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Death of a Princess revisited

Antony Thomas. Photo: Kempton/flickr

Last week, very wisely, the New York premiere of the film The Interview was cancelled. This week, Sony Pictures cancelled the release of the film, then changed its mind and announced it will release it on Christmas Day.

Am I the only one to find an air of déjà vu in the North Korean-The Interview affair? Has everyone forgotten, or are they too young to remember, that in 1980, the British film Death of a Princess, by Antony Thomas and Gladys Ganley, provoked similar responses on the part of Saudi Arabia?

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UP! Empowering communities from the bottom up

Image: rabble.ca

The September 2014 New Brunswick election was not just an election. It was a referendum on shale gas and unconventional hydraulic fracking. 

The Conservative party tried to convince voters that the development of shale gas is New Brunswick's only hope to create jobs and stop the exodus of young workers out west. But, most voters did not buy into this narrow one-sided view. Citizens elected a Liberal majority government on the promise of an immediate moratorium on fracking and David Coon, leader of the Green Party, became the first elected Green MLA in Canadian history. 

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Harper et Couillard: un cocktail dangereux pour le Québec

Photo: CSN/refusons.org  Raynald Leblanc

Au bout du compte, le Québec est indiscutablement une composante essentielle de cette grande Confédération canadienne. Personne n'en doutera, bien sûr, d'autant que ces jours-ci, la question nationale n'est pas vraiment au cœur des discussions dans les chaumières.

Mais à voir les efforts déployés par le tandem Harper-Couillard pour faire transiter le pétrole sale des sables bitumineux de l'Ouest par le Québec, il est à se demander si nous ne renouons pas avec l'origine de la fondation du Canada, alors que la construction du chemin de fer avait relié toutes les colonies britanniques, pour le plus grand bien des capitalistes anglais.

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Harper and Couillard: A dangerous combo for Quebec

Photo: CSN/refusons.org  Raynald Leblanc

Pour lire en français.

Quebec is indisputably an essential component in Canadian confederation. Of course, no one doubts this, especially since the national question is hardly a hot topic of discussion around the dinner table these days.

But to see Harper and Couillard’s efforts to have dirty oil shipped from Western Canada’s oil sands through Quebec, we have to wonder if we aren’t returning to Canada’s origins, with the building of the railroad to connect the British colonies for the benefit of English capitalists.

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The 2014 G20 summit: What did it achieve?

Photo: flickr/john

Brisbane – Walking around Brisbane today after the G20 Leaders’ Summit, there is little physical evidence that the meeting ever took place.  The security barriers have gone, the banners taken down, and everyone is back at work after enjoying an extra public holiday.  But what about the decisions taken by the G20 leaders last weekend?  Will their impacts be just as transitory?

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G20 must turn the tide on rising inequality and tackle the Ebola crisis

Photo: flickr/john

Brisbane -- G20 Leaders who met in Brisbane, Australia on the 15 and 16 of November need to focus on the real issues that matter for the world. This means they need to tackle rising inequality head-on or risk leaving millions of people trapped in poverty. They also need to ensure they are all doing their fair share to tackle the Ebola crisis.

The G20 brings together the world's major advanced and emerging economies, represents 90 per cent of global GDP, 80 per cent of global trade and two-thirds of the world's population. It's a powerful group, and its efforts to boost growth and fix the global tax system are important and needed.

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Women take action for institutional change in Vancouver city elections

Photo: Hot Pink Paper Campaign

We're talking about it -- we've been talking about it for years, in fact. The difference is that not so many people were listening before.

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Group work is key to getting government action on climate change

Photo: Flickr/Takver

Canada’s dismal record on fighting climate change was brought into the spotlight twice this week -- first with a crucial UN report spelling out the tough task ahead for the world’s nations, and second, with the president of France delivering an embarrassing lecture to the Harper government in our own Parliament.

Practically tongue in cheek, French President Francois Hollande, glancing at Prime Minister Stephen Harper, told Parliament on Monday that he had no reason to doubt Canada’s commitment to reaching a global agreement on climate change when the final round of negotiations are held in Paris in December 2015.

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Sexual assault in progressive spaces: Thinking about the Jian Ghomeshi allegations

Photo: Flickr/Linh Do

Editor's note: Since this piece was submitted to rabble.caNavigator and Rock-it PR have ended their work with Jian Ghomeshi, and more women have come forward with allegations of sexual assault.

[Content Warning: Sexual Assault, Violence Against Women, Rape]

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Toronto election results reveal a polarized city

Photo: flickr/Martin Cathrae

Are we fed up yet? Between a seemingly interminable campaign season and a record 64 per cent voter turnout, election-weary Torontonians might be forgiven for being a bit bleary-eyed in the days following, while the reality of an end to the Ford era sinks. But what have we woken up to?

We've woken up to the disappointing reality of a polarized city that is the mirror image of those neighbourhoods that are plagued by social inequity. And the blame for this doesn't necessarily fall entirely on every downtown voter's favourite punching bag -- the Ford brothers.

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