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Why copyright trolling in Canada doesn't make sense

Photo: flickr/zoovroo

The Canadian media featured extensive coverage over the weekend of the federal court decision that opens the door to TekSavvy disclosing the names and addresses of thousands of subscribers and establishes new safeguards against copyright trolling in Canada.

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Why we need to rethink Black History Month

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I am frustrated with Black History Month (Mois de l'histoire des Noirs) this year. I feel overwhelmed by the newspaper features, TV specials, artworks and concerts in "celebration" of black history. And, as a black woman of Jamaican parentage, and a scholar of Canadian history, I find myself questioning the direction Black History Month is going. Even though it is recognized on a national level, it has remained a series of local events and remembrances, and I'm wondering, how did we get here and is it time to rethink Black History Month?

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Black History Month from Negro History Week to African Liberation Month

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"Who owns history? Not even the ones who made it." Kumasi, Black August Organizing Committee

Black History Month must be updated for the 21st century. February should be the month that we re-double our struggle against imperialism and white supremacy, and for reparations for slavery, the slave trade and colonialism.

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What Canadians can do to fight back against Internet surveillance

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Over the past eight months, the steady stream of Snowden leaks have revealed the existence of a massive surveillance infrastructure intent on capturing seemingly all communications, including metadata on phone calls, Internet searches and other online activity. While much of the surveillance originates with the U.S. NSA, the leaks suggest that Canada plays a key role in many initiatives and that Canadians' data is undoubtedly captured in the process. Indeed, in recent months, we've learned about:

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Jason Kenney: Up the SodaStream without a paddle?

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SodaStream, the now infamous maker of soda machines, has found itself a new brand ambassador. Perhaps not as affable as Scarlet Johansson, Minister Jason Kenney has seemingly volunteered to be the new face of the company. He publicly intervened in the ongoing debacle between charity Oxfam and SodaStream by staging a "buycott" in support of the corporation. This outrageous gesture by a public official is appalling and antithetical to Canada's foreign policy; it serves as a tacit approval of Israel's illegal settlement enterprise.

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Egypt's new dictatorship model for the digital age

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Egypt was ruled by the Mubarak dictatorship for 30 years before the people managed to overthrow him in 2011.

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Hey telecom companies: Stop the secrecy and come clean!

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Last week I joined leading civil liberties groups and academics in a public letter sent to Canada's leading telecom companies asking them to shed new light into their data retention and sharing policies. The letter writing initiative, led by Christopher Parsons of the Citizen Lab at the University of Toronto's Munk School of Global Affairs, is the latest attempt to address the lack of transparency regarding how and when Canadians' personal information may be disclosed without their knowledge to law enforcement or intelligence agencies.

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