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Migrants in Atlantic Canada: How to survive in a remittance economy

Photo: Flickr/undergroundbastard

There was a lot of ire and eye-rolling on March 7 when New Brunswick Conservative MP John Williamson, in response to a question about labour shortages in meat-packing and processing, claimed: "it makes no sense to pay whities to stay home w

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| March 24, 2015
| March 19, 2015
Photo: kristy/flickr
| March 16, 2015
Columnists

Riding the roller-coaster: What lower oil prices mean for Canada's economy

Photo: elston/flickr

Introduction

Canada's economy has been thrown into turmoil by the dramatic decline in oil prices over the last six months. World crude prices have plunged by half: from around $100 (US) per barrel in summer 2014, to around $50 today (see Figure 1). Worse yet, Canada's oil output receives an even lower price: our unprocessed heavy oil exports sell for only about $35 per barrel in the U.S. market (because of its lower quality and a regional supply glut).

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March 4, 2015 |
From 1980–2005, average household income in the poorest 10 per cent of neighbourhoods increased by only two per cent compared to incomes in the richest 10 per cent of neighbourhoods that rose by 80.
Columnists

Confusing 'deficit elimination' with 'prosperity' -- and B.C.'s fading glory

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| February 17, 2015
February 16, 2015 |
Canadians can expect to pay more for the price of food this year, largely due to the falling value of the Canadian loonie against the U.S. dollar.
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