This Week on Media Mornings: Jun 29—Canadian & global news hour

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This Week on Media Mornings is a weekly independent Canadian and global news hour, featuring the top headlines and commentators from the past week. We bring you news you won’t hear anywhere else — a grassroots view on the week’s top global and national affairs.

02:45 — This week’s top news headlines from across Canada and around the world (see below). Produced & hosted by David P. Ball.

18:45 — Interview with Naveen Mehta (Director of Human Rights for United Food and Commercial Workers, UFCW Canada) about the case of José Sicajau Xoc, and the fight for justice for Temporary Foreign Workers. Interviewed June 24 by Jane Bouey.

26:45 — Interview with Kate Milberry (Toronto-based expert on cyber surveillance), about National Security Agency whistleblower Edward Snowden's whereabouts and the U.S. espionage charges against him. Interviewed June 25 by Irwin Oostindie.

34:45 — Interview with Daniel Wilson (former Canadian diplomat & ex-Assembly of First Nations policy & planning director), about his new report for the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives and Save the Children Canada, Poverty or Prosperity Indigenous children in Canada. This study finds that Indigenous children in Canada are over two and a half times more likely to live in poverty than non-Indigenous children. Interviewed June 21, National Aboriginal Day, by Derrick O'Keefe.

47:15 — Interview with Tyler Levitan (Independent Jewish Voices Canada campaign coordinator) talks about the revelations that Canada’s Foreign Affairs Department have promoted the ‘monitoring’ of Independent Jewish Voices events that are critical of the Jewish National Fund. Interviewed June 26 by Jane Bouey.

Music: Mbogeni Ngema (“Lizobuya”), Céu (“Streets Bloom”), Beaatz (“Broken Promises”), E.A.S.Y. Youth feat: Adrian Starblanket (“Life Ain’t Easy”).

 

THIS WEEK’S TOP NEWS HEADLINES

  • TOP STORY: USA: OBAMA CLIMATE SPEECH — US President Barack Obama has unveiled his plan to combat global climate change. Obama gave a major climate change speech this week, saying that U.S. approval of TransCanada’s Keystone XL pipeline will depend on its net contribution to global warming (TYEEAL JAZEERA).
  • CALGARY: FLOODS & CLIMATE CHANGE — Five tanker cars full of flammable petroleum are perched on a cracked and sinking bridge over the Bow River in Calgary, the city’s acting fire chief says. In Calgary, entire neighbourhoods in the city were shut down on Friday, June 21, after days of heavy rain across southern Alberta (CP).

  • TORONTO: MAYOR FORD STAFFER SUSPENDED — One of the men tied to a scandal that includes allegations Toronto Mayor Rob Ford used crack cocaine has pleaded guilty to manslaughter, and struck a deal to avoid going to trial. Meanwhile, Ford suspended family friend Dave Price as his director of operations and logistics after Price anonymously called a Toronto Sun reporter to complain about a headline on a story about him and refused to identify himself. The headline was on an article that identified Price — a longtime family friend and the mayor’s former football coach — as “Dave,” a frequent supportive caller to the mayor’s weekly Newstalk 1010 radio show before he joined the mayor’s staff in early April (CBCTORONTO STAR).

  • BC/ALBERTA: PIPELINE SPILLS — Kinder Morgan has shut down the Trans Mountain pipeline for the second time this month — this time, while the company is gearing up for a public meeting on a possible expansion. The spill comes as Enbridge Inc, Canada’s largest pipeline operator, said on Wednesday it has reopened its 600,000 barrel per day Waupisoo pipeline after a closing it on Saturday following a 90,000 litre oil spill at a nearby line (CBC).
  • VANCOUVER: TRAFFICKING CONVICTION — A B.C. Supreme Court jury found a Vancouver man guilty of human trafficking last night, reportedly a first in Canada. Franco Yiu Kwan Orr was also found guilty of employing a foreign national, specifically his Filipinio nanny Leticia Sarmiento, who testified she was forced to work 16-hour days, seven days a week and also clean the house (VANCOUVER SUN).
  • NEW BRUNSWICK: FRACKING PROTEST — Unspecified “industrial equipment” was torched early Tuesday morning near the area of an ongoing anti-fracking protest in northern New Brunswick, says the RCMP, as tensions continue to rise as a result of ongoing police action against demonstrators there. The scene of the fire sits several kilometres from the site of an ongoing protest against fracking led by people from the Mi’kmaq community of Elsipogtog First Nation. Over 30 people have been arrested, including elders and youth (APTN).
  • CANADA: SENATORS BLOCK UNION BILL — Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s office has issued a stern warning to Conservative senators who helped gut a controversial bill that would force unions to publicly disclose details of their spending (POSTMEDIA).

  • CANADA: FOREIGN WORKER STATS — It’s a surprising dilemma for a country that has 1.4 million jobless people out of a total eligible workforce of 18 million. As the Canadian Press reports, the new figures were released yesterday by Statistics Canada as part of the latest release of data from the National Household Survey, formerly the long-form census (CP).

  • HAMILTON: ENBRIDGE LINE 9 PROTESTS — In Hamilton, Ontario yesterday morning police entered a protest camp dubbed “Swamp Line 9″ and rapidly began making arrests. According to the Media Co-op, Protesters had occupied the site since Thursday, June 20, in order to block construction at an Enbridge Facility in Hamilton that will be crucial in a plan by the company to pump oil from Sarnia to Montreal (MEDIA COOP).

  • USA: VOTING RIGHTS ACT GUTTED — In a major blow for voting rights, the U.S. Supreme Court has invalidated an integral part of the landmark 1965 Voting Rights Act, the crowning achievement of the 1960s civil rights movement (DEMOCRACY NOW).

  • USA: ABORTION FILIBUSTER & 500th EXECUTION — Only a day after Texas Democrat Wendy Davis’ 11-hour  filibuster halted a Republican bill to close almost all the state’s abortion clinics — arguing that unborn fetuses are killed by the medical procedure — the most-prolific death penalty state in the US executed its 500th inmate on yesterday as protesters gathered outside the penitentiary walls to rally against a grim landmark in America’s capital punishment history (GUARDIAN).

  • USA: WHISTLEBLOWER SNOWDEN — A former US spy agency contractor facing charges of espionage remains in hiding at a Moscow airport for a fifth day, while US politicians issue strong warnings to cut ties if Ecuador takes him in (AL JAZEERA).

  • BRAZIL: PROTESTS — Brazilian protesters and police have clashed near a stadium hosting a Confederations Cup soccer match, with police using tear gas and rubber coated steel bullets to disperse thousands of demonstrators. Elsewhere in Brazil the situation was mostly calm, in part because Brazil’s congress shelved legislation that would have limited the power of federal prosecutors to investigate crimes such as political corruption. It was a target of nationwide protests (AL JAZEERA).

  • SOUTH AFRICA: NELSON MANDELA HEALTH — Former South African President Nelson Mandela is still clinging to life, his eldest daughter Makaziwe said on Thursday, but she criticised foreign media “vultures” for violating his privacy as he lay critically ill in hospital. Makaziwe’s outburst came as anxiety increased over the faltering health of the frail 94-year-old anti-apartheid hero, admired across the world as a symbol of resistance against injustice and of racial reconciliation (WASHINGTON POST).

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