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128 km later: How to hold on after your life doesn't make sense

The Walking Man

by Paul Dore
(Iguana Books,
2015;
$19.99)

"Lemme just get this out of the goddam way; I'm nervous as all hell. Nervous because you may or may not relate to the mess that follows."

This is how Paul Dore's debut novel, The Walking Man, opens: an intimate conversation with the narrator, our unnamed protagonist. A bundle of nerves, the character spills out his anxieties, struggles with depression, fears of opening up to people, of never finding love.

This book is that over-sharing friend we all have, and yet readers should not be intimidated or scared off by its candidness.

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How can we make Canada's roads safer?

No Accident: Eliminating Injury and Death on Canadian Roads

by Neil Arason
(Wilfrid Laurier University Press,
2014;
$29.99)

Is it possible to eliminate death and serious injury from Canada's roads? No Accident: Eliminating Injury and Death on Canadian Roads author Neil Arason definitely thinks so.

No Accident urges Canadians to prioritize road safety as a national priority and provides a roadmap that will guide us to a safer future. Arason weaves together topics from public transit and cyclists to human-related errors to road engineering to collision-avoidance technologies to provide a well-rounded and timely study of Canadian roads.

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Sex, drugs and pyromania: 'The Green Hotel' exposes Toronto's underbelly

The Green Hotel

by Jesse Gilmour
(Quattro Books,
2014;
$18.00)

First time author, Jesse Gilmour was introduced to the Canadian arts scene as a subject of a book instead of as a writer. His father, the infamous David Gilmour, wrote the memoir The Film Club, which talks about their relationship around the time when Jesse dropped out of high school.

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Transformative movement-building: Another politics made clear

Another Politics: Talking Across Today's Transformative Movements

by Chris Dixon
(University of California Press,
2014;
$27.95)

With such widespread challenges and injustice facing our society, combined with the shifting energies and momentum of people power, the 'another politics' Chris Dixon documents in Another Politics: Talking Across Today's Transformative Movements offers perhaps the most promising and exciting approaches to collectively addressing these problems while simultaneously moving us into the world in which we wish to

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| March 18, 2015
| March 16, 2015
| March 13, 2015

The limits and possibilities of dissent in an age of militarized policing

Crisis and Control: The Militarization of Protest Policing

by Lesley J. Wood
(Between the Lines,
2014;
$26.96)

It's hard not to admire Lesley J. Wood. She is an associate professor of sociology at York University, an activist in the anti-poverty and global justice movements and a thoughtful writer.

For instance, instead of dismissing the sometimes brutal behaviours of enforcement officers during the G20 summit with an aggrieved insult or a rude gesture and letting it go at that, she put herself in their shoes, imagining herself "a police commander whose job and legitimacy depended on effectively maintaining the status quo." 

Why? Wood wanted to get beyond simplistic explanations that posit police as demons in order to build the capacity of movements and resist state repression and corporate domination.

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Textile artists reclaim narrative through 'Strange Material'

Strange Material: Storytelling through Textiles

by Leanne Prain
(Arsenal Pulp Press,
2014;
$24.95)

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From old Blockbuster video receipts to embroidered pillows to crocheted fabric squares, Strange Material: Storytelling through Textiles by Leanne Prain showcases artists who work with textiles you'd expect to see in a living room, not an art gallery.

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'Nothing Looks Familiar' asks: 'What does it mean to live in a body today?'

Nothing Looks Familiar

by Shawn Syms
(Arsenal Pulp Press,
2014;
$15.95)

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"I won't go out with another man on the killing floor," says Wanda, the narrator of 'On the Line,' in the opening line of Shawn Sym's debut collection Nothing Looks Familiar. "I can't stand the smell of them, or their attitudes."

Wanda's potential suitors work with her in a meat-packing plant, and carry the smell of dead flesh on their skin. Her preoccupation with their bodies' scent is understandable. It is also emblematic of the author's thematic concerns.

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