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| February 25, 2014
Columnists

Canadians pay, corporations profit: The business of corporate assistance

Photo: Joris Louwes/Flickr

Those who follow the business press closely, and listen attentively to corporate economic commentators, are still mainly in the dark about "who is actually getting what" in the business world.

Some very interesting information does turns up. A current New York Times series entitled "The United States of Subsidies," covers business subsidies handed out by U.S. local governments. It cost $80 billion to attract and keep companies in local communities, the NYT estimated.

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| November 27, 2012
Nexen building in Calgary. Photo: James Bremner/Flickr
| July 25, 2012
Photo: Just a Prairie Boy/Flickr
| July 17, 2012
| March 23, 2012
Columnists

A national 'Buy Canadian' strategy for resource developments

How refreshing it was to open Monday's Globe and Mail and actually see good news from the Canadian manufacturing heartland. Greg Keenan reported on the expansion of Hitachi's factory in Guelph, Ont., that makes enormous trucks for mining operations; the plant is doubling output and employment.

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| October 24, 2011
Columnists

What CETA would mean for Canada's auto industry

Canadian free trade negotiators are going all-out to get a deal with the EU on a new free trade agreement. The Harper government wants a deal badly for largely symbolic and ideological purposes, to show that the free trade agenda is back on track under this "stable majority government." Many valid concerns have been raised about the implications of a deal on pharmaceutical costs, on public procurement, and more. What would a Canada-EU deal mean for the auto industry? Here are a few summary points:

- Canada's auto industry would be especially hard hit by a free trade deal with Europe.

- Europe sells billions of dollars of auto products in Canada, but buys virtually nothing back from the Canadian auto industry.

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Columnists

Canada's challenges in natural resource development

Natural resources are increasingly central to Canada's economic trajectory. Our challenge is to maximize the positive spinoffs from resource developments, while minimizing the economic and environmental costs. In that regard, imagine two extreme cases: one in which resource projects generate diversified and lasting benefits, and one in which they do not.

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