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In conversation with author Doretta Lau

Photo: flickr/Florin Gorgan
Yutaka Dirks interviews author Doretta Lau and reviews her debut collection of short stories 'How Does A Single Blade of Grass Thank the Sun?'

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Doretta Lau sets a new standard in Canadian literature

How Does A Single Blade of Grass Thank the Sun?

by Doretta Lau
(Nightwood Editions,
2014;
$19.95)

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'El Niño' draws attention to the issues of migrant labour

El Niño

by Nadia Bozak
(House of Anansi,
2014;
$22.95)

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Nadia Bozak's El Niño begins how it ends: with portents of death under a blazing desert sun.

We first meet Baez, the coyote-dog hybrid creature who, in smelling her own demise, ties together the parallel timelines of Bozak's novel: one in the present day and the second two years before, each playing out against the harsh landscape of the Oro Desert.

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'Jewel of the Thames' dives into the mythos of Sherlock Holmes

Jewel of the Thames

by Angela Misri
(Fierce Ink Press,
2014;
$16.99)

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Do you have a young reader at home who craves an Arthur Conan Doyle style mystery story? Heck! Do you like young adult fiction with a strong female protagonist yourself?

Well, you need to read Jewel of the Thames by Angela Misri, which presents Portia Adams, a quick-witted young woman who inherits the legendary dectective Sherlock Holmes' dectective agency, and soon finds herself dreaming of solving crimes.

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Photo: flickr/snow0810
| March 6, 2014

Gangland, girls and glory: 'Anatomy of a Girl Gang' searches for a sense of belonging

Anatomy of a Girl Gang

by Ashley Little
(Arsenal Pulp Press,
2013;
$16.95)

Ashley Little’s Anatomy of a Girl Gang is like an after-school special gone horribly awry -- and that’s a good thing.

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| November 21, 2013

Women in CanLit rise to the top and elevate literary arts and discussion on gender equality

photo: wikimedia commons

Last week, writer Lynn Coady received Canada’s most prestigious literary honour, the Giller Prize, for her short story collection Hellgoing, cementing that 2013 is not only the year of the short story, but also the year of the female writer in mainstream literature.

Coady’s win came less than a month after one of her mentors, Alice Munro, became the first Canadian woman to win the Nobel Prize in Literature, and only the 13th woman since the prize was first awarded in 1901.

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The importance of Montreal's Black Power movement: An interview with David Austin

Photo courtesy of Stefan Christoff
Stefan Christoff interviews author David Austin about his new book 'Fear of a Black Nation: Race, Sex and Security in Sixties Montreal' and the importance of the Black Power movement in Canada.

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