New film 'The Elephant Queen' explores stories the animals tell

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The Elephant Queen

Stories where we find parts of ourselves hidden within are sometimes the best ones to tell.  The world around us has much to teach us if we take the time to step back, listen and reflect. Relationships matter, connection is essential with friends, family and others as we all try and find our way back home in a literal and metaphorical sense. Longing for connection within our communities and environments we learn much from the world in the way that ecosystems and animals live, move and build their lives together. Nature has a way of teaching and guiding us in a particular way if we’re willing to pay attention to the details.

The Elephant Queen is a genre redefining film starring the ultimate leading lady, Athena, an elephant matriarch who will do everything in her power to protect her family when they are forced to leave their waterhole.  Narrated by Chiwetel Ejiofor, this epic story of love, loss and coming home is a timely love letter to a species that could be gone from our planet in a generation.

Mark Deeble and Victoria Stone and Face2Face host David Peck talk about their new film The Elephant Queen, the house with the white picket fence, what its like the day after the protest, public love and activism and why we should all put on a ridiculous dress from time to time.

About the Directors: Mark Deeble and Victoria Stone immersed themselves with their subjects, living up close and personal with Athena and her herd for over four years. Truly earning their reputations as gentle giants, these majestic creatures are captured in the most intimate moments — highlighting the striking similarities between elephants and people. It's a harrowing and remarkable journey through a magnificent landscape and is a touching tribute to a vanishing species. The Elephant Queen is a compelling story of unbreakable familial bonds and an unwillingness to give up.

Mark Deeble co-directed, filmed and wrote The Elephant Queen. ​He is a celebrated cinematographer who, together with his partner Victoria Stone, has produced multi-award winning 'authored' films both above and below water for 30 years. He worked on Terrence Malick’s Voyage of Time as well as the BBC’s Enchanted Kingdom and IMAX Africa 3D. 

Victoria Stone co-directed and produced The Elephant Queen. She and Mark have worked together in Africa for over 30 years, telling wildlife stories that have been shown in more than 140 countries with audiences in excess of 600 million.​ Their films have won over 100 international awards in recognition of their artistry and wildlife story telling. Victoria has an MA from the Royal College of Art and her work has included cinematography, producing, directing and editing.

Image Copyright: Mark Deeble and Victoria Stone. Used with permission.

For more information about David Peck’s podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit his site here.

With thanks to producer Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

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