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Student Strike #10: aux 100 prochains jours

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cco
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Joined: Apr 25 2005
Boom Boom wrote:

ETA: Are these demonstrations anywhere near the F1 race location? I wonder if that's the reason the riot cops decided to act? 

The race itself is, I believe, held at Parc Jean-Drapeau, on an island in the middle of the St. Lawrence, where the casino and La Ronde are. So that, in and of itself, should be relatively easy for police to secure, as the only ways in and out are via bridge or metro. However, Grand Prix time typically floods downtown with a human wall of tourists and revelers, particularly on Crescent Street (and there are no hotels on the island, anyway), and a protest in the middle of *that* would pose a real challenge for police.

epaulo13
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Joined: Dec 13 2009
Laurier faculty to send funds to striking Quebec students

The faculty association at Wilfrid Laurier University has pledged its support to striking students in Quebec.

At a general meeting on Thursday morning, the association voted to provide $10,000 to help defray legal costs amassed by student groups or individuals, said president Judy Bates.

The association will also send a letter to Quebec Premier Jean Charest denouncing the passage of an emergency law, Bill 78, and its “attack on civil liberties and human rights,” Bates said.

The association joins a host of other groups and unions from across Canada that have sent money to Quebec to go towards everything from fines to the buses and food needed for the ongoing protests.....

http://www.therecord.com/news/local/article/730756--laurier-faculty-to-s...


epaulo13
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Joined: Dec 13 2009
Ministry scolds bureaucrats who support Que. students

Quebec's education department chided employees this month for openly supporting the student strike movement while on the job, QMI Agency has learned.

QMI obtained a memo, dated May 3, sent to all ministry employees reminding them of their ethical obligations.

"A few employees of the education ministry are wearing symbols connected with the anti-tuition-hike movement when they are at work and performing their duties," read part of the memo.

"You have the obligation of loyalty and allegiance towards (the education department), which requires you to defend the interests of the ministry."

The memo is part of a series of documents related to a complaint against the ministry that a department staffer filed with Quebec's Human Rights Commission.

A source close to the case said the employee has complained to the commission about the emergency law enacted on May 18, that bans spontaneous protests of more than 50 people and imposes heavy fines on anyone caught preventing someone from attending classes.....

http://vancouver.24hrs.ca/News/national/2012/05/25/19799761.html


Mniemoeller
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Joined: May 10 2012

Unionist wrote:

Pot-banging demonstrations were reported in many neighbourhoods of Montréal, as well as other towns (Sherbrooke, Trois-Rivières, Gatineau, Granby, Québec, Saguenay, Saint-Jérôme, La Prairie, Saint-Basile-le-Grand, and Saint-Eustache).

A demonstration of 500 in Granby!?

Something is happening here, and you don't know what it is. Do you, Mr. Charest?

 

Excellent strategic manoevre to gain popular support and to deflect attempts by authority to brand the protests 'illegal'. Moving away from confrontation with authority toward a popular revolt a la Orange Revolution will snowball.

Of course, the passionate embrace of pot banging is an added bonus.


Leigh
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Joined: Feb 26 2012

"There were no reports of injuries or casualties." from post 71 link. 

vs.

"There were calls for an independent investigation into how one demonstrator, Maxence Valade, lost an eye and another, Alexandre Allard, was knocked unconscious – suffering a skull fracture and brain contusion after being hit in the head by what many witnesses said was a plastic bullet." Vancouver Sun, Montreal Gazette, http://www.vancouversun.com/news/never+seen+police+like+this/6582164/sto..., linked from Co-op Montreal noted in post 70,which had a clear report.

Students who protested at the FTAA in Quebec City were injured with plastic bullet wounds, some were beaten, hospitalized, and a Quebec police provocateur dressed as a protester was proven to be throwing rocks at Montebello.  It's good that police are being held accountable following the G20. When will police behaving illegally get charged in Quebec for current protests?

---


Leigh
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Joined: Feb 26 2012

i'm glad the CBC was clear about

"Bill 78, which was adopted last week to widespread criticism.." (post73).

i'll read through other items...


Catchfire
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Joined: Apr 16 2003

Mniemoeller wrote:
Of course, the passionate embrace of pot banging is an added bonus.

Ha! I suppose that's the kind of "riot and mayhem" we can agree upon, Mneimöller.


Leigh
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Joined: Feb 26 2012

It's good to hear that the Greens critiqued Bill 78, which would affect all 'spontaneous gatherings of 50 people or more', including Indigenous dissent. Indigenous people lived on the land first, and have rights...

It's good Quebec students are challenging Bill 78 in court, that Wilfred Laurier faculty are supporting the students, that people in towns and villages and other cities, provinces, and internationally are acting too, noting the inequality and injustice rampant today.

