Hennessy's Index

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The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternative's Trish Hennessy has long been a fan of Harper Magazine's one-page list of eye-popping statistics, Harper's Index. Instead of wishing for a Canadian version to magically appear, she's created her own index -- a monthly listing of numbers about Canada and its place in the world. Hennessy's Index -- a number is never just a number -- comes out on the first of each month.

Canada vs. the OECD

Hennessey's Index: The monthly listing of numbers about Canada and its place in the world.
Canada and its place in the world.

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A number is never just a number: Equal Pay Day facts

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31

Percentage pay gap between men and women in Ontario in 2011, the most recent year of data available, based on average annual earnings. That's up from a 28 per cent gender pay gap in 2010.

68.5 cents

How much Ontario working women made in 2011 for every man's dollar. That's down from 72 cents in 2010.

$200

Increase in Ontario men's average annual earnings between 2010 and 2011. They earned an average of $49,000 in 2011.

 

$1,400

Decrease in Ontario women's average annual earnings between 2010 and 2011. They earned an average of $33,600 in 2011.

38.5

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A number is never just a number: The skills gap trope

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Number 1

Canada has more workers with post-secondary training than any other industrialized country. More than half of Canadians aged 25-34 have a post-secondary diploma or certificate; 28.9 per cent held a university degree in 2006 -- up from 14.9 per cent in 1981.  (Source and source)

Half

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A number is never just a number: Tax cuts 101

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70 years

The last time Canadian federal tax revenues have been this low (as a share of the economy). (Source)

29%

Top federal personal income tax rate for anyone earning from $136,270 to you name it. In 1981, the rate for anyone earning $119,000 or more (1981 dollars) was 43 per cent. (Source)

$2.5 billion

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A number is never just a number: Benefits of pension income splitting

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2007

The year Canada's federal government extended to senior families the opportunity to partake in extra tax breaks through pension income splitting. (Source: Finance Canada, 2007 Federal Budget, pg 222.)

1 out of 5

Number of Canada's senior families among the richest 10 per cent who receive more than $1,000 in tax breaks from pension income splitting. (Source)

1 out of 1,000

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A number is never just a number: Words to retire in 2014

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Austerity

Government wage freezes, job and spending cuts are adding to the post-recession fiscal drag on Canada's economy. Even the IMF says it was wrong about austerity. Time to put austerity out of our misery. (Source)

Attrition

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A number is never just a number: Year in review

Photo: Michael DancingEagle Cassidy

Editor's note: this column was originally featured on December 2, 2013

January 2

By 1:18 p.m. on this date most workers had just finished lunch on the first working day of the year, but Canada's highest paid 100 CEOs had already pocketed the equivalent of the average wage in Canada, $45,448. BTW: The CCPA's 2013 CEO pay clock is still ticking. (Source)

January 24

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