Mohamed HarkatSyndicate content

Photo: Blackfish
| June 27, 2014
Columnists

Productive week for Canada's desk torturers in Harkat, Diab cases

Photo: Mike Gifford/flickr

Two judicial decisions released last week remind us that the concept of national security is incompatible with democracy: the former almost always trumps the latter, and various enemies-du-jour are regularly created and then served up on the altar of "security." In each instance, profoundly disturbing decisions were dealt to Mohamed Harkat, facing deportation to torture in Algeria based on secret hearsay, and Hassan Diab, facing extradition to France on clearly trumped up allegations likely gleaned from torture.

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photo: Secret Trial 5
| April 25, 2014
Columnists

Supreme Court's secret hearing and Judge Nadon's Charter dismissal

Photo: wyliepoon/flickr

Just before Thanksgiving, the Supreme Court of Canada held two days of hearings regarding the fate of Mohamed Harkat, detained in prison and under house arrest for over a decade by a secret trial security certificate, the reasons for which he has never been allowed to know and challenge. October 10 was a public hearing that he could attend, while October 11 was one he was not invited to, nor were his lawyers, the media, or the public. In fact, the eight judges of the Supreme Court disappeared to hold a secret hearing somewhere in Canada.

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Supreme Court of Canada. Photo: Mike Alexander/flickr
| October 10, 2013
Redeye

Supreme Court to hold secret hearing on Harkat case

September 27, 2013
| On October 11, the judges of the Supreme Court of Canada will meet in a secret location to hear evidence against Mohamed Harkat, first arrested under a security certificate in 2002.
Length: 12:54 minutes (11.82 MB)
Columnists

Canada's burning chambers: A secret Supreme Court hearing in October

Supreme Court of Canada. Photo: Mike Alexander/flickr

On October 11, as many Canadians focus on the best place to purchase a Thanksgiving turkey, the Supreme Court of Canada will be in session, but anyone wishing to attend that day's hearing will find the Court building empty, and the nine judges missing. Outside of a small handful of individuals, no one will know where the country's highest court will be sitting or what will be discussed.

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Columnists

Bureaucrats find secret trial process 'too protective of rights'

Image: Jared Rodriguez / t r u t h o u t/flickr

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The end of June marks 13 years of Mohammad Mahjoub's Kafkasesque journey. The Egyptian refugee and returnee from torture originally thought he was walking onto a Hollywood set when he was surrounded by heavily armed men and arrested while getting off a Toronto streetcar in 2000.

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Columnists

Harkats head back to Supreme Court after 10 years of secret trial nightmare

Mohamed and Sophie Harkat. Photo courtesy of Sophie Harkat.

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Most couples sitting in courtrooms are there for separation and divorce proceedings. Not so Sophie and Mohamed (Moe) Harkat, who have spent years in court because they desperately wish to stay together. The Ottawa couple have spent the past decade resisting with all their might the attempt to make their marriage a threesome by a secretive party who, in a manner that most relationship counsellors would mark as a major red flag moment, refuses to be open and honest, all the while it questions the authenticity of the Harkats' love for one another.

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Canada's secret trials, immigration policy under fire on Human Rights Day

Vigil in Vancouver. (Photo: David P. Ball)

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Organizers in at least eight cities across the country are rallying support for Canadian Muslims rounded up in the so-called War on Terror -- particularly the ongoing punishment without trial of three men under security certificates.

The events, which kicked off last night with a candlelight vigil in Vancouver, include what is billed as a "family-friendly noise demonstration" in front of Montreal's Laval Immigration Prevention Centre today, as well as events in Toronto, Calgary, Saskatoon, Ottawa, and Halifax. 

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