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New thinking needed on Bank of Canada's approach to monetary policy

Photo: d.neuman/flickr

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Every five years the federal finance minister updates the "marching orders" that guide the Bank of Canada and its conduct of monetary policy. This process is the one opportunity for democratic oversight of the Bank, which otherwise is deemed to be operating "independently" of government -- all the better to ensure that it has the authority to take away the punchbowl whenever the economic party gets going too energetically.

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Columnists

Is slow 'growth' inevitable? A progressive response to sustained stagnation

Photo: Yasmeen/flickr

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Most of the world economy (including Canada's) has performed sluggishly since the Global Financial Crisis of 2008-09. And many economic and fiscal projections now accept this pattern of slow growth as more or less inevitable, as a "new normal." This argument is typically invoked to justify a ratcheting down of expectations regarding job prospects, incomes and public services.

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| July 18, 2016
Photo: Council of Canadians
| June 17, 2016
Photo: flickr/Ken Teegardin
| June 1, 2016
Columnists

Canadians need more than celebrity from Justin Trudeau

Photo: World Bank Photo Collection/flickr

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It was a night for nostalgia, the eighth and last White House Correspondents Dinner for U.S. President Barack Obama. The one-time Harvard Law Review editor and community organizer, a basketball-savvy president with worldwide appeal, was doing his final stand-up before the audience of media, political and Hollywood stars.

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Columnists

Signing trade deals does not amount to promoting trade

Photo: Chambre des Députés/flickr

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Columnists

Comparing fiscal federalism and revenue distribution in Canada and Australia

Photo: Nicki Mannix/flickr

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Columnists

As oil deflates Alberta's swagger, it's time to face some harmful economic myths

Photo: Jeff Wallace/flickr

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Now that the "swagger" is gone out of Alberta, as the news reports say, and Albertans are getting on pogey as the oil economy has collapsed, you'd think we'd at least be spared the lectures about how economically virtuous Albertans are as compared to us bedraggled Maritimers.

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Photo: Sara Long/flickr
| March 31, 2016
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