct 15 2007
No response. They still keep trying to drug folks up. I guess I need to find links. That could be hard. Thank goodness for Anonymous.

Catchfire
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Joined: Apr 16 2003

Oh my, I didn't know about this. Thanks RP.

I do have a soft spot for Clara Hughes, but I didn't listen to the show. F55's point about the profits Bell made from their "heartfelt" endeavour is a strong one. How terribly grotesque.


Caissa
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Joined: Jun 14 2006

This is the time of year where I experience SAD. My heart goes out to those who live with depression on a daily basis.


Slumberjack
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Joined: Aug 8 2005

I think it's a highly personal topic, which is not at all to say that it shouldn't be discussed; on the contrary; but I would describe the subject of depression as being somewhat similar to religion for example, where many people involved with it like to relate how they have their own personal relationship with some deity or another..like the born again who will sometimes say they walk with Jesus, where an image comes to mind of two people going hand in hand for a stroll. I really hate to drop this name once again, but given the topic I suggest Foucault's Madness and Civilization work as a backgrounder to any discussion involving conditions of the mind, particularly relating to those discussions found within the mainstream culture, institutions and scientific bodies. From there one could perhaps rewind to Albert Camus' The Myth of Sisyphus as part of a coping strategy of sorts, among many others no doubt that do not necessarily involve the pharmaceutical and couch industries.


Fidel
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Joined: Apr 29 2004

I can't help but think that the deterioration of society and democracy in general over the years have contributed to mental illness. We aren't living in a sane world. Not really. Over the last 30 years capitalists have created a world that increasingly meets the needs of capital not people. And they aren't even doing a good job of that. 

 Three decades three recessions, and if youre not a consumer, then you are an abomination. Having a hard time being a middle class consumer with a car and mortgage and expensive kids to raise? The dysfunctional economy and rotten financial system contribute to making people ill imo. It's like one big madhouse, and we're in it. Apparently it's even profitable to create mental illnesses in paving the way for snake oil cures: Funny Pharm

The cat: Everyone's mad here. 

The Hatter: Why is a raven like a writing desk?

 


epaulo13
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Joined: Dec 13 2009

..it was the left that taught me that i was not alone in my struggle to fit in. it continues to motivate me on those days that i just don't want to get out of bed.


Open Hand
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Joined: Mar 16 2010

Depression can be both biological and sociological.  Diet does help as does mediation.  Try even 10 minutes in the morning.  At first I had to force myself to sit still but now I can't start my day without some quiet meditation.  Just clear your mind.  There is so much pressure on us in this world to buy and conform.  Try to keep busy doing things you love.  Keep a journal.  Volunteer.  Join a group.  Go for a hike.  Try to be grateful for the good things in your life.  It all helps.


RevolutionPlease
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Joined: Oct 15 2007
You're right Open Hand, I've been trying to eat better. And I don't think I'd be here, if I kept up with my high school bros. I only like exercise when it's competitive. Thanks for all the responses. I have such a small experience. I wish everybody the best. Oh man, I sound weird. Meh. I'm gonna try and join a group. It does all help? Seriously, what if you're not down with that?

Rabble_Incognito
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Joined: Feb 21 2012

I'm depressed...

 

 

 

 

 

...but not when I wear Oakley sunglasses!

http://rabble.ca/babble/rabble-news-features/oakley-sunglasses-are-very-...

I use meds, cannabis and humour occasionally to lighten up the darkness. Cheers! Cool


oldgoat
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Joined: Jul 27 2001

I've had depression pretty much life long, sometimes not much present and then there are the debilitating times.  Ive been told that alchohol is to depression as sugar is to diabetes, but fuck it, I drink anyway.  (come to think of it I'm also diabetic, and occassionally indulge in sugar, but my numbers remain ok with medication, so fuck that too)

I've been off and on meds with mixed sucesses, and mixed side effect issues.  As most know, I'm a community mental health worker with CMHA, and get to look at the world through that side too.  The thing is, it's so much part of me, so mixed in with essence of who I am, that to try to eradicate it, a la the disease model of illness, is to deny part of who I am, to excorcise a piece of me as bad.  I guess in my old age I've become a bit sanguine about it, seeing it as as much a companion as a challenge.

