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Is slow 'growth' inevitable? A progressive response to sustained stagnation

Photo: Yasmeen/flickr

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Most of the world economy (including Canada's) has performed sluggishly since the Global Financial Crisis of 2008-09. And many economic and fiscal projections now accept this pattern of slow growth as more or less inevitable, as a "new normal." This argument is typically invoked to justify a ratcheting down of expectations regarding job prospects, incomes and public services.

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Alberta NDP sticks to its guns

Photo provided by David Climenhaga
Alberta Premier rejects "immediate, massive, reckless cuts" proposed by the opposition and vows to stay the course on her government’s chosen role as economic shock absorber.

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Columnists

Progress and the battle of economic ideas in election 2015

Photo: Matt Boulton/flickr

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Photo: KMR Photography/flickr
| September 22, 2015
Columnists

To fight shock doctrine, progressives need to learn critical economics

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Photo: IMF headquarters. Credit: @mjb/flickr
| June 9, 2015
Photo: Tiffany Bailey/flickr
| December 17, 2014
| November 20, 2014
| November 14, 2014
Columnists

Study finds no link between minimum wage levels and employment outcomes

Photo: Russ Allison Loar/flickr

Last week my Unifor colleague Jordan Brennan and I published a study through the CCPA Ontario office examining the historical empirical evidence regarding the link between changes in minimum wages and employment outcomes. We find there is no robust evidence in Canadian historical data that increases in real minimum wages cause either lower employment or higher unemployment, even when we focus on key segments of the labour market that are most reliant on low-wage labour (including youth and the retail and hospitality sectors).

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