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Redeye

Systemic racism: Is that a thing?

May 21, 2015
| The racial justice organization Race Forward and hip-hop DJ Jay Smooth teamed up to create a series of short monologues on systemic racism. The videos they produced have gone viral.
Length: 13:38 minutes (12.49 MB)

When saving lives does not count and government promises are not fulfilled

Photo: flickr/Takver

Since claiming a majority victory in 2011, the Harper government, with its Minister of Immigration Jason Kenney, and later Chris Alexander, has succeeded in quickly transforming Canada from a country known for its humanitarian tradition of welcoming outsiders and providing sanctuary to the oppressed into one that fears and distrusts refugees.

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The Harper government v. refugees, 2006-2015

Photo: Flickr/Justin Jensen

It has been nearly a decade since the Conservative party came to power. Since then, the government has embarked on controversial reforms that have had devastating effects on refugees, as well as damaged Canada's reputation as a refugee-welcoming country. The following are the most significant changes that have been enacted:

2009-2013: Funding cuts to the United Nations Relief and Work Agency for Palestinian Refugees in the Near East (UNRWA)

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Europe's migrant quota system leaves much to be desired

Europe's plan on sharing migrant quotes is a step in the right direction but not good enough.

Related rabble.ca story:

North African migrants in Sicily
| May 13, 2015

The racist roots of Bill C-51

Security certificates are not new, having existed in multiple forms for almost 40 years. In them, we find precursors to Bill C-51.

Related rabble.ca story:

| April 19, 2015
| April 18, 2015
| April 8, 2015

Federal government warns foreign workers going 'underground' is not an option

Photo: Flickr/Alex Guiford

The federal government has warned the thousands of temporary foreign workers (TFWs) whose work permits are expired yesterday, April 1, to comply with the new law by leaving the country or be dealt with accordingly.

"Let there be no mistake: We will not tolerate people going 'underground.' Flouting our immigration laws is not an option, and we will deal with offenders swiftly and fairly," said Immigration Minister Chris Alexander and Employment Minister Pierre Poilievre in a statement.

Four years ago, April 1, 2015 was set as the deadline for TFWs in low-skilled occupations to either become permanent residents or return to their home countries as a means to encourage employers to hire Canadians.

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