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Over 400,000 went on strike Dec. 9 in historic labour action in Quebec

Photo: Travailleuses et travailleurs du secteur public

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A historically high number of public service employees were on strike and protesting in Quebec on Wednesday Dec. 9. Unresolved contract negotiations with the government were the flashpoint leading to the day's unrest. 

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Quebec public sector unions plan strike for Dec. 9, government barely budging

Photo: flickr/Confédération des syndicats nationaux

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Quebec public service unions have been in contract negotiations with the government for nearly a year. Last month the Quebec Liberal government, which had proudly not given an inch so far in negotiations, budged in November. 

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November 5, 2015 |
The $3 million loan from Third Eye Capital to the uranium promotion company Strateco to finance its $190 million lawsuit against the Quebec government is cause for concern.

Labour actions escalate in Quebec over stalled negotiations

Photo: Association pour une Solidarité Syndicale Étudiante ( ASSÉ ) facebook gro

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Hundreds of thousands of public employees are on one-day strikes this week. They're protesting stalled labour negotiations.

Collective contracts expired on April 1 of this year. The Quebec Liberal government has been refusing to budge, as has been the case with its cuts to many services, notably health care and education.

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Columnists

From Marois to Harper, niqab debate plays with xenophobic fire

Photo: pmwebphotos/flickr

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The election is coming to an end. All the way, I resisted the urge to write about the niqab. Why? I didn't want to create more controversy and stir the already ugly pot simmering in many people's minds. But then, it became stronger than me. My brain isn't as disciplined as my fingers so I found myself typing out thoughts about the niqab.

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Votes count here: Tight race forms between NDP and Liberals in Hull-Aylmer

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The debate English Canada needs, but probably won't get

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Journalists and pundits had speculated that last night's first French-language leaders debate would be a Tom Mulcair pile on.

It wasn't.

The five leaders took to the stage at CBC/Radio-Canada in Montreal, each with their varying proficiencies of the French language, and tried to convince French-speakers (read: Québecers) that their party deserved our votes.

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Eye on Quebec: Leaders' debate in French on Thursday in Montreal

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The next stop on the federal election campaign trail is Montreal, Quebec for a leaders' debate in French this Thursday, Sept. 24. Quebec holds a substantial 78 of the overall 338 seats up for grabs in the House of Commons. 

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Photo: flickr/ Canada 2020
| September 2, 2015

Powerful reflections on the Oka Crisis at Red Post Art Exhibit

Photo: Onehkwéntara Kanehtsóte - the Red Post Art Exhibit facebook page

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Onekwenhtara Kanehtsote - the Red Post Art Exhibit, curated by Katsi'tsakwas Ellen Gabriel of Kanehsatà:ke and Jolene Rickard of Tuscarora, commemorates the 25th anniversary of the Crisis of 1990, also known as the Oka Crisis, by demonstrating its impacts through art.

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