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The economy excuse that tears at Canada

NDP leader Jack Layton during the filibuster against back-to-work legislation being imposed on postal workers.
The NDP's parliamentary debate instigated last weekend leads to a wider debate. Whose economy is it? What is the economy for? How do we improve economic well-being? Conservatives want to avoid this.

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Columnists

What deflation will do to Canada

Where is the Canadian economy headed? The federal finance minister is on the road doing his pre-budget consultations. Expect Jim Flaherty to return with the same complacent views he proclaimed when he left Ottawa; the wording was drawn up for him months ago by the Prime Minister's Office. It reads: the recovery is on track and it is time to cut government spending.

The Harper script for the economy is all about politics and ideology. Liberals want to tax and spend. You can entrust your future to Stephen Harper; unlike Layton and Ignatieff, the Conservative leader will not raise taxes.

Canada and the next world financial crisis

How will the next financial crisis erupt? (Or perhaps we should describe it as a further chapter of the ongoing financial crisis.) It's like figuring out which piece of tinder will ignite after a sizzling heat wave. We know it's bad out there, but just where will the next spark hit? What follows is one of many- potential financial crisis scenarios that Canada could face.

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Columnists

Ten points in Canada's real economic update

The minister of finance has made his Fall Economic Update. We wanted to hear what he had to say about government spending -- but we didn't. Why? Because the real story is one of austerity.

The federal finance minister promised Canadians a look at what is happening with the economy. On the surface, the job is fairly straightforward. James Flaherty has to say whether the economy is growing, or not; and he has to say what he intends to do about it.

What are the game changers?

For those involved in social change work, these days can be frustrating ones. Just as the neoliberal order of tax cuts, deregulation, resource extraction and free trade seems to be maxed out, like the Energizer bunny it keeps coming back. Meanwhile, progressive forces (academics, unions, NGOs and political parties) can give a good fight from time to time, but overall are as fragmented as ever.

So how do we move ahead to create a movement for change that will excite people about the world that could be, and put our ruling class on the defensive? For starters, we need to better focus our energies on articulating a vision and some clear highly strategic "game changing" steps towards that vision.

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Filmmaker Claudia Medina on 'Life After Growth'

Filmmaker Claudia Medina on 'Life After Growth'
The filmmaker talks about the state of the world economy and the value of the movement towards de-growth in the world.

Related rabble.ca story:

October 23, 2014 |
PBO analysis confirms: legislative changes to EI are hurting workers and economies in many communities in Canada.

Canada's billionaires: Did you hear about the Irvings?

Irving vs. Irving: Canada's Feuding Billionaires and the Stories they won't tell

by Jacques Poitras
(Viking Canada,
2014;
$15.99)

In this review of Irving vs. Irving: Canada's Feuding Billionaires and the Stories they won't tell, Canada's third wealthiest family -- who have a monopoly on New Brunswick’s English-language print media and billions of dollars in offshore accounts -- is examined against the backdrop of their history and relationships and their newspaper operations. Read on!

To think about the media landscape in New Brunswick, and the economy and politics more generally, one must come to terms with the power of the Irving family.

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The Canada-Honduras trade agreement: A stain on Canada

Photo: media coop

On October 1, 2014, Canada legally implemented a Free Trade Agreement with Honduras.

The Conservative government was joined in the House of Commons by the Liberal Party in supporting this measure. The NDP was the only official party in Parliament to oppose it.

In keeping with our long-standing approach, New Democrats oppose signing trade agreements with countries who commit widespread human rights abuses, practice anti-democratic behaviour and foster political violence. We believe that nations who do so should not be rewarded with preferential economic benefits. Rather, they should be required to demonstrate a commitment to meet international norms and make progress toward them as a pre-condition to receiving such advantages.

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October 20, 2014 |
The decision to hand over government printing contracts to for-profit businesses could jeopardize privacy and end up costing more.
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