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| March 31, 2015
Image: Proposed Squamish LNG Plant on the Howe Sound's western shore. Image borr
| March 26, 2015
Columnists

The Right to Be Cold: Sounding the alarm on climate change in the North

Photo: Robert J. Galbraith/flickr

Sheila Watt-Cloutier is one of the most widely respected political figures to emerge from Canada's Arctic, and this potential was identified early on. When she was just 10 years old, she and her friend Lizzie were selected as promising future Inuit leaders and sent to live with a white family in the tiny coastal community of Blanche, N.S. Having grown up in Nunavik, Que., on dog sleds and in canoes, the young Watt-Cloutier loved new experiences and approached the long voyage south in the spirit of adventure. The girls were in for what Watt-Cloutier now describes as a "brutal shock."

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Photo: Bert Kaufmann, Flickr Creative Commons, Drought
| March 22, 2015
| March 19, 2015
Photo: Dennis Tsang/flickr
| March 17, 2015
Image: Flickr/stuckincustoms
| March 11, 2015
Columnists

Riding the roller-coaster: What lower oil prices mean for Canada's economy

Photo: elston/flickr

Introduction

Canada's economy has been thrown into turmoil by the dramatic decline in oil prices over the last six months. World crude prices have plunged by half: from around $100 (US) per barrel in summer 2014, to around $50 today (see Figure 1). Worse yet, Canada's oil output receives an even lower price: our unprocessed heavy oil exports sell for only about $35 per barrel in the U.S. market (because of its lower quality and a regional supply glut).

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We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

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Map showing the proposing location of Site C dam and its reservoir.
| March 9, 2015
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