One hundred days opposing harrassment and assault- physical, economic, political, and emotional,  is a Strength.

re:83, on Harper's shameful record- 'Canadian voters are responsible for this', well, perhaps not entirely, given electoral fraud, which ought to be investigated and reported, not swept under the rug.  Also, though we may experience set-backs, it's never 'the end of social justice'..

re:93; Quebec's education dept. issued a very heavy-handed statement: "You have the obligation of loyalty and allegiance towards (the education department), which requires you to defend the interests of the ministry." Was that spelled out in employment contracts? And even if it was, the interests of the ministry are to defend the interests of students, to support full funding and to stop increased debt for students, rather than help bankers get richer.

It's in all our interest to defend the interests of students, and defend our own interests against illegal and irresponsible behaviour by those in power.

Responsible government behaviour involves spending -creating- money, debt and interest-free, to provide universal public services and jobs, and laws to restrain bankers' power to prevent responsible government.


 


laine lowe
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Joined: Dec 15 2006

Events unfolding in Quebec are so insprining when everything coming from the Harper Regime is so bleak. Let's hope this people power spreads.

That's my hope in this very bleak landscape.


Bärlüer
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Joined: Aug 20 2007

Leigh wrote:

re:93; Quebec's education dept. issued a very heavy-handed statement: "You have the obligation of loyalty and allegiance towards (the education department), which requires you to defend the interests of the ministry." Was that spelled out in employment contracts? 

The obligation of loyalty (of an employee toward its employer) is a legal obligation set out by the Civil Code of Quebec that applies to all employment contracts.

But there are other norms at play here than the obligation of loyalty—most particularly freedom of expression.

The article isn't clear on what exactly the memo said, though, so it's hard to comment further on that. (Were they asked not to wear the red square? Not mentioned. Were disciplinary measures threatened/taken? Not mentioned. Etc.)


6079_Smith_W
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Joined: Jun 10 2010

Bärlüer wrote:

The obligation of loyalty (of an employee toward its employer) is a legal obligation set out by the Civil Code of Quebec that applies to all employment contracts.

Wow. That's a piece of law right out of the 12th century. Is there a clear definition of what that means? Because the way the minister seems to be spinning it is that they have to support the policy of the government of the day.

Does that include requiring that government workers vote for them too? 

 


cco
Online
Joined: Apr 25 2005
How times have changed...

6079_Smith_W
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Joined: Jun 10 2010

@ cco

Probably not,  though evidently they had prettier window dressing for their election campaigns back then.

 


Unionist
Online
Joined: Dec 11 2005

Wow, good find, cco!

 


bekayne
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Joined: Jan 23 2006

Boom Boom wrote:

Except there's no left alternative in Quebec provincial politics aside from QS which has, what, one elected member, and 4% of the popular vote. 

Latest polls have them around 10%

http://www.threehundredeight.blogspot.ca/2012/05/pq-and-liberals-neck-and-neck-as-caq.html

 


Bärlüer
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Joined: Aug 20 2007

6079_Smith_W wrote:

Bärlüer wrote:

The obligation of loyalty (of an employee toward its employer) is a legal obligation set out by the Civil Code of Quebec that applies to all employment contracts.

Wow. That's a piece of law right out of the 12th century.

Well the terms "master-servant relationship" are still used sometimes to this day...

This is in no way specific to Quebec BTW: the same kind of obligation exists WRT employment contracts in common law jurisdictions.

6079_Smith_W wrote:
 Is there a clear definition of what that means?

Here's something:

Quote:
Implied in every contract of employment as a matter of law is a general duty of good faith and fidelity. This duty has been characterized as is the “bedrock duty” from which all of the specific implied obligations of the employee ultimately derive; an “all pervasive, residual obligation to further the interests of the employer which is not capable of exhaustive categorization but which can be relied upon by the courts to compel ‘faithful’ service in a myriad of work situations”.

The essence of the duty of good faith and fidelity is the requirement that an employee act honestly and faithfully during the term of employment. Among other things this means that an employee must always put the employer’s best interests first and avoid any conflicting personal interests

6079_Smith_W wrote:
Because the way the minister seems to be spinning it is that they have to support the policy of the government of the day.

It of course doesn't go that far.

There are a number of cases revolving around employees wearing pins, or t-shirts, etc. at work. The results vary depending on the circumstances. Ergo my saying that we don't know much from the article about what exactly the memo was asking.


Bärlüer
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Joined: Aug 20 2007

6079_Smith_W wrote:

@ cco

Probably not,  though evidently they had prettier window dressing for their election campaigns back then.

For the benefit of people who don't read French:

cco is saying "How times have changed" because this ad for the PLQ actually advocated for "completely free tuition—from elementary school to university, inclusively, provided that the student has the required talent and will".


Leigh
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Joined: Feb 26 2012

"This incredible movement sparked by the student strike against increased tuition fees has morphed into a powerful mass movement against austerity measures and repressive policies."

http://rabble.ca/news/2012/05/night-march-magic-quebec-peoples-movement-....

-

the news clipping says the Liberals supported free education from public school to university, including housing, clothes, and other needs of students, that the province is responsible for providing education.

 


Catchfire
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Joined: Apr 16 2003

Long thread!


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