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Corn field
| July 26, 2016
Columnists

Active transportation is a big part of the climate change solution

Photo: M. Accarino/flickr

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Green Majority Radio

Pentagon is freaking out -- aren't you?

July 19, 2016
| The Pentagon wants to anticipate and control social unrest. There are two main points to glean here, firstly why they are suddenly so concerned, and how they are going about using this research.
Length: 53:13 minutes (48.73 MB)
Redeye

Site C opponents raise a paddle against dam project

July 18, 2016
| On July 9, thousands of people grabbed a paddle to oppose B.C. Hydro's Site C dam. The dam will flood thousands of hectares of prime agricultural land, much of it within Treaty 8 territory.
Length: 19:01 minutes (17.42 MB)
Image: Flickr/Number 10 Credit: Georgina Coupe
| July 18, 2016
| July 15, 2016

Views from people on the frontlines of climate change

"The Caribou Taste Different Now": Inuit Elders Observe Climate Change

by edited by José Gérin-Lajoie, Alain Cuerrier, and Laura Siegwart Collier
(Nunavut Arctic College Media,
2016;
$39.95)

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Between 2007 and 2010, researchers and community partners interviewed nearly 150 Elders and knowledge holders from Nunavut, Nunavik and Nunatsiavut, about their observations of environmental changes across six broad categories: berries, other plants, animals, seasons, climate/weather, and impacts on traditional ways of life.

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We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

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Photo: Ralph Arvesen/flickr
| July 12, 2016
| July 11, 2016
| July 6, 2016
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