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Trump's proven that free trade deals can be rewritten. So let's write better ones.

Photo: Billie Greenwood/flickr

For years, we've been told the dictates of globalization, and the intrusive and prescriptive terms of free trade agreements in particular, are immutable, natural, and unquestionable. When workers were displaced by the migration of multinational capital toward more profitable jurisdictions, we were told there's nothing we can do about it except join the race to the bottom in a desperate attempt to hang onto our jobs. When investment and employment were undermined by lopsided trade and capital flows, and employers and financiers utilized the leverage afforded them by unrestrained international mobility to ratchet the distributional structure of the economy ever-more-blatantly in their own favour, we were informed this was just the logic of markets. And anyone who questioned

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Columnists

Is slow 'growth' inevitable? A progressive response to sustained stagnation

Photo: Yasmeen/flickr

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Most of the world economy (including Canada's) has performed sluggishly since the Global Financial Crisis of 2008-09. And many economic and fiscal projections now accept this pattern of slow growth as more or less inevitable, as a "new normal." This argument is typically invoked to justify a ratcheting down of expectations regarding job prospects, incomes and public services.

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Alberta NDP sticks to its guns

Photo provided by David Climenhaga
Alberta Premier rejects "immediate, massive, reckless cuts" proposed by the opposition and vows to stay the course on her government’s chosen role as economic shock absorber.

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Columnists

Progress and the battle of economic ideas in election 2015

Photo: Matt Boulton/flickr

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Photo: KMR Photography/flickr
| September 22, 2015
Columnists

To fight shock doctrine, progressives need to learn critical economics

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Photo: IMF headquarters. Credit: @mjb/flickr
| June 9, 2015
Photo: Tiffany Bailey/flickr
| December 17, 2014
| November 20, 2014
| November 14, 2014
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