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Image: flickr/bcgovphotos
| July 13, 2015
Ken Boessenkool
| July 13, 2015
Image: Flickr/bcgovphotos
| July 9, 2015
Rachel Notley
| June 23, 2015
Ken Georgetti
| June 8, 2015
Image: Flickr/BCGovPhotos
| May 19, 2015

Kinder Morgan would profit from oil spills. Really.

Kinder Morgan subsidiary Trans Mountain Pipeline (TMP) owns 50.9 per cent of the corporation that would respond to a marine oil spill in British Columbia, according to TMP's response to an information request.

The Western Canadian Marine Response Corporation (WCMRC) has four other shareholders: Imperial Oil, Shell Canada, Chevron and Suncor.

A spill would certainly mean business and revenue for the WCMRC.

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Image: Christy Clark/Facebook
| March 5, 2015

Jobs! Money! Nope! Benefits of LNG exports grossly exaggerated

Photo: flickr/Chris Yakimov

In the 2013 provincial election, Christy Clark's Liberals promised that exporting liquefied natural gas (LNG) to Asia would provide jobs and expand government revenues.

A year and a half later this boom is nowhere to be seen.

Fifteen liquefying plants and pipelines have been promoted. Six were reported to be on the verge of starting construction. But in early October, Petronas -- the company closest to seeking regulatory approval -- announced that it was considering shelving its proposal.

The Malaysian government-owned corporation wanted assurances that provincial and federal taxes and royalties would be kept low and that the company could bring in workers from abroad to construct and operate its facilities.

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Comments

We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

Do

  • Tell the truth and avoid rumours.
  • Add context and background.
  • Report typos and logical fallacies.
  • Be respectful.
  • Respect copyright - link to articles.
  • Stay focused. Bring in-depth commentary to our discussion forum, babble.

Don't

  • Use oppressive/offensive language.
  • Libel or defame.
  • Bully or troll.
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  • Engage trolls. Flag suspect activity instead.
| September 11, 2014
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