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Redeye

One-woman show tackles story of first Jewish person in Canada

March 1, 2015
| Toronto artist Heather Hermant brings her own-woman show, "ribcage: this wide passage," to Vancouver this week. The performance tells the story of Esther Brandeau who came to colonial Canada in 1738.
Length: 14:20 minutes (13.13 MB)
Redeye

Kayak: A play about climate change

January 11, 2015
| Annie is a wealthy middle-aged woman lost in a kayak. As she floats aimlessly on the water, she is haunted by memories of Julie, a radical environmentalist and girlfriend of her son, Peter.
Length: 14:59 minutes (13.73 MB)
| July 20, 2014

Video: Don't Get My Valley Up! A rap from Stone Fence Theatre's new musical

Don't Get My Valley Up! -- the rap song used in the Act 1 finale of Stone Fence Theatre's new musical, G'day, We're from the Valley, EH!, which opens in Eganville July 22 and plays throughout the summer and fall in six Renfrew County locations. The rap is written by Ish Theilheimer and Chantal Elie-Sernoskie. Leads in video: Robin Pinkerton, Chantal Elie-Sernoskie and Ambrose Mullin. Information, scheduling and ticket purchases are all at the company's website, www.stonefence.ca . The video was shot and produced by Space Camp Collective, with recording by Robin Pinkerton.

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Columnists

'Poor theatre' explores possibilities of art, lifts veil on humanness

Photo: Dave Wilson/flickr

Mario Biagini is a genial, 49-year-old Italian theatre worker who's one of two designated successors to theatre pioneer Jerzy Grotowski. He's in Toronto with a troupe of colleagues to perform and teach at U of T. I know theatre worker sounds mundane but the term "The Work" appears often as he talks; it's spoken with reverence, the way hockey players say "The Game."

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We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

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Redeye

Night

January 20, 2014
| One of the plays at the PuSH festival this week is set in the far North. It tells the story of the encounter between a museum worker from Toronto and a woman who lives in Pond Inlet, Nunavut.
Length: 16:32 minutes (15.15 MB)
Redeye

Medicine

January 19, 2014
| Writer and performer TJ Dawe’s newest monologue recounts what happened when he attended a week-long group therapy retreat where participants took the Amazonian psychotropic plant ayahuasca.
Length: 17:57 minutes (16.44 MB)
Redeye

Jack and the Beanstalk: An East Van Panto

December 16, 2013
| Pantomime is a popular Christmas theatre tradition in the U.K. where audiences shout back at the characters and enjoy humour that ranges from bawdy to political to slapstick.
Length: 13:35 minutes (12.44 MB)

Check your heads: Living theatre examines relationships to corporate culture

Photo: Tim Matheson

This autumn, The Theatre for Living (Headlines Theatre) presents Corporations in our Heads, an audience-led play that is completely absent of scripts or designated actors. Its main mission: to provide insight into the various relationships we have with corporate culture and control in our daily lives.

Though impossible to clearly articulate, as the content is improvisational and ranges night to night, Artistic and Managing Director David Diamond explains "theatre is a language that belongs to everyone."

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Redeye

Play: 'You Should Have Stayed Home'

October 1, 2013
| Playwright Tommy Taylor was one of 900 people arrested and held in detention during the G20 summit in Toronto in July 2010. He’s turned the Facebook post he wrote about it into a play.
Length: 16:56 minutes (15.52 MB)
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