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'Silence of Others' remembers the crimes against humanity of Spain's General Franco

Silence of Others

Almudena Carracedo and Robert Bahar talk to David Peck talk about their new film, Silence of Others.  They explore the narrative of the Spanish people about the their country under the brutal hand of General Francisco Franco, the military dictator who ruled Spain from 1939 until his death in 1975.

It's a story about human rights and why politics, ideology and pushing back against the status quo matters. Silence of Others brings to the screen the epic struggle that the victims of Spain’s 40-year dictatorship have endured in their ongoing and passionate desire for justice. Filmed over six years, the film follows victims and survivors as they fight a state-imposed amnesia of crimes against humanity, in a country still divided four decades into democracy.

The Silence of Others is directed/produced by Emmy-winning filmmakers Almudena Carracedo and Robert Bahar. It had its world premiere at the 2018 Berlinale in the Panorama section, where it won both the Panorama Audience Award for Best Documentary and the Berlinale Peace Prize.

Biography

Born in Madrid, Spain, Almudena Carracedo has developed her professional career in the US, where she directed and produced her debut feature film, the Emmy-winning documentary Made in L.A. She is a Guggenheim Fellow, a Creative Capital Fellow, a Sundance Time Warner Documentary Fellow, a United States Artists Fellow, and the recipient of an honorary doctorate from Illinois Wesleyan University. Prior to Made in L.A., she directed the short documentary Welcome, A Docu-Journey of Impressions, which won Silverdocs Sterling Prize. In 2012 Almudena returned to Spain to begin work on The Silence of Others.

Born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Robert Bahar lives and works between Madrid, Spain and Brooklyn, New York. He won an Emmy as producer/writer of the documentary Made in L.A., and he spearheaded a three-year impact campaign that brought the film to audiences around the world. Prior to Made in L.A., he produced and directed the documentary Laid to Waste, and line produced several independent films. Robert is a Creative Capital Fellow, a Sundance Documentary Fellow, and holds an MFA from the University of Southern California’s School of Cinema-Television.

Image Copyright: Almudena Carracedo & Robert Bahar. Used with permission.

For more information about his podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit his site here.

With thanks to producer Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

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