Tyler Morgenstern

Tyler MorgensternSyndicate content

Tyler Morgenstern is a Vancouver-based writer, activist, and agitator. He is currently serves as spokesperson for Reimagine CBC.

Reimagining CBC during troubled times

The Reimagined CBC logo that participants created at Reimagine CBC's launch social. Photo: Angus Wong
The goal of the Reimagine CBC project is to spark a brainstorm on the future of public media in Canada.

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Tories rebrand 'Government of Canada' in Harper's image

What you see is what you'll get: Whitehorse's David Skelton protests Harper's vision of the Yukon's Federal Building on Tuesday, March 8. Photo: Meagan Perry.
Canada is out and Harper is in as the trending word among chichi Conservatives.

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Rae Spoon's First Spring Grass Fire on finding (queer) time

First Spring Fire

by Rae Spoon
(Arsenal Pulp Press,
2012;
$14.95)

In his remarkable 2009 text, Cruising Utopia, José Esteban Muñoz fixates on the ways in which queer bodies exist outside of and subvert what he calls “straight time.” Straight time, for Muñoz, is what tells queers that “there is no future but the here and now of our everyday life.” It grounds the fragmentation, suppression, and elision of queer histories, and denies futurity to those not counted under the rubric of a “reproductive majoritarian heterosexuality.”

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Hacking the border: Technology, poetics and protest in the work of Ricardo Dominguez

Ricardo Dominguez (center), with Electronic Disturbance Theater 2.0.

It's a staging that feels, if not inappropriate, then at least a little unconventional: I'm seated in front of my laptop in the living room of my East Vancouver home, trying (and mostly failing) to ward off the September cold creeping up through the floorboards. On my screen, streamed in from a home office in San Diego, California, is Ricardo Dominguez, one of North America's most wildly experimental and most deeply politicized media artists.

My microphone malfunctions, my Internet connection wavers, and my flimsy earbuds crackle. But all the same, Dominguez' cavernous baritone vibrates across the pixelated static that separates us, asserting his "presence" with a startling authority.

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Reimagine CBC: Canadians come together to think big in troubled times

Reilly Yeo, a member of the Reimagine CBC team, holds the Reimagined CBC logo that participants created at the Reimagine launch. Photo: Angus Wong

In late January, a small team gleaned from the ranks of Vancouver-based citizens' organizations OpenMedia.ca and Leadnow.ca took the wraps off an exciting new project called Reimagine CBC. The goal was simple, but ambitious: to spark a massive brainstorm on the future of public media in Canada by asking Canadians how the CBC, as a public broadcaster, could be reimagined as a leader in participatory, innovative and engaging media production.

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Government of the Harper, by the Harper, for the Harper

What you see is what you'll get: Whitehorse's David Skelton protests Harper's vision of the Yukon's Federal Building on Tuesday, March 8. Photo: Meagan Perry.

The Toronto Star reported that the federal Tories have officially rebranded "The Government of Canada" as the "Harper Government." While the shift is not universal, with the Vancouver Sun saying that they have received a number of federal press releases that retain the "Government of Canada" branding, the new language has been seen on releases from the Treasury Board, one of the most powerful federal departments.

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