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Student Strike #10: aux 100 prochains jours

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Mniemoeller
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Joined: May 10 2012

No, considering the wider context of these protests embracing the vision of a better society via good governance, achieving the original goal is no longer valid. Political opposition to the status quo precludes joining present political actors in favour of a new party that represents the principles and policies of the future generation.


Catchfire
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Joined: Apr 16 2003

How much energy have the students put into "riot and mayhem"? From what I've seen, that's been the purview of the police, not the students.

At any rate, I find it extremely glib to tell students--historically and repeatedly betrayed by elected officials--how best to achieve the change they seek. Especially in the face of the most compelling and sustained demonstration againt entitled old-style politics for decades.


Catchfire
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Joined: Apr 16 2003

One thing that's struck me lately is the increased insistence by Montreal municipal politicians and Charest stenographers that this hullabaloo will not be allowed to stand as thie city approaches tourist season. The F1 race is two weeks away and, we are promised, the city will be back in working order by then. Not only does this strained insistence ring false, it's also a strategic error: what better way to tell the students that they have the government and city over a barrell?


Slumberjack
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Joined: Aug 8 2005

Catchfire wrote:
At any rate, I find it extremely glib to tell students--historically and repeatedly betrayed by elected officials--how best to achieve the change they seek.

I don't know if it can be described as glib, precisely because of the historical track of being susceptible to betrayal. Wouldn't it more resemble a mercy shout-out at this point?


Boom Boom
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Joined: Dec 29 2004

I doubt that the F1 race will go ahead. This strike thing will still be ongoing, and as more get pissed off with Charest's draconian new law (78) it can only grow. Screw F1, that's a rich people's sport.


kropotkin1951
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Joined: Jun 6 2002

Here is a good photo journal of Tuesday's protests.

The protests are now entering a new stage.  The police seem to be arresting people not giving them statutory fines.  That normally leads to bail conditions not to protest or meet with people who are involved in organizing protests.  Anyone brave enough to  breach those conditions are in criminal contempt of the courts and they will be incarcerated.  Even if it means sentencing a sick grandmother to jail without a worry that the jail conditions could end her life the courts will incarcerate for not following their orders.

So the bouncing ball is the police have the absolute right to declare any protest illegal.  Once it is declared illegal anyone may be arrested.  In practice in Canada that in large part means targeted arrests of the protestors that various spy agencies have determined to be capable of displaying leadership skills.  Then those activists are hauled in front of a judge who says you may not protest anymore or we will imprison you.  That is the way it has always been in Canada.  It has been used against environmental activists as well as trade unionists. 

I can only hope that at least on the left people begin to awaken to the reality that the right to protest in Canada has always been an illusion.  The Clayoquot Sound protest in BC was successful because they had new people ready to be arrested day after day.  As well they faced off against an NDP government that eventually solved the problem by mediation and negotiation.  By contrast the BC Liberals looking out on more than 50,000 on the lawns of the legislature on February 23, 2003 told reporters they were all union thugs and of course they would not be listened to.

http://montreal.mediacoop.ca/photo/manifestation-montreal-22-mai-2012/11009


Boom Boom
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Joined: Dec 29 2004

Our Not-So-Friendly Northern Neighbor Quebec is trampling basic democratic rights in order to end student protests against tuition increases.


Slumberjack
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Joined: Aug 8 2005

One might begin by now to consider that the Charest government's existence is incompatible with all human existence in that province, and that they should all go as one of the necessary and non-negotiable preconditions for a return to civil obedience.


Boom Boom
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Joined: Dec 29 2004

And yet self-righteous pricks from the Charest government appear on the news daily to say they are the government of 8 million people and are not going to be dictated to by a small minority of students in the province. I think this will continue for a while yet, maybe right up to the next Quebec election.


NDPP
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Joined: Dec 27 2008

Sun Poll:

http://www.sunnewsnetwork.ca/poll/index.html

"Should the Canadian military be called to restore order in Quebec if the government can't do it?


Freedom 55
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Joined: Mar 14 2010

Ha!

Student leader wins Lieutenant Governor’s medal

 

Quote:

Quebec has essentially told one of its most controversial student leaders – one who has encouraged a strike that has caused months of turmoil on the province’s streets and in its political corridors – to keep up the good work.