Looking back to younger days, there were long dark times which are almost blocked from my memory, which were probably worse than they needed to be had I a bit greater insight.  During those times I was offered, and accepted because it was the easiest thing to do, all the negative labels that went with a sullen layabout, living on the edges of substance addiction and the criminal fringes, unable to hold a job for any length of time.  Took me a long time to gather those labels together, and "return to sender" so to speak.

 

Merchant of Venice 1:1

 

In sooth I know not why I am so sad

It wearies me, you say it wearies you

How I caught it, found it, or came by it,

What stuff 'tis made of,

I am to know.

Such wantwit sadness makes of me

That I am much ado to know myself

 

The world is always just a bit better in iambic pentameter.

 

All's well that ends well


Rabble_Incognito
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Joined: Feb 21 2012

I can understand having a drink OG - I'm the blue bandana guy you met with JR at the convention - I like it but it brings me down that's why I am better with coffee. Saying FI is often required . I'm finding that diabetes stuff is wicked dangerous. I'm trying to adjust diet because I'm in fear of diabetes. I've just seen my Dad go through some unbelievable problems from it.

Epaulo13 said "..it was the left that taught me that i was not alone in my struggle to fit in. it continues to motivate me on those days that i just don't want to get out of bed." That hits the mark for me - the people here have souls.


oldgoat
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Joined: Jul 27 2001

Ah, so that was you.  Your incognito-ness remains safe with me.  Yeah, thanks for that.  Actually my diet has always been not too bad.  My food vices are more salty greasy than sugar anyway.  I can enjoy a nice chocolate fresh from a chocolateer, but stop at one.


Fidel
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Joined: Apr 29 2004

I confess, I'm a chocoholic. There is some diabetes in our family but not a real history for it. A medical person showed us in a WHMIS thing how sugar thickens blood after one indulges in sugary delights. I swear the simulated blood she showed us turned to a consistency of syrup. In fact she mentioned the word syrup. And your heart has to pump this goo through many miles of blood vessels, nooks and crannies. 


Caissa
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Joined: Jun 14 2006

As I said upthread, I experience SAD. I'm not sure I have come to embrace it as part of who I am in the same way that oldgoat has. Of course, I'm younger than oldgoat. Wink Joking aside, it is something I struggle with at times in the winter when I feel like a black mist has descended upon my brain.

I was diagnosed with ADHD when I was 8 and took medication until I was 19. I stopped taking the medication and began consciously controlling some of my behaviours related to ADHD. I have made peace with this part of my personality many years ago. Behaviours now only manifest themselves when I am extremely weary. I try as much as possible to avoid some of the highs of emotional life that can trigger impulsive behaviour.

 


RevolutionPlease
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Joined: Oct 15 2007
Right on Caissa. I think we can get outside the box. Good luck. I've dealt with the black mist. Good strategy. See you soon!

RevolutionPlease
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Joined: Oct 15 2007
Slumberjack wrote:

I think it's a highly personal topic, which is not at all to say that it shouldn't be discussed; on the contrary; but I would describe the subject of depression as being somewhat similar to religion for example, where many people involved with it like to relate how they have their own personal relationship with some deity or another..like the born again who will sometimes say they walk with Jesus, where an image comes to mind of two people going hand in hand for a stroll. I really hate to drop this name once again, but given the topic I suggest Foucault's Madness and Civilization work as a backgrounder to any discussion involving conditions of the mind, particularly relating to those discussions found within the mainstream culture, institutions and scientific bodies. From there one could perhaps rewind to Albert Camus' The Myth of Sisyphus as part of a coping strategy of sorts, among many others no doubt that do not necessarily involve the pharmaceutical and couch industries.

I always love your posts SJ. I have no religion, so scratch that. I also can't absorb and catch complicated reading like Foucault or Camus. Perhaps some help? I'm straight from the streets and just have my experience. Meant to post this: http://www.thestar.com/living/health/article/1193532--mental-health-how-...

RevolutionPlease
Offline
Joined: Oct 15 2007
Fidel wrote:

I can't help but think that the deterioration of society and democracy in general over the years have contributed to mental illness. We aren't living in a sane world. Not really. Over the last 30 years capitalists have created a world that increasingly meets the needs of capital not people. And they aren't even doing a good job of that. 

