Augusto PinochetSyndicate content

Alvin Finkel
| May 12, 2014
Alison Redford
| January 17, 2013
Columnists

Whistle-blowers, war criminals and the extradition of Julian Assange

Anonymous supporters of Bradley Manning. Photo: Bradley Manning Support Network/Flickr

Wikileaks founder Julian Assange's protracted effort to fight extradition to Sweden suffered a body blow this week. Britain's Supreme Court upheld the arrest warrant, issued in December 2010. After the court announced its split 5-2 decision, the justices surprised many legal observers by granting Assange's lawyers an opportunity to challenge their decision -- the first such reconsideration since the high-profile British extradition case from more than a decade ago against former Chilean dictator Augusto Pinochet. The decision came almost two years to the day after Pvt. Bradley Manning was arrested in Iraq for allegedly leaking hundreds of thousands of classified U.S. government documents to Wikileaks.

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Remembering Chile's 9/11

Something Fierce: Memoirs of a Revolutionary Daughter

Something Fierce: Memoirs of a Revolutionary Daughter

by Carmen Aguirre
(Douglas & McIntyre,
2011;
$32.95)

The year was 1973 and it is the September 11th that forever altered the lives of Chileans as a military coup removed socialist president Salvador Allende and General Augusto Pinochet took power. This led to widespread terror and repression, another 9/11 never to be forgotten.

Carmen Aguirre, author of Something Fierce: Memoirs of a Revolutionary Daughter, was a five-year-old in Chile at that time, and those events defined the trajectory of her life. She came to Canada the next year with her family as a political refugee and five years later, returned to South America as part of the Chilean resistance movement.

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