Despite her calls for civil disobedience in the face of Quebec’s new Bill 78, Jeanne Reynolds – one of the co-spokespeople for the province’s most militant student associations – has been awarded the Lieutenant Governor’s medal for her academic excellence and her social involvement.

Reynolds, who received the medal as an arts student at the Collège de Valleyfield, is one of the representatives of the Coalition large de l’association pour une solidarité syndicale étudiante (CLASSE), considered the most hard-line among the major student groups. The government has consistently refused to negotiate with the CLASSE, even when it has agreed to talk to the other student groups during the 15-week-long boycott of classes to protest tuition hikes.


kropotkin1951
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Joined: Jun 6 2002

If this is becoming a right wing trial balloon then it is clearly something that Mulcair can speak against. If people are calling on the federal government to become involved then he has to wade into the fray. I suspect that the Orange Wave that elected 59 NPD MP's is either in the streets or supportive of the protestors and view the police riots as abhorrent.  He should be very careful about how he treats his Quebec base or a BQ revitalized by the student strike will regain many of their seats.


epaulo13
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Joined: Dec 13 2009
Feminist scholar Judith Butler foresees rising repression against protests in the western world

quote:

Butler mentioned that new laws—such as Quebec’s Bill 78—are often justified by authorities in the name of security for dignitaries and the global economy. She highlighted the fact that many protesters are in the streets to demonstrate about their lack of “security” over such basic needs as shelter, employment, and health care.

“Wealth is accumulating at accelerated speed for fewer and fewer people,” Butler stated. “And conditions of precarity are being intensified at an accelerated speed for more and more people. It’s not exactly the traditional conception of class warfare, but it is our very contemporary version.”

Under Bill 78, police must receive eight hours’ notice of any demonstration involving more than 50 people. Authorities can order demonstrators to move their protest to a different location. Encouraging someone to protest is illegal, and people can be fined up to $5,000 for preventing someone from entering an educational institution. For these actions, student leaders face fines of up to $35,000, and student federations face maximum fines of $125,000.

“I think if those demonstrations can bring the routine operation of a university to a halt, that means they are exercising quite a bit of power,” Butler declared. “I actually think the Montreal students’ strikes have been among the most powerful.”

Butler stated that in Berkeley, a legal case has been made that demonstrating students pose security risks for the university. She added that sometimes, the law works to “shore up military and police power”.

“The more we see courts and judges accept that kind of argumentation, the more serious this conflict will become because there is no recourse even to basic classical liberal precepts of freedom of speech and freedom of assembly under those conditions,” Butler said. “That is very, very frightening. Some would even say that those kinds of laws that prohibit assembly and free speech on grounds of state security are emblematic of fascism. I’m not saying we live in a fascist society, but I am saying those are the hallmarks. So it’s extremely important that these kinds of legal decisions not become normalized or accepted as reasonable. And it does mean that extra-legal forms of resistance will become more and more important.”

Judith Butler will deliver UBC’s Peter Wall Institute for Advanced Studies free spring lecture at 7:30 p.m. on Thursday (May 24) at the Vogue Theatre.

http://www.straight.com/article-692066/vancouver/prof-foresees-rising-br...


epaulo13
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Joined: Dec 13 2009
Quebec Education Minister Michelle Courchesne Ready To Meet With Students, Bill 78 Not Up For Debate

The Quebec government has set strict conditions for any resumption of negotiations with student strike leaders: there will be no talk of a tuition freeze, and no question of scrapping a newly enacted emergency law.

Barring that, Education Minister Michelle Courchesne suggested Wednesday that there will be no return to the bargaining table in a dispute that has made international news.

"I'm not giving up. I'm very tenacious, very determined,'' Courchesne said. "I want to talk to them, and it's up to them to take some steps so that we might talk.''....

http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2012/05/23/quebec-education-minister-michel...


NDPP
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Joined: Dec 27 2008

Quebec Premier Replaces Chief of Staff Amid Student Crisis

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montreal/story/2012/05/24/montreal-arrests...