 Three decades three recessions, and if youre not a consumer, then you are an abomination. Having a hard time being a middle class consumer with a car and mortgage and expensive kids to raise? The dysfunctional economy and rotten financial system contribute to making people ill imo. It's like one big madhouse, and we're in it. Apparently it's even profitable to create mental illnesses in paving the way for snake oil cures: Funny Pharm

The cat: Everyone's mad here. 

The Hatter: Why is a raven like a writing desk?

 

Spot on, as always. My anecdotal evidence points to our consumption.

RevolutionPlease
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Joined: Oct 15 2007
epaulo13 wrote:

..it was the left that taught me that i was not alone in my struggle to fit in. it continues to motivate me on those days that i just don't want to get out of bed.

Fuck, yeah!

RevolutionPlease
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Joined: Oct 15 2007
oldgoat wrote:

I've had depression pretty much life long, sometimes not much present and then there are the debilitating times.  Ive been told that alchohol is to depression as sugar is to diabetes, but fuck it, I drink anyway.  (come to think of it I'm also diabetic, and occassionally indulge in sugar, but my numbers remain ok with medication, so fuck that too)

I've been off and on meds with mixed sucesses, and mixed side effect issues.  As most know, I'm a community mental health worker with CMHA, and get to look at the world through that side too.  The thing is, it's so much part of me, so mixed in with essence of who I am, that to try to eradicate it, a la the disease model of illness, is to deny part of who I am, to excorcise a piece of me as bad.  I guess in my old age I've become a bit sanguine about it, seeing it as as much a companion as a challenge.

Looking back to younger days, there were long dark times which are almost blocked from my memory, which were probably worse than they needed to be had I a bit greater insight.  During those times I was offered, and accepted because it was the easiest thing to do, all the negative labels that went with a sullen layabout, living on the edges of substance addiction and the criminal fringes, unable to hold a job for any length of time.  Took me a long time to gather those labels together, and "return to sender" so to speak.

 

Merchant of Venice 1:1

 

In sooth I know not why I am so sad

It wearies me, you say it wearies you

How I caught it, found it, or came by it,

What stuff 'tis made of,

I am to know.

Such wantwit sadness makes of me

That I am much ado to know myself

 

The world is always just a bit better in iambic pentameter.

 

All's well that ends well

Sorry to give short thrift OG, but I wonder why we're so quick to judge??? Or so quick to give credence to the abstainers.

RevolutionPlease
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Joined: Oct 15 2007
Quote:
They may be surrounded by people, but they are alone, held hostage by their minds. They are with you on the bus, in the next cubicle and at the playground. They are teachers, lawyers and police officers, young and old, men and women. They live with pain. Some kill themselves as a final cure.
http://www.thestar.com/living/health/article/1193532--mental-health-how-...

Freedom 55
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Joined: Mar 14 2010

 

Thanks for posting, RP.

The gaps are huge, and one of the biggest ones is the lack of OHIP coverage for psychologists and counsellors. If you're poor and are willing to take whatever meds a doctor tells you to take then you might be able to get in to see a psychiatrist. But if you're wary of that sort of treatment, and would prefer talk therapy or some other approach, chances are you're going to have a hard time finding services that are both affordable and suited to your needs.


Slumberjack
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Joined: Aug 8 2005

RevolutionPlease wrote:
I also can't absorb and catch complicated reading like Foucault or Camus. Perhaps some help? I'm straight from the streets and just have my experience.

"You cannot create experience.  You must undergo it." - Albert Camus

"...if you are not like everybody else, then you are abnormal, if you are abnormal , then you are sick. These three categories, not being like everybody else, not being normal and being sick are in fact very different but have been reduced to the same thing" - Michel Foucault

I found Foucault to be more of a tough read than Camus, because similar to his contemporaries and predecessors he often wrote in the dense language of continental Philosophy.  Sometimes it can be like putting together a puzzle where new pieces are routinely introduced that didn't come with the box, usually arcane concepts written down by other philosophers, around which the entire argument of a paragraph or a chapter is being built.  Then you're forced to stop everything and examine it in order to entertain any hope of assembling a complete picture.  I find it a slow process because my streets were mostly dirt roads with many potholes.