"694 arrested in Montreal and Quebec city protests...officers were ordering the demonstraters to leave, but were blocking the way out.."


kropotkin1951
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Joined: Jun 6 2002

Its too bad that the CBC can't afford to hire reporters to go out into the streets and they have to rely on police spokespeople for their stories.


epaulo13
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Joined: Dec 13 2009
Red Square, Everywhere:
With Quebec Student Strikers, Against Repression

quote:

Democratic Activist Student Unionism

The core of democratic activist student unionism is the recognition that students, like workers, have collective interests (e.g. quality accessible public education) and a potential for collective power that needs to be organized to be effective in defending these interests. This kind of student unionism depends on finding ways of fighting collectively around immediate and local issues as well as challenging government policies. Solidarity is at the core of this collective power, both within the student movement and with other allies in social movements.

The potential collective power of students can only become a real force when students have developed capacities to analyze their situation, communicate with each other and act in concert, confident that others will also join the fight. Governments and university administrations will only really pay attention to student unions that have mobilized and knowledgeable memberships willing to take action to back up demands.

The General Membership Meeting (GMM) plays and important role in this process, as it puts transparent collective and democratic decision-making at the core of the student union. Here, students gather to debate and pass motions to establish the direction of their union. The GMM also elects and supervises delegates to Quebec-wide congresses that coordinate overall campaigns. The GMM is a rich and challenging venue, where activists must engage their fellow students, listen to counter-arguments and attempt to persuade others that mobilization is necessary and possible.

The scale of these meetings varies on different campuses. In some places, student unionism is organized around specific departments, schools or faculties, while in others it is campus-wide. ASSÉ did not invent the GMM, which is written into the constitution of many student unions as a result of the long history of militancy in the Quebec student movement. Rather, ASSÉ developed mobilizing strategies that used the democratic decision-making of the GMM as a key component of campus activism....

http://www.socialistproject.ca/bullet/640.php


love is free
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Joined: May 21 2012

judith butler is a personal hero of mine.

charest has replaced his chief of staff.  every bit of momentum is with the protesters now, tourism season disruptions will be catastrophic for the premier, a sure-fire recipe for a complete electoral wipe-out.

not to sound hyperbolic, but at this point, i'd be willing to bet that charest elects not to contest the next election.


love is free
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Joined: May 21 2012

contrast an opinion piece like this with anything in any english canadian daily.  here's the google translation.


Slumberjack
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Joined: Aug 8 2005

kropotkin1951 wrote:
Its too bad that the CBC can't afford to hire reporters to go out into the streets and they have to rely on police spokespeople for their stories.

What's the diff from when they could afford it?  At least in not being there, the usual Sgt. Shultz routine they perform manages to convince at least.


lagatta
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Joined: Apr 17 2002
I'd just love it if the protestors could call a halt to the bloody FI Grand Pricks and Bernie Ecclestone's extortion. Last year, some environmentalists and sympathizers of the S-L-O-W movement (slow food, slow travel, etc) held a small, pleasant demo in Parc Lafontaine, where one can hear the vroumm-vroumm of the race, over and over and over. I just hope we can get out a more significant protest this year. There have been anti-Grand-Prix protests in several countries where it is run. Of course restauranteurs and hoteliers won't be happy - there are many, many other reasons tourists come to Montréal in the summer, but alas your usual cultural or even gastronomic-inclined tourist doesn't spend as much as those high rollers, who are blowing pots of money to show off. As for electoral organising, there are two fairly new parties, Québec solidaire if you want to turn left; the CAQ if you think Charest should be more hardline. I've been a QS member since its founding. But politics does not stop or start at the ballot box, it also involves protests and other forms of citizen action.

Boom Boom
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Joined: Dec 29 2004

lagatta wrote:
I'd just love it if the protestors could call a halt to the bloody FI Grand Pricks and Bernie Ecclestone's extortion. 


NDPP
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Joined: Dec 27 2008

May 23: Police Attack CUTV's Journalists and Kettle Protesters (and vid)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QwFE6WUzcfo&feature=player_embedded

as always people's alternative media standing strong and free and with the people

www.cutvmontreal.ca/live


Boom Boom
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Joined: Dec 29 2004
Kaith Marouf of CUTV is giving an interview on CBC saying how the people were treated once they were kettled - very shocking behaviour from the Quebec riot cops.

6079_Smith_W
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Joined: Jun 10 2010

love is free wrote:

contrast an opinion piece like this with anything in any english canadian daily.  here's the google translation.

I take it you have read Barbara Kay's latest piece in the National Post. As racist as it is, at least she implies that Charest is partly to blame, since he is caretaker of what she calls the "nanny state".