The mind was bought back to Foucault just the other day when I read this article entitled "The Mind Druggers"

Quote:
... at the American Psychiatric Association's annual meeting in Philadelphia, attended by 11,000 psychiatrists, it was the same old same old. Instead of listening to the public outcry about overmedicated children, soldiers, elderly and everyday people watching too many drug ads, the psychiatry group re-affirmed its resolve to pathologize healthy people on behalf of its big brother, Big Pharma.


Fidel
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Joined: Apr 29 2004

And today if you are normal, you're abnormal and vice versa. It's no good trying to appear normal because then you might drown in a sea of abnormality. So take it from me you're more than likely normal and don't realize it. It's really only what you think that matters and everyone else is thinking the same. Use the force.


West Coast Greeny
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Joined: Sep 14 2004

I share my story when, and only when, I feel it might help other folks who struggle with the same issues I did.

I've personally had one horrifying battle with mental illness that evolved from anxiety, to depression, to worse depression, to a bout of psychosis that ended with a police arrest and a week-long stay at a hospital. This all happened despite the fact I tried to treat my problem with both medication and therapy. 

I was immensly lucky that, for all its dysfunctions, my family simply took me home without judgement and allowed me to (I should say, insisted I) just rest for a few months. I was prescribed some hella-powerful anti-psychotics, which left me exhausted and lifeless, but that was a massive improvement over deluded and hospitalized. A handful of months later my perscription ran its course, I was stable and I decided to move back out. Almost right away, I found all my demons returning: anxiety, depression, and even a couple flashes of psychosis which I'd snap out of within a few minutes - but steadily I learned how to take care of myself better until, by the one year anniversary of my hospitalization, I was by pretty well any measure healthy. A couple more years on and I'm still healthy. I'm not wholly sure what worked for me will work for others, but I'll write down what I've learned and what I tell myself:

- The voices are not my friends. They'll put you in the hospital, and hospitals are boring and have lame food. 
- On a related note: You've been an atheist since you were 7. God isn't talking to you.
- On another related note: Ignore the folks that say God/spirituality is the answer. They usually mean well but they don't understand that that stuff straight up doesn't make an ounce of sense to me.
- Don't define yourself as "a mentally ill person" or "crazy", define yourself as "some who suffered from mental illness" or "someone who suffered a touch of crazy". Removing your mental illness from your personal identity makes it easier to tackle the problem.
- Approach life with a sense of humour and confidence, even overconfidence. It's more fun that way.
- Look to yourself for a sense of self-worth, not other people. 
- Take care of yourself physically. Get 8 hours of sleep. Eat healthy. Exercise. Rest when you're sick. 
- Take care of yourself mentally. I try to keep my stress levels down, I try to limit the amount of drama I allow into my life. I set boundries to keep people from pushing me around. 

That's about it.


Catchfire
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Joined: Apr 16 2003

bump


takeitslowly
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Joined: May 31 2009

I have always been depressed since i was a bullied teenager.I faced hmophobia and transphoia. I took many different medications , I am still on Effezor. I never had many friends. My mom love me unconditionally . I am 30 now. My mom  died on Feb 18, 2014 from lung cancer. She never smoked. She was the only one who loved me unconditionally and my reasn for living. she was a single mother. I She was so happy when  i graudated from York University but i wasnt able to find a stable job even till now. She had to work many jobs because she had little education and couldnt speak english very well (her father forced her to work as al ittle girl in Hong Kong)  we had debt and my older brother wdidn't help us with the rent because he doesnt accept my transgender identity. He began to distance himself from my mom and myself and even though we all LIVED in the same roof. my mom still loves him and myself uncondtionally. She worked hard all her life and always put my needs ahead of herself and  then she died horribly. Thats life as I know it.

 

 I can say now that i am more depressed as ever. In fact, I dont even want to live.  But i am afraid of pain so I am not going to kill myself. I will be depressed forever. Life is cruel and forever will be because my mom , the most only  important person in life had to suffer so much in her life and died so tragically and at a relatively young age. How can I not be depressed?


onlinediscountanvils
Online
Joined: Jun 7 2012

Sorry for your loss, takeitslowly. Do you have people in your life who you can talk to about your depression and grief? Even if you don't have supportive family and friends to talk to, there might be counselling services or peer support that you could access.


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