 

 


NDPP
Online
Joined: Dec 27 2008

The Maple Spring in Quebec (MP3)  - Yves Engler and Brendan Stone

http://toronto.mediacoop.ca/audio/maple-spring-quebec/11019

"500,000 Students and citizens march in Montreal to protest the dictatorship of the bean-counters. Yves Engler gives us a report.."


epaulo13
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Joined: Dec 13 2009

epaulo13
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Joined: Dec 13 2009
Red Square Revolt – Quebec Students on Strike

A film by Nate Lavey

Nate was visiting Montreal last weekend and made this amazing documentary. It does a great job explaining the history and evolution of the student movement.

http://vimeo.com/42702955



Leigh
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Joined: Feb 26 2012

Police assaulting ought to be arrested, including the one/s caught acting as provocateurs.

Kettling, reported on CBC pm news, illegally contravenes civil rights.

C. Majka in an article at rabble today says education could be paid for instead of fighter jets, which is true.

It's also true though that the Harper government can, and ought to, create money for post-secondary education, other public services, job creation (without undermining workers' EI, paid for by workers), using its Constitutional powers to spend, account deficits, and do so without borrowing if the electorate chooses (W.Black, 'Why Does Uncle Sam Borrow?' New Economic perspectives).

Canada has similar powers- National Farmers' Union, The Union Farmer Quarterly Winter 2011 Vol.17, p.15 ):

"Canada's Constitutional Supreme Law orders our Federal Government to create this country's entire money supply and spend it into circulation - debt and interest-free."

This quote paints a different picture than a statement in an otherwise very good article (especially regarding direct democracy) linked from Maysie's post in the Student Strike 9 thread http://montreal.mediacoop.ca/story/ten-points-everyone-should-know-about... :

"The authors of the report from the Institut de recherche et d’informations socio-economique explained that, “Since governments underwrite those loans, if students default it could be catastrophic for public finances,” and that, “If the bubble explodes, it could be just like the mortgage crisis.

Governments, unlike Greece, which create their own fiat currency as Canada does, can create as much currency as is needed for public services, jobs, environment, etc.  They simply type it in. (www.neweconomicperspectives.org, MMTP). (The ECB has this power and ought to use it instead of dismantling social programs/jobs/human rights in member countries, for additional profits of creditors.)

If students default it wouldn't be 'catastrophic' for public finances, and if the bubble explodes, it might be like the mortgage crisis and government would type up the money for the creditors, and on we would go, like we did last time, like we do every time.

The problem, though, is what happens to the people who've lost their homes, and students - do they have to stop going to school?

So really governments with the power to create currency ought to use their power, without debt and interest-free, to fund public education directly, provide homes for those who lost them, along with other services necessary to uphold our human rights, green public energy, and clean up of the Earth.

 


epaulo13
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Joined: Dec 13 2009
N.S. students back Quebec peers

King’s College group says it shares opposition to costs

A Nova Scotia university student union is doing its part to show support for striking peers in Quebec.

“While students in Quebec may be facing different circumstances than those in Nova Scotia we share the same fight against cuts to our social services and an increasingly underfunded education system,” King’s student union officials said in a letter to the striking students.

“Your student movement has served as a source of inspiration for us here in Nova Scotia and we respect your memberships’ decision to stay on strike as a necessary step in fighting the ever-increasing price of an education.”....

http://thechronicleherald.ca/novascotia/99568-ns-students-back-quebec-peers

........................

Stop the tuition hikes: Filipino Canadian youth stand in solidarity with Quebec student strike

National statement
May 24, 2012

Toronto, ON—With the Quebec student strike now into its third month, Ugnayan ng Kabataang Pilipino Sa Canada/Filipino Canadian Youth Alliance—National (UKPC/FCYA) stand in solidarity with the student movement in Quebec and beyond by calling for an end to the ongoing assault against our access to education and to reject the tuition hikes and cuts against university education proposed by Quebec’s Liberal Party. For many youth across Canada today, alongside the over 200,000 strong who have mobilized in Quebec, the greatest disruption to our lives are not the wave of public protests and strikes that have sprung up throughout streets nationwide, but instead is the onslaught of the neoliberal agenda that denies us our entitlement to universally accessible public education and the basic right to determine our futures and to fully participate in Canadian society